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The abundance of health-associated bacteria is altered in PAH polluted soils-Implications for health in urban areas?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287930
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(11):e0187852
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Anirudra Parajuli
Mira Grönroos
Sari Kauppi
Tomasz Plociniczak
Marja I Roslund
Polina Galitskaya
Olli H Laitinen
Heikki Hyöty
Ari Jumpponen
Rauni Strömmer
Martin Romantschuk
Nan Hui
Aki Sinkkonen
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(11):e0187852
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Finland
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Soil Microbiology
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
Long-term exposure to polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been connected to chronic human health disorders. It is also well-known that i) PAH contamination alters soil bacterial communities, ii) human microbiome is associated with environmental microbiome, and iii) alteration in the abundance of members in several bacterial phyla is associated with adverse or beneficial human health effects. We hypothesized that soil pollution by PAHs altered soil bacterial communities that had known associations with human health. The rationale behind our study was to increase understanding and potentially facilitate reconsidering factors that lead to health disorders in areas characterized by PAH contamination. Large containers filled with either spruce forest soil, pine forest soil, peat, or glacial sand were left to incubate or contaminated with creosote. Biological degradation of PAHs was monitored using GC-MS, and the bacterial community composition was analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing. Proteobacteria had higher and Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes had lower relative abundance in creosote contaminated soils than in non-contaminated soils. Earlier studies have demonstrated that an increase in the abundance of Proteobacteria and decreased abundance of the phyla Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes are particularly associated with adverse health outcomes and immunological disorders. Therefore, we propose that pollution-induced shifts in natural soil bacterial community, like in PAH-polluted areas, can contribute to the prevalence of chronic diseases. We encourage studies that simultaneously address the classic "adverse toxin effect" paradigm and our novel "altered environmental microbiome" hypothesis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29145477 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute encephalitis. A survey of epidemiological, clinical and microbiological features covering a twelve-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245138
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1981;209(1-2):115-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
M. Koskiniemi
V. Manninen
A. Vaheri
K. Sainio
P. Eistola
P. Karli
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1981;209(1-2):115-20
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Encephalitis - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Sex Factors
Simplexvirus - isolation & purification
Viruses - isolation & purification
Abstract
The 191 adult patients with acute encephalitis who attended the Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Helsinki, during the 12-year period 1967-78, were analyzed for epidemiological, clinical, and microbiological features. Young healthy adults of either sex under 30 years of age were the most susceptible. The duration of symptoms varied from some hours to more than one month (less than or equal to 5 days in half of the patients). Prodromal symptoms were observed in 37.7%, meningeal signs or symptoms in 93.2%, features indicating brain involvement in 84.3% and clear effects on consciousness in 27.7% of the patients. Half (50.8%) recovered, while 43 (22.5%) were left with at least moderate disability after the acute phase. Twelve patients (6.3%) died. Lower socioeconomic status and age over 35 years were associated with increased mortality. The 10 patients with proven or presumptive herpes simplex virus (HSV) etiology had a mortality of 40% and only one recovered satisfactorily. There were 14 further cases suggestive of HSV. Mumps, Coxsackie B, adeno, and measles were the most frequent identifiable causes after HSV. Other etiological factors, including bacteria, appeared occasionally. The etiology remained obscure in 58.6% of the cases.
PubMed ID
6259899 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adequacy analysis of bacteriological studies of pyo-inflammatory diseases of ENT organs with fatal outcome].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154233
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2008;(5):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
I A Voloshina
V G Zhukhovitskii
A B Turovskii
I V Drabkina
E E Shasheva
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2008;(5):29-32
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Bacteriological Techniques - standards
Diagnosis, Differential
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases - diagnosis - mortality
Reproducibility of Results
Russia - epidemiology
Suppuration - diagnosis - mortality
Abstract
Results of analysis of the case history patients that died from complications of pyo-inflammatory diseases of ear, nose, and throat in multifield hospitals of Moscow during the last 10 years are presented. Data of microbiological studies for the entire period of each patient's stay in the hospitals are extracted They indicate that bacteriological studies are not prescribed as frequently as needed. As a rule, seeding is conducted after a patient is transferred to the intensive therapy department in 16 or more days following admission to the hospital. The materials seeded are largely biological fluids rather than pathological excreta from primary inflammatory foci.
PubMed ID
19008838 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adult-onset mucoviscidosis: longer survival of patients in Moscow and Moscow Region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123358
Source
Ter Arkh. 2012;84(3):54-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Source
Ter Arkh. 2012;84(3):54-8
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Cohort Studies
Cystic Fibrosis - genetics - microbiology - mortality
Female
Genetic Testing
Genome
Gram-Negative Bacteria - isolation & purification
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Moscow - epidemiology
Mutation - genetics
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate survival median and its changes, number of patients over 18 years of age for 1991-2000 and 2001-2010 for 20-year period (1991-2010), to elucidate factors affecting survival for 2001-2010 in mucoviscidosis children living in Moscow and Moscow Region and treated outpatiently in specialized medical centers.
