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Accuracy of self-reported body weight compared to measured body weight. A population survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235826
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
L. Jalkanen
J. Tuomilehto
A. Tanskanen
P. Puska
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Blood pressure
Body Weight
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
In 1977, in the evaluation of the prevention programme for cardiovascular diseases, 11,880 persons in Eastern Finland were asked to report their own weight on a questionnaire. Each participant was weighted during the following clinical examination. The data of the self-reported body weight were analysed according to sex, age, measured weight and body-mass index (BMI). The results showed that older people underestimated their weight to a greater extent than did younger people of both sexes. The error between measured and self-reported weight was greater in heavier subjects than in thinner individuals. In both sexes weight estimate error (measured weight minus self-reported weight) correlated more strongly with high BMI than with measured weight. Associations between weight estimate error and other variables were studied using a multiple regression model. Men whose annual family income was low were more likely to underestimate their weight than the men with a high annual income. In general, women reported their weight more correctly than men did. Older women were more likely to report their weight less than younger women, whereas women who visited their doctor frequently or who had higher annual family incomes were more aware of their actual body weight than those who had few doctor's consultations or whose family income was low. In men 5.2% and in women 8.3% of the variation in the weight estimate error was explained by the regression model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3616534 View in PubMed
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The adaptation of an adult group screening test for dyslexia into Finland-Swedish: normative data for university students and the effects of language background on test performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84750
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Lindgrén Signe-Anita
Laine Matti
Author Affiliation
Abo Akademi University, Turku, Finland. signe-anita.lindgren@abo.fi
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Cultural Characteristics
Dyslexia - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Memory
Multilingualism
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Phonetics
ROC Curve
Self Disclosure
Students - psychology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Vocabulary
Abstract
We present a Finland-Swedish adaptation of the Sweden-Swedish group screening test for dyslexia for adults and young adults DUVAN (Lundberg & Wolff, 2003) together with normative data from 143 Finland-Swedish university students. The test is based on the widely held phonological deficit hypothesis of dyslexia and consists of a self-report and five subtests tapping phonological working memory, phonological representation, phonological awareness, and orthographic skill. We describe the test adaptation procedure and show that the internal reliability of the new test version is comparable to the original one. Our results indicate that the language background (Swedish, Finnish, early simultaneous Swedish-Finnish bilingualism) should be taken into account when interpreting the results on the Finland-Swedish DUVAN test. We show that the FS-DUVAN differentiates a group of students with dyslexia diagnosis from normals, and that a low performance on the FS-DUVAN correlates with a positive self-report on familial dyslexia and with a history of special education in school. Finally, we analyze the sensitivity and specificity of the FS-DUVAN for dyslexia among university students.
PubMed ID
17877557 View in PubMed
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The adoption of emergency contraceptive pills in Sweden: a repeated cross-sectional study among abortion applicants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80966
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(9):1142-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006

Affective and cognitive attitudes, uncertainty avoidance and intention to obtain genetic testing: an extension of the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136743
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Sep;26(9):1143-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Katharina Wolff
Karin Nordin
Wibecke Brun
Gunilla Berglund
Gerd Kvale
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Christiesgate 12, Bergen, Norway. katharina.wolff@psysp.uib.no
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Sep;26(9):1143-55
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Attitude to Health
Awareness
Culture
Defense Mechanisms
Female
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - genetics - mortality - psychology
Genetic Testing
Humans
Intention
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Norway
Penetrance
Psychological Theory
Questionnaires
Survival
Uncertainty
Abstract
To ensure successful implementation of genetic screening and counselling according to patients best interests, the attitudes and motives of the public are important to consider. The aim of this study was to apply a theoretical framework in order to investigate which individual and disease characteristics might facilitate the uptake of genetic testing. A questionnaire using an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour was developed to assess the predictive value of affective and cognitive expected outcomes, subjective norms, perceived control and uncertainty avoidance on the intention to undergo genetic testing. In addition to these individual characteristics, the predictive power of two disease characteristics was investigated by systematically varying the diseases fatality and penetrance (i.e. the probability of getting ill in case one is a mutation carrier). This resulted in four versions of the questionnaire which was mailed to a random sample of 2400 Norwegians. Results showed genetic test interest to be quite high, and to vary depending on the characteristics of the disease, with participants preferring tests for highly penetrant diseases. The most important individual predictor was uncertainty avoidance.
