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Phototoxicity of pyrene affects benthic algae and bacteria from the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86513
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2008 Feb 15;42(4):1371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2008
Author
Petersen Dorthe G
Reichenberg Fredrik
Dahllöf Ingela
Author Affiliation
National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Marine Ecology, University of Aarhus, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. dgp@dmu.dk
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2008 Feb 15;42(4):1371-6
Date
Feb-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algae - drug effects - radiation effects
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - drug effects - radiation effects
Pyrenes - toxicity
Ultraviolet Rays
Abstract
Phototoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Arctic is important to study since the future PAH load is likely to increase. In combination with the increased UV-light penetration due to ozone layer thinning, phototoxicity may be a potential problem for arctic areas. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of pyrene and phototoxicity of pyrene on natural algae and bacteria from arctic sediments. Sediments from a shallow-water marine baywere spiked with different pyrene concentrations. Microcosms containing the sediment were incubated under three light regimes, natural sunlight with UV-light, natural sunlight without UV-light, and dark. Significant effects were evident at low pyrene concentrations, particularly in presence of UV-light, indicating phototoxicity. The microalgae were especially sensitive to the phototoxicity of pyrene. Already atthe lowest pyrene concentration (Cfree: 4 nM) algal 14C-incorporation and chlorophyll a content were reduced. The toxic effects of pyrene on the microalgae probably led to the release of organic matter. In agreement with this, bacterial activity increased at high pyrene concentrations indicated by increased oxygen consumption and increased release of inorganic N and P from the sediment. This study indicates that phototoxicity of PAHs may be relevant for sediment communities from shallow marine arctic areas at environmentally relevant pyrene concentrations.
PubMed ID
18351119 View in PubMed
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[State of intestinal microbiocenosis and its correction in pregnancy women living under conditions of increased radiation pollution]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64719
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 1994 Jun;39(6):44-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
N V Kozlova
T S Spirina
M I Zhilenko
N I Iakovleva
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 1994 Jun;39(6):44-8
Date
Jun-1994
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteria - drug effects - radiation effects
Bacteriocins - therapeutic use
Biological Products - therapeutic use
Candida - drug effects - radiation effects
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Intestine, Large - microbiology
Lactobacillus
Power Plants
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Ukraine
Abstract
The contents of the large intestine were investigated bacteriologically in 44 pregnant women at the pregnancy term of 27-28 weeks living in the areas contaminated with radionuclides at a concentration of 15-40 C/km2. It was found that in 9.6 per cent of the women the intestinal microbiocenosis was within the normal and in 19.1 per cent there was detected marked dysbacteriosis. In the other women compensated or subcompensated intestinal dysbacteriosis was recorded. The state of the large intestine microbiocenosis in the pregnant women did not depend on urogynecological or infectious diseases in the case histories. The prophylactic treatment with eubiotics (bifidumbacterin per rectum and lactobacterin intravaginally) aimed at the correction of the impaired microbiocenosis had a favourable effect which did not depend on urogynecological or infectious diseases in the case histories. After the completion of the prophylaxis course with the eubiotics some indices improved but the percentage of the pregnant women isolating colibacilli with the properties of virulence increased.
PubMed ID
7848007 View in PubMed
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Treatment of Arctic wastewater by chemical coagulation, UV and peracetic acid disinfection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297769
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32851-32859
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Ravi Kumar Chhetri
Ewa Klupsch
Henrik Rasmus Andersen
Pernille Erland Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet, Building 115, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32851-32859
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - drug effects - radiation effects
Denmark
Disinfectants - chemistry - pharmacology
Disinfection - methods
Enterococcus - drug effects - radiation effects
Escherichia coli - drug effects - radiation effects
Greenland
Heterotrophic Processes
Peracetic Acid - chemistry - pharmacology
Ultraviolet Rays
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
Conventional wastewater treatment is challenging in the Arctic region due to the cold climate and scattered population. Thus, no wastewater treatment plant exists in Greenland, and raw wastewater is discharged directly to nearby waterbodies without treatment. We investigated the efficiency of physicochemical wastewater treatment, in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. Raw wastewater from Kangerlussuaq was treated by chemical coagulation and UV disinfection. By applying 7.5 mg Al/L polyaluminium chloride (PAX XL100), 73% of turbidity and 28% phosphate was removed from raw wastewater. E. coli and Enterococcus were removed by 4 and 2.5 log, respectively, when UV irradiation of 0.70 kWh/m3 was applied to coagulated wastewater. Furthermore, coagulated raw wastewater in Denmark, which has a chemical quality similar to Greenlandic wastewater, was disinfected by peracetic acid or UV irradiation. Removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 6 and 12 mg/L peracetic acid was 2.8 and 3.1 log, respectively. Similarly, removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 0.21 and 2.10 kWh/m3 for UV irradiation was 2.1 and greater than 4 log, respectively. Physicochemical treatment of raw wastewater followed by UV irradiation and/or peracetic acid disinfection showed the potential for treatment of arctic wastewater.
PubMed ID
28210951 View in PubMed
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