Case records were analysed for mucoviscidosis patients registered in specialized clinics of Moscow on 01.01.01 and 01.01.11. Survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier curve.
Survival medians for 1991-2000 and 2001-2010 was 25.7 and 35.1 years, respectively In the group of mucoviscidosis patients with Staphylococcus aureus infection survival was significantly higher than in those infected with gram-negative microflora. Longer survival was reported in patients with "soft" mutation (p = 0.06927).
The survival median for mucoviscidosis patients for 2001-2010 was 35.1 years. The percentage of adult patients in the last decade significantly rose from 19.5 to 32%. Gram-negative microflora significantly reduces survival, while 'soft" mutation prolongs survival. Creation of National Register will specify survival of mucoviscidosis patients in all regions of the Russian Federation.
PubMed ID
22708424 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aetiologies and risk factors for neonatal sepsis and pneumonia mortality among Alaskan infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6614
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2005 Oct;133(5):877-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
B D Gessner
L. Castrodale
M. Soriano-Gabarro
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, Anchorage, Alaska 99524, USA. Brad_Gessner@health.state.ak.us
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2005 Oct;133(5):877-81
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Candida - isolation & purification
Candidiasis - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Databases, Factual
Gram-Negative Bacteria - isolation & purification
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Gram-Positive Bacteria - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Pneumonia - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Septicemia - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Abstract
We evaluated all fatal neonatal sepsis and pneumonia cases occurring in Alaska during 1992-2000. Risk factors were evaluated using a database of all births occurring during the study period. Of 32 cases, group B streptococcus (GBS) was isolated from 21% (all 7 days of age), non-GBS Gram-positive bacteria from 50% (53%
PubMed ID
16181508 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aetiology and risk factors of community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281873
Source
Clin Respir J. 2016 Nov;10(6):756-764
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Wenche Røysted
Øystein Simonsen
Andrew Jenkins
Marjut Sarjomaa
Martin Veel Svendsen
Eivind Ragnhildstveit
Yngvar Tveten
Anita Kanestrøm
Halfrid Waage
Jetmund Ringstad
Source
Clin Respir J. 2016 Nov;10(6):756-764
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Gram-Negative Bacteria - isolation & purification
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Gram-Positive Bacteria - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
In Norway, data on the aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in hospitalized patients are limited. The aims of this study were to investigate the bacterial aetiology of CAP in hospitalized patients in Norway, risk factors for CAP and possible differences in risk factors between patients with Legionnaire's disease and pneumonia because of other causes.
Adult patients with radiologically confirmed CAP admitted to hospital were eligible for the study. Routine aerobic and Legionella culture of sputum, blood culture, urinary antigen test for Legionella pneumophila and Streptococcus pneumoniae, polymerase chain reaction detection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Bordetella pertussis from throat specimens, and serology for L.?pneumophila serogroup 1-6 were performed. A questionnaire, which included demographic and clinical data, risk factors and treatment, was completed.
We included 374 patients through a 20-month study period in 2007-2008. The aetiological agent was detected in 37% of cases. S.?pneumoniae (20%) was the most prevalent agent, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (6%) and Legionella spp. (6%). Eight Legionella cases were diagnosed by urinary antigen test, of which four also had positive serology. In addition, 13 Legionella cases were diagnosed by serology. The degree of comorbidity was high. An increased risk of hospital-diagnosed Legionella pneumonia was found among patients with a diagnosis of chronic congestive heart failure.
Our results indicate that S.?pneumoniae is the most common bacterial cause of pneumonia in hospitalized patients, and the prevalence of Legionella pneumonia is probably higher in Norway than recognized previously.