PubMed ID
21347976 View in PubMed
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A-FROM in action at the Aphasia Institute.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130778
Source
Semin Speech Lang. 2011 Aug;32(3):216-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Aura Kagan
Author Affiliation
Education and Applied Research, Aphasia Institute, Toronto, Canada. akagan@aphasia.ca
Source
Semin Speech Lang. 2011 Aug;32(3):216-28
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aphasia - psychology - rehabilitation
Awareness
Communication
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Motivation
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - trends
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Care Planning
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Family Relations
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality Indicators, Health Care - trends
Rehabilitation Centers - trends
Treatment Outcome
World Health Organization
Abstract
Aphasia centers are in an excellent position to contribute to the broad definition of health by the World Health Organization: the ability to live life to its full potential. An expansion of this definition by the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) forms the basis for a user-friendly and ICF-compatible framework for planning interventions that ensure maximum real-life outcome and impact for people with aphasia and their families. This article describes Living with Aphasia: Framework for Outcome Measurement and its practical application to aphasia centers in the areas of direct service, outcome measurement, and advocacy and awareness. Examples will be drawn from the Aphasia Institute in Toronto. A case will be made for all aphasia centers to use the ICF or an adaptation of it to further the work of this sector and strengthen its credibility.
PubMed ID
21968558 View in PubMed
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"After all the traumas my body has been through, I feel good that it is still working."--Basic Body Awareness Therapy for traumatised refugees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270470
Source
Torture. 2015;25(1):33-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Kajsa Stade
Signe Skammeritz
Charlotte Hjortkjær
Jessica Carlsson
Source
Torture. 2015;25(1):33-50
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awareness
Denmark - epidemiology
Emotions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Therapy Modalities
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Quality of Life - psychology
Refugees - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) is a form of physiotherapy that is often used for psychiatric patients in Scandinavian countries. To our knowledge there has not been any studies investigating BBAT as a treatment for traumatised refugees until now.
To explore the compliance, acceptability and treatment satisfaction using group BBAT in traumatised refugees. To study changes in psychiatric and somatic symptoms as well as quality of life, level of functioning and quality of movement during treatment with BBAT.
All Arabic speaking patients that previously had received treatment at the Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry in Copenhagen from April 2008 to June 2009 were invited to participate (N=29). Nine persons were included in a male (N=4) and female (N=5) group. All participants were traumatised refugees. The BBAT treatment consisted of 14 sessions over a period of 14 weeks. Before and after treatment the participants were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The interviews were transcribed and analysed with a thematic approach. The participants also filled out self-administrated questionnaires and two physiotherapists tested the participants' movement harmony using the Body Awareness Rating Scale-Movement Harmony (BARS-MH) test. At the end of the study, the participants filled out anonymous questionnaires about treatment satisfaction.
The results showed that the participants had a high compliance, acceptability and treatment satisfaction with BBAT. The majority of participants showed improvements in symptoms from baseline to post-intervention on the self-administrated questionnaires and in the BARS-MH test.
Further research is needed to expand the scientific knowledge regarding the use of BBAT in traumatised refugees. If future research can confirm our positive findings it will have a considerable impact on future treatment designs and for the individual patient.
PubMed ID
26021346 View in PubMed
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AIDS education and prevention by the James Bay Cree

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102284
Source
Pages 732-735 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Services of James Bay, Chisasibi, Quebec, Canada. Abstract: Although no cases of AIDS have yet been reported amongst the 10,000 Cree of Eastern James Bay, certain characteristics of the population signal that it is at risk for developing a "pattern II" AIDS epidemic. The AIDS Awareness Program for the
  1 document  
Author
Smeja, C
Valverde, C
Petawabano, B
Author Affiliation
Northern Quebec Module, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay, Chisasibi, Quebec, Canada
Source
Pages 732-735 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
AIDS education
Awareness
Community
Cree
Culturally appropriate intervention
James Bay
Prevention
Rates
Abstract
Although no cases of AIDS have yet been reported amongst the 10,000 Cree of Eastern James Bay, certain characteristics of the population signal that it is at risk for developing a "pattern II" AIDS epidemic. The AIDS Awareness Program for the region is community based, with each local team of AIDS educators planning, managing, and evaluating prevention activities according to their assessment of the needs of the community. This decentralized approach ensures that interventions are culturally appropriate and relevant, and is empowering to the community.
