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Asymptomatic bacteriuria in a population of elderly in municipal institutional care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188085
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2002 Sep;20(3):166-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Katarina Hedin
Christer Petersson
Kristina Widebäck
Gunnar Kahlmeter
Sigvard Mölstad
Author Affiliation
R&D Kronoberg County Council, Växjö, Sweden. katarina.hedin@ltkronoberg.se
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2002 Sep;20(3):166-8
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Bacteriuria - epidemiology - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Nursing Homes
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology - urine
Abstract
To study the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) among patients in municipal institutional care for the elderly.
A cross-sectional study.
Three different municipalities in southern Sweden.
237 elderly people in municipal institutional care.
Positive urine cultures.
In the first culture, the prevalence of bacteriuria was 42%; 47% for women and 30% for men. ABU occurred in 23% of the patients; in 26% of women and in 16% of men. Urinary incontinence was more common among patients with ABU.
Bacteriuria is common among elderly people living in institutions. This should be borne in mind when patents in institutional care for the elderly have fever. Other differential diagnoses than urinary tract infection should be considered before antibiotic treatment is given.
PubMed ID
12389754 View in PubMed
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Bacteria associated with crabs from cold waters with emphasis on the occurrence of potential human pathogens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240526
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1984 May;47(5):1054-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1984
Author
M A Faghri
C L Pennington
L S Cronholm
R M Atlas
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1984 May;47(5):1054-61
Date
May-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Brachyura - microbiology - ultrastructure
Humans
Maine
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred Strains
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Oregon
Seawater
Sewage
Washington
Water Microbiology
Abstract
A diverse array of bacterial species, including several potential human pathogens, was isolated from edible crabs collected in cold waters. Crabs collected near Kodiak Island, Alaska, contained higher levels of bacteria than crabs collected away from regions of human habitation. The bacteria associated with the crabs collected near Kodiak included Yersinia enterocolitica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species; the pathogenicity of these isolates was demonstrated in mice. Although coliforms were not found, the bacterial species associated with the tissues of crabs collected near Kodiak indicate possible fecal contamination that may have occurred through contact with sewage. Compared with surrounding waters and sediments, the crab tissues contained much higher proportions of gram-positive cocci. As revealed by indirect plate counts and direct scanning electron microscopic observations, muscle and hemolymph tissues contained much lower levels of bacteria than shell and gill tissues. After the death of a crab, however, the numbers of bacteria associated with hemolymph and muscle tissues increased significantly. Microcosm studies showed that certain bacterial populations, e.g., Vibrio cholerae, can be bioaccumulated in crab gill tissues. The results of this study indicate the need for careful review of waste disposal practices where edible crabs may be contaminated with microorganisms that are potential human pathogens and the need for surveillance of shellfish for pathogenic microorganisms that naturally occur in marine ecosystems.
Notes
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PubMed ID
6742824 View in PubMed
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Bacterial meningitis in children in Iceland, 1975-2010: a nationwide epidemiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107883
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2013 Nov;45(11):819-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Kolfinna Snaebjarnardóttir
Helga Erlendsdóttir
Ingi Karl Reynisson
Karl Kristinsson
Sandra Halldórsdóttir
Hjördís Hardardóttir
Thórólfur Gudnason
Magnús Gottfredsson
Ásgeir Haraldsson
Author Affiliation
From the University of Iceland Faculty of Medicine.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2013 Nov;45(11):819-24
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Meningitis, Bacterial - epidemiology - microbiology
Mortality
Vaccination - utilization
Abstract
Bacterial meningitis is a serious and potentially rapid life-threatening disease. Therefore, to ensure appropriate treatment, early recognition of signs and symptoms is imperative, along with knowledge of the epidemiology and microbiology of the disease.
A long-term, nationwide epidemiological study of bacterial causes of meningitis in children (= 18 y) in Iceland during the period 1975-2010 was carried out. A detailed chart review was performed of all cases diagnosed in 1995-2010.
