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The activated sludge ecosystem contains a core community of abundant organisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275609
Source
ISME J. 2016 Jan;10(1):11-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Aaron M Saunders
Mads Albertsen
Jes Vollertsen
Per H Nielsen
Source
ISME J. 2016 Jan;10(1):11-20
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Denmark
Ecosystem
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sewage - microbiology
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
Understanding the microbial ecology of a system requires that the observed population dynamics can be linked to their metabolic functions. However, functional characterization is laborious and the choice of organisms should be prioritized to those that are frequently abundant (core) or transiently abundant, which are therefore putatively make the greatest contribution to carbon turnover in the system. We analyzed the microbial communities in 13 Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal in consecutive years and a single plant periodically over 6 years, using Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons of the V4 region. The plants contained a core community of 63 abundant genus-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that made up 68% of the total reads. A core community consisting of abundant OTUs was also observed within the incoming wastewater to three plants. The net growth rate for individual OTUs was quantified using mass balance, and it was found that 10% of the total reads in the activated sludge were from slow or non-growing OTUs, and that their measured abundance was primarily because of immigration with the wastewater. Transiently abundant organisms were also identified. Among them the genus Nitrotoga (class Betaproteobacteria) was the most abundant putative nitrite oxidizer in a number of activated sludge plants, which challenges previous assumptions that Nitrospira (phylum Nitrospirae) are the primary nitrite-oxidizers in activated sludge systems with nutrient removal.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26262816 View in PubMed
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Characterization of the bacterial communities on recent Icelandic volcanic deposits of different ages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299615
Source
BMC Microbiol. 2018 09 24; 18(1):122
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-24-2018
Author
Bo Byloos
Pieter Monsieurs
Mohamed Mysara
Natalie Leys
Nico Boon
Rob Van Houdt
Author Affiliation
Microbiology Unit, Interdisciplinary Biosciences, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCKā€¢CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400, Mol, Belgium.
Source
BMC Microbiol. 2018 09 24; 18(1):122
Date
09-24-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Biodiversity
Carbon - analysis - metabolism
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Iceland
Nitrogen - analysis - metabolism
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Soil Microbiology
Volcanic Eruptions - analysis
Abstract
Basalt is the most common igneous rock on the Earth's surface covering. Basalt-associated microorganisms drive the cycling and sequestration of different elements such as nitrogen, carbon and other nutrients, which facilitate subsequent pioneer and plant development, impacting long-term regulation of the Earth's temperature and biosphere. The initial processes of colonization and subsequent rock weathering by microbial communities are still poorly understood and relatively few data are available on the diversity and richness of the communities inhabiting successive and chronological lava flows. In this study, the bacterial communities present on lava deposits from different eruptions of the 1975-84 Krafla Fires (32-, 35- and 39-year old, respectively) at the Krafla, Iceland, were determined.
Three sites were sampled for each deposit (32-, 35- and 39-year old), two proximal sites (at 10 m distance) and one more distant site (at 100 m from the two other sites). The determined chemical composition and metal concentrations were similar for the three basalt deposits. No significant differences were observed in the total number of cells in each flow. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing showed that the most abundant classified phylum across the 3 flows was Proteobacteria, although predominance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes was observed for some sampling sites. In addition, a considerable fraction of the operational taxonomic units remained unclassified. Alpha diversity (Shannon, inverse Simpson and Chao), HOMOVA and AMOVA only showed a significant difference for Shannon between the 32- and 39-year old flow (p 
PubMed ID
30249184 View in PubMed
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Culturable endophytic microbial communities in the circumpolar grass, Deschampsia flexuosa in a sub-Arctic inland primary succession are habitat and growth stage specific.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264574
Source
Environ Microbiol Rep. 2015 Feb;7(1):111-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Anbu Poosakkannu
Riitta Nissinen
Minna-Maarit Kytöviita
Source
Environ Microbiol Rep. 2015 Feb;7(1):111-22
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Biodiversity
Ecosystem
Endophytes - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Poaceae - growth & development - microbiology
Abstract
Little is known about endophytic microbes in cold climate plants and how their communities are formed.We compared culturable putative endophytic bacteria and fungi in the ecologically important circumpolargrass, Deschampsia flexuosa growing in two successional stages of subarctic sand dune (68°29'N).Sequence analyses of partial 16S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of culturable endophytes showed that diverse bacteria and fungi inhabit different tissues of D. flexuosa. A total of 178 bacterial isolates representing seven taxonomic divisions, Alpha, Beta and Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Acidobacteria, and 30 fungal isolates representing the phylum Ascomycota were identified. Several endophytes were affiliated with specific plant tissues or successional stages. This first report of bacterial endophytes in D. flexuosa revealed that the genus Pseudomonas is tightly associated with D. flexuosa, and encompassed 39% of the bacterial isolates, and 58% of seed isolates. Based on 16S rRNA and ITS sequence data, most of the D. flexuosa endophytes were closely related to microbes from other cold environments. The majority of seed endophytic bacterial isolates were able to solubilize organic form of phosphate suggesting that these endophytes could play a role in resource mobilization in germinating seeds in nutrient-poor habitat.