PubMed ID
25764275 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airborne fungal and bacterial components in PM1 dust from biofuel plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149575
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2009 Oct;53(7):749-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Anne Mette Madsen
Vivi Schlünssen
Tina Olsen
Torben Sigsgaard
Hediye Avci
Author Affiliation
The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. amm@nrcwe.dk
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2009 Oct;53(7):749-57
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - isolation & purification
Aerosols
Air Microbiology
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Biofuels - microbiology
Denmark
Dust
Fungi - isolation & purification
Humans
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Particle Size
Seasons
Abstract
Fungi grown in pure cultures produce DNA- or RNA-containing particles smaller than spore size ( 3)-beta-D-glucans. In the 29 PM(1) samples, cultivable fungi were found in six samples and with a median concentration below detection level. Using microscopy, fungal spores were identified in 22 samples. The components NAGase and (1 --> 3)-beta-D-glucans, which are mainly associated with fungi, were present in all PM(1) samples. Thermophilic actinomycetes were present in 23 of the 29 PM(1) samples [average = 739 colony-forming units (CFU) m(-3)]. Cultivable and 'total bacteria' were found in average concentrations of, respectively, 249 CFU m(-3) and 1.8 x 10(5) m(-3). DNA- and RNA-containing particles of different lengths were counted by microscopy and revealed a high concentration of particles with a length of 0.5-1.5 microm and only few particles >1.5 microm. The number of cultivable fungi and beta-glucan in the total dust correlated significantly with the number of DNA/RNA-containing particles with lengths of between 1.0 and 1.5 microm, with DNA/RNA-containing particles >1.5 microm, and with other fungal components in PM(1) dust. Airborne beta-glucan and NAGase were found in PM(1) samples where no cultivable fungi were present, and beta-glucan and NAGase were found in higher concentrations per fungal spore in PM(1) dust than in total dust. This indicates that fungal particles smaller than fungal spore size are present in the air at the plants. Furthermore, many bacteria, including actinomycetes, were present in PM(1) dust. Only 0.2% of the bacteria in PM(1) dust were cultivable.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19620231 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air contaminants in a submarine equipped with air independent propulsion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166824
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Nov;8(11):1111-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Ola Persson
Christina Ostberg
Joakim Pagels
Aleksandra Sebastian
Author Affiliation
Division of Heat Transfer, Department of Heat and Power Engineering, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, 221 00, Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Nov;8(11):1111-21
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - standards
Carbon Dioxide - analysis - standards
Ecological Systems, Closed
Environmental Monitoring - standards
Gram-Negative Bacteria - isolation & purification
Humans
Hydrogen - analysis - standards
Life Support Systems
Organic Chemicals - analysis - standards
Oxygen - analysis - standards
Ozone - analysis - standards
Pressure
Submarine Medicine
Sweden
Temperature
Volatilization
Abstract
The Swedish Navy has operated submarines equipped with air independent propulsion for two decades. This type of submarine can stay submerged for periods far longer than other non-nuclear submarines are capable of. The air quality during longer periods of submersion has so far not been thoroughly investigated. This study presents results for a number of air quality parameters obtained during more than one week of continuous submerged operation. The measured parameters are pressure, temperature, relative humidity, oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter and microbiological contaminants. The measurements of airborne particles demonstrate that air pollutants typically occur at a low baseline level due to high air exchange rates and efficient air-cleaning devices. However, short-lived peaks with comparatively high concentrations occur, several of the sources for these have been identified. The concentrations of the pollutants measured in this study do not indicate a build-up of hazardous compounds during eight days of submersion. It is reasonable to assume that a substantial build-up of the investigated contaminants is not likely if the submersion period is prolonged several times, which is the case for modern submarines equipped with air independent propulsion.
PubMed ID
17075617 View in PubMed
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Allergic sensitization and microbial load--a comparison between Finland and Russian Karelia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165130
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2007 Apr;148(1):47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
T. Seiskari
A. Kondrashova
H. Viskari
M. Kaila
A-M Haapala
J. Aittoniemi
M. Virta
M. Hurme
R. Uibo
M. Knip
H. Hyöty
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, University of Tampere, Finland. tapio.seiskari@uta.fi
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2007 Apr;148(1):47-52
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Antibodies, Protozoan - blood
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Betula - immunology
Cats - immunology
Child
Enterovirus B, Human - immunology - isolation & purification
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology - isolation & purification
Hepatitis A virus - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Hypersensitivity - ethnology - immunology - microbiology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Pollen - immunology
Russia - epidemiology
Toxoplasma - immunology - isolation & purification
Viruses - isolation & purification
Abstract
Epidemiological data have indicated that some infections are associated with a low risk of allergic diseases, thus supporting the idea (hygiene hypothesis) that the microbial load is an important environmental factor conferring protection against the development of allergies. We set out to test the hygiene hypothesis in a unique epidemiological setting in two socio-economically and culturally markedly different, although genetically related, populations living in geographically adjacent areas. The study cohorts included 266 schoolchildren from the Karelian Republic in Russia and 266 schoolchildren from Finland. The levels of total IgE and allergen-specific IgE for birch, cat and egg albumen were measured. Microbial antibodies were analysed against enteroviruses (coxsackievirus B4), hepatitis A virus, Helicobacter pylori and Toxoplasma gondii. Although total IgE level was higher in Russian Karelian children compared to their Finnish peers, the prevalence of allergen-specific IgE was lower among Russian Karelian children. The prevalence of microbial antibodies was, in turn, significantly more frequent in the Karelian children, reflecting the conspicuous difference in socio-economic background factors. Microbial infections were associated with lower risk of allergic sensitization in Russian Karelian children, enterovirus showing the strongest protective effect in a multivariate model. The present findings support the idea that exposure to certain infections, particularly in childhood, may protect from the development of atopy. Enterovirus infections represent a new candidate to the list of markers of such a protective environment. However, possible causal relationship needs to be confirmed in further studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
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