A total of 477 children were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis during the period 1975-2010. Of these, 67% were aged under 5 y. The most common pathogens were Neisseria meningitidis (n = 265), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 132), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 47), and Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 19); their incidences varied according to age. The age-specific incidence (cases/100,000/y) dropped from 26 in 1975 to 1 in 2010 (p
PubMed ID
23968225 View in PubMed
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Bacteriological analysis of fresh produce in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75520
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2002 Aug 25;77(3):199-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-2002
Author
Gro S Johannessen
Semir Loncarevic
Hilde Kruse
Author Affiliation
Section for Food and Feed Microbiology, National Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway. gro.johannessen@vetinst.no
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2002 Aug 25;77(3):199-204
Date
Aug-25-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales
Anethum graveolens - microbiology
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Microbiology
Fruit - microbiology - standards
Humans
Lettuce - microbiology
Norway
Petroselinum - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Public Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vegetables - microbiology - standards
Abstract
A total of 890 samples of fresh produce obtained from Norwegian markets were examined in order to assess the bacteriological quality of the products and their potential public health risk. The samples comprised lettuce, pre-cut salads, growing herbs, parsley and dill, mushrooms and strawberries. The samples were analysed for the presence of thermotolerant coliform bacteria (TCB), Escherichia coli O157, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus spp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. Neither Salmonella spp. nor E. coli O157 were isolated. For all product groups included, TCB were isolated from a small proportion of samples. Three samples harboured L. monocytogenes; one of the isolates belonging to serogroup 1 (champignons) and two of the isolates belonging to serogroup 4 (Chinese leaves and strawberries). Staphylococci were isolated from a relatively large proportion of the samples of strawberries and mushrooms. However, only four isolates were identified as S. aureus (non-toxinogenic). By the use of PCR, the presence of Y. enterocolitica was indicated in a few of the samples of lettuce, whilst no positive samples were found using a culturing method. The study shows that the occurrence of pathogenic bacteria and TCB in the products analysed was quite low. Nevertheless, the results indicate that the type of products analysed may contain pathogenic bacteria and thereby represent a risk to the consumers in regard to food-borne diseases.
PubMed ID
12160079 View in PubMed
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Biliary microflora in patients undergoing cholecystectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260257
Source
Surg Infect (Larchmt). 2014 Jun;15(3):262-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Bahman Darkahi
Gabriel Sandblom
Håkan Liljeholm
Per Videhult
Åsa Melhus
Ib Christian Rasmussen
Source
Surg Infect (Larchmt). 2014 Jun;15(3):262-5
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Bile - microbiology
Cholecystectomy
Female
Gallbladder - microbiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sweden
Abstract
The management of acute cholecystitis requires a sound knowledge of the biliary microflora.
Bile samples were taken for culture according to a standard routine during all cholecystectomies performed from April 2007 to February 2009 in the Department of Surgery at Enköping Hospital. The use of antibiotics within the 3-mo period before surgery, indication for surgery, prophylactic antibiotics, and post-operative complications were recorded prospectively.
Altogether, 246 procedures were performed during the study period, of which 149 (62%) were done on women. The mean (±SD) age of the study subjects was 49±16?y. Bacterial growth was seen in cultures from 34 (14%) of the subjects. The mean age of subjects with positive cultures was 64?y and that of subjects with negative cultures was 47?y (p
PubMed ID
24801654 View in PubMed
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Biodiversity of thermophilic prokaryotes with hydrolytic activities in hot springs of Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka (Russia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91410
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Jan;75(1):286-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Kublanov Ilya V
Perevalova Anna A
Slobodkina Galina B
Lebedinsky Aleksander V
Bidzhieva Salima K
Kolganova Tatyana V
Kaliberda Elena N
Rumsh Lev D
Haertlé Thomas
Bonch-Osmolovskaya Elizaveta A
Author Affiliation
Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. kublanov.ilya@gmail.com
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Jan;75(1):286-91
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Archaea - classification - isolation & purification
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Biodiversity
DNA Fingerprinting
DNA, Archaeal - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Hot Springs - chemistry - microbiology
Hot Temperature
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Russia
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Samples of water from the hot springs of Uzon Caldera with temperatures from 68 to 87 degrees C and pHs of 4.1 to 7.0, supplemented with proteinaceous (albumin, casein, or alpha- or beta-keratin) or carbohydrate (cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose, chitin, or agarose) biological polymers, were filled with thermal water and incubated at the same sites, with the contents of the tubes freely accessible to the hydrothermal fluid. As a result, several enrichment cultures growing in situ on different polymeric substrates were obtained. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments obtained after PCR with Bacteria-specific primers showed that the bacterial communities developing on carbohydrates included the genera Caldicellulosiruptor and Dictyoglomus and that those developing on proteins contained members of the Thermotogales order. DGGE analysis performed after PCR with Archaea- and Crenarchaeota-specific primers showed that archaea related to uncultured environmental clones, particularly those of the Crenarchaeota phylum, were present in both carbohydrate- and protein-degrading communities. Five isolates obtained from in situ enrichments or corresponding natural samples of water and sediments represented the bacterial genera Dictyoglomus and Caldanaerobacter as well as new archaea of the Crenarchaeota phylum. Thus, in situ enrichment and consequent isolation showed the diversity of thermophilic prokaryotes competing for biopolymers in microbial communities of terrestrial hot springs.