Documents
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Alaskans' knowledge and attitudes about AIDS and HIV

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87878
Source
State of Alaska Epidemiology Bulletin Bulletin No. 2, January 7, 1993
Date
1993
  1 website  
Author
Cordes, Penelope
Author Affiliation
Section of Epidemiology
Source
State of Alaska Epidemiology Bulletin Bulletin No. 2, January 7, 1993
Date
1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Keywords
AIDS, Alaska, AIDS awareness, AIDS survey
Abstract
In January 1992, 502 Alaska adults (age 18 and over) were surveyed by telephone regarding their knowledge of AIDS, HIV transmission, and HIV testing
Notes
Survey conducted by Hellenthal and Associates, Inc., Anchorage
Online Resources
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Alcohol consumption and time to recognition of pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168892
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2006 Nov;10(6):467-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Erika M Edwards
Martha M Werler
Author Affiliation
Data Coordinating Center, Boston University School of Public Health, 715 Albany St, 580, Boston, MA 02118, USA. eedwards@bu.edu
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2006 Nov;10(6):467-72
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Awareness
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Menstrual Cycle - drug effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unplanned
Pregnant Women - psychology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk-Taking
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite warnings to abstain from alcohol, American women who are or could become pregnant still drink. This study evaluates whether women who consume alcohol are at an increased risk of recognizing pregnancy later than women who do not, adjusting for confounding factors that have been associated with alcohol consumption during pregnancy.
The sample included 863 control women from a multisite case-control study conducted from 1996 to 2002 in the United States and Canada. Telephone interviews were conducted with mothers by trained nurse interviewers who administered standardized questionnaires on demographic and reproductive factors, and pregnancy exposures.
Alcohol consumption was classified as none (42.0%), occasional (31.9%), regular (15.6%), and heavy (10.5%). Time to recognition of pregnancy was calculated as the date pregnancy was suspected minus the last menstrual period date (median: 31 days; range: 7-227 days). Unadjusted Cox proportional hazard models found that regular drinkers, but not heavy drinkers, had a significantly higher risk of recognizing pregnancy later than non-drinkers. However, this association went away after adjustment for demographic factors. Among women with unplanned pregnancies, heavy alcohol intake was associated with a 45% increased hazard ratio, compared to 0.80 for women with planned pregnancies; however, this finding was not statistically significant.
While time to pregnancy recognition did not vary among drinkers and non-drinkers, results from this study reiterate previous findings that pregnant women consume alcohol, and that drinkers share social and demographic characteristics that could be used to target public health interventions.
PubMed ID
16763772 View in PubMed
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Amur tiger conservation education program: A pilot study on program effectiveness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271312
Source
Integr Zool. 2015 Jul;10(4):403-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Anna S Mukhacheva
Vasilissa V Derugina
Galina D Maksimova
Svetlana V Soutyrina
Source
Integr Zool. 2015 Jul;10(4):403-7
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Attitude
Awareness
Child
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Education, Nonprofessional
Female
Humans
Male
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Rural Population
Schools
Siberia
Tigers
Abstract
Anthropogenic impacts are the primary threats to Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) and their habitat. Villagers living in proximity to tigers tend to view them negatively and, often, as a source of revenue on black markets. We aim to reduce human-tiger conflict by working with young students of Ternei County in the heart of tiger habitat in Primorskii Krai (Province). To inform and influence Ternei County's future decision-makers, we developed "Safe Conduct", a year-long education program held in 6 villages, culminating in a multi-school conference. We tested the efficacy of Safe Conduct as a potential model for tiger conservation educational programs. We measured levels of student knowledge about tiger ecology, their attitude towards tigers, and their willingness to engage in tiger conservation activites prior to, immediately after and 6 months following the completion of our program. Results supported the fundamental premise of Safe Conduct that knowledge and attitude towards tigers are correlated. Knowledge of tiger ecology and attitude towards tigers increased by the project's completion; both remained high after 6 months. However, commitment to participation in conservation efforts rose temporarily post-program and then dropped. Results varied by village. We recommend that the reasons for the high performance measures of students in 2 villages be investigated, and that lessons learned be applied to villages that underperformed. Safe Conduct represents a potential model for environmental education programs in Ternei County and elsewhere to educate future generations, to eventually develop a strong commitment to Amur tiger conservation at the community level.
PubMed ID
26096458 View in PubMed
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356 records – page 1 of 36.