PubMed ID
25721603 View in PubMed
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Isolation and characterization of humic substances-degrading bacteria from the subarctic Alaska grasslands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265841
Source
J Basic Microbiol. 2015 Jan;55(1):54-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Ha Ju Park
Dockyu Kim
Source
J Basic Microbiol. 2015 Jan;55(1):54-61
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Bacteria - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
Carbon - analysis
Grassland
Humic Substances - analysis
Paenibacillus - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
Pseudomonas - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Soil Microbiology
Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared
Abstract
Humic substances (HS), an important fraction of soil organic carbon, are distributed widely throughout cold environments. A total of cold-adapted 122 bacterial strains were isolated from 66 Alaska grassland soil samples based on their ability to grow on humic acids (HA), a main fraction of HS, as a carbon and energy source. These isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, with class Bacilli (79.5%) and ?-Proteobacteria (17.1%) comprising the largest groups. Among them, 45 strains, mainly Paenibacillus (27 strains) and Pseudomonas (15 strains), were selected for further screening. Two strains (Pseudomonas sp. PAMC 26793 and Paenibacillus sp. PAMC 26794) most efficiently degraded HA, but showed significant differences in their ability to grow on various monocyclic aromatics, which are putative degradative metabolites of HS. Fourier transform infrared spectra also showed substantial but different changes in HA chemical structure after incubation with each strain. Gel permeation chromatography demonstrated that depolymerization and polymerization of HA occurred during HS degradation by these newly isolated microbes.
PubMed ID
23788029 View in PubMed
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PCR-based detection of non-indigenous microorganisms in 'pristine' environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186149
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2003 May;53(2):157-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Gillian C Baker
Lemese Ah Tow
Don A Cowan
Author Affiliation
Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville, Cape Town, South Africa. gbaker@uwc.ac.za
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2003 May;53(2):157-64
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antarctic Regions
Bacteria - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
DNA Primers
Ecosystem
Environmental Microbiology
Environmental pollution
Humans
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Abstract
PCR-based technologies are widely employed for the detection of specific microorganisms, and may be applied to the identification of non-indigenous microorganisms in 'pristine' environments. For 'pristine' environments such as those found on the Antarctic continent, the application of these methods to the assessment of environmental contamination from human activities must be treated with caution. Issues such as the possibility of non-human dispersal of organisms, stability and survival of non-indigenous organisms in vivo, the sensitivity, reproducibility and specificity of the PCR process (and particularly primer design) and the sampling regime employed must all be considered in detail. We conclude that despite these limitations, PCR and related technologies offer enormous scope for assessment of both natural and non-indigenous microbial distributions.
PubMed ID
12654487 View in PubMed
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[Roseibacula alcaliphilum gen. nov. sp. nov., a new alkaliphilic aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium from a meromictic soda Lake Doroninskoe (East Siberia, Russia)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262070
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2014 Jul-Aug;83(4):456-66
Publication Type
Article
Author
E N Nuianzina-Boldareva
V M Gorlenko
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2014 Jul-Aug;83(4):456-66
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Lakes - microbiology
RNA, Bacterial - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Siberia
Water Microbiology
Abstract
A bacterial strain De was isolated from the surface water layer of the meromictic soda lake Doroninskoe. When grown in the dark, it formed-pink colonies on agar media. The cells were nonmotile, contained bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids. Stationary-phase cells contained intracellular vesicular membranes similar to the membranes of the photosynthetic apparatus of some ndnsulfur purple bacteria. Aerobic growth did not occur. Sucrose, citrate, mannitol, sorbitol, case in hydrolysate,and yeast extract were the preferable substrates for aerobic growth, Xylose, lactose, aspartate, benzoate, malate, malonate, succinate, tartrate, formate, fumarate, glycerol, methanol, and ethanol were not utilized; Growth occurred at up to 50.g/L NaCl (optimum at 5 g/L) and pH 9.8. According to the 16S rRNA gene sequencing, similarity between the isolate and the known alkaliphilic genera of nonsulfur purple bacteria (Rhodobaca) and of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (Roseinatronobacter) was 96%, which was sufficient for description ofa new genus of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The name Roseibacula alcaliphiluin gen. nov., sp. nov. was, proposed for the isolate.
PubMed ID
25844457 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.