PubMed ID
18978089 View in PubMed
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Blood stream infections during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia: treatment cycle matters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100571
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2010 Oct;29(10):1211-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
H. Syrjälä
P. Ohtonen
U. Kinnunen
R. Räty
E. Elonen
T. Nousiainen
E. Jantunen
K. Remes
M. Itälä-Remes
R. Silvennoinen
P. Koistinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infection Control, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2010 Oct;29(10):1211-8
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Blood - microbiology
Cytarabine - therapeutic use
Female
Finland
Humans
Idarubicin - therapeutic use
Incidence
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - complications - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Neutropenia - chemically induced - complications
Prospective Studies
Sepsis - epidemiology
Thioguanine - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency of blood stream infections (BSIs) during neutropenia in different cycles of intensive chemotherapy treatment in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The register data of 327 consecutive patients aged 16-66 years having de novo AML between September 1992 and December 2001 were prospectively gathered in five Finnish tertiary care leukemia centers. The patients had not received fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. Reported BSI rates were compared during neutropenia in four chemotherapy treatment cycles (C). There were 956 treatment episodes, with 456 (47.7%) positive blood cultures. BSI was monomicrobial in 327 episodes (71.7%) and polymicrobial in 129 (28.3%). The overall incidence rate (per 1,000 hospital days) for BSI was 13.2, varying from 6.8 in CI after idarubicin, conventional-dose cytarabine, and thioguanine to 15.6 in CII, 15.8 in CIII, and 17.6 in CIV. The distribution of monomicrobial gram-positive BSIs was as follows: CI, 71.7%; CII, 62.8%; CIII, 53.3%; CIV, 36.6%; and CI-IV together, 43.2%. The most common finding in the four different cycles was coagulase-negative staphylococci (38.3 to 30.6%). Viridans group streptococci were most commonly observed (in 20.4% of positive blood cultures) during CII after high-dose cytarabine and idarubicin treatments. The distribution of monomicrobial gram-negative BSIs was as follows: CI, 21.7%; CII, 36.3%; CIII, 45.7%; CIV, 46.9%; and CI-IV together, 37.9%. A great variation of incidence and types of microorganisms between AML chemotherapy cycles was found. It would be more reasonable to analyze chemotherapy cycle-based BSI results rather than the overall results.
PubMed ID
20556469 View in PubMed
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Bronchiolitis and pneumonia requiring hospitalization in young first nations children in Northern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264115
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014 Oct;33(10):1023-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Sarah McCuskee
Michael Kirlew
Len Kelly
Sonya Fewer
Thomas Kovesi
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014 Oct;33(10):1023-6
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Bronchiolitis - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Viruses - classification - isolation & purification
Abstract
High rates of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), including bronchiolitis and pneumonia, have been reported in Inuit infants living in arctic Canada. We examined rates of LRTI in First Nations Canadian infants living in the Sioux Lookout Zone, in Northern Ontario.
A retrospective review of hospital admissions for LRTI during a 5-year period, in patients
PubMed ID
24751861 View in PubMed
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Coexistence of Microaerophilic, Nitrate-Reducing, and Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidizers and Fe(III) Reducers in Coastal Marine Sediment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277446
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Dec 18;82(5):1433-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-18-2015
Author
Katja Laufer
Mark Nordhoff
Hans Røy
Caroline Schmidt
Sebastian Behrens
Bo Barker Jørgensen
Andreas Kappler
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Dec 18;82(5):1433-47
Date
Dec-18-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerobiosis
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Biota
Denmark
Ferric Compounds - metabolism
Ferrous Compounds - metabolism
Geologic Sediments - microbiology
Nitrates - metabolism
Oxidation-Reduction
Phototrophic Processes
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Abstract
Iron is abundant in sediments, where it can be biogeochemically cycled between its divalent and trivalent redox states. The neutrophilic microbiological Fe cycle involves Fe(III)-reducing and three different physiological groups of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, i.e., microaerophilic, anoxygenic phototrophic, and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. However, it is unknown whether all three groups coexist in one habitat and how they are spatially distributed in relation to gradients of O2, light, nitrate, and Fe(II). We examined two coastal marine sediments in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, by cultivation and most probable number (MPN) studies for Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers and by quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays for microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. Our results demonstrate the coexistence of all three metabolic types of Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers. In qPCR, microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (Zetaproteobacteria) were present with up to 3.2 × 10(6) cells g dry sediment(-1). In MPNs, nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizers, and Fe(III) reducers reached cell numbers of up to 3.5 × 10(4), 3.1 × 10(2), and 4.4 × 10(4) g dry sediment(-1), respectively. O2 and light penetrated only a few millimeters, but the depth distribution of the different iron metabolizers did not correlate with the profile of O2, Fe(II), or light. Instead, abundances were homogeneous within the upper 3 cm of the sediment, probably due to wave-induced sediment reworking and bioturbation. In microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment cultures, strains belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria were identified. Photoferrotrophic enrichments contained strains related to Chlorobium and Rhodobacter; the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) enrichments contained strains related to Hoeflea and Denitromonas. This study shows the coexistence of all three types of Fe(II) oxidizers in two near-shore marine environments and the potential for competition and interrelationships between them.
Notes
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Erratum In: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2016 Jun 15;82(12):369427247310
PubMed ID
26682861 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.