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215 records – page 1 of 22.

229 people, 15,000 body parts: pathologists help solve Swissair 111's grisly puzzles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203179
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-1999
Author
N. Robb
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Date
Jan-26-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Coroners and Medical Examiners - psychology
DNA Fingerprinting
Family - psychology
Grief
Humans
Nova Scotia
Professional-Family Relations
Abstract
Only 1 of the 229 passengers and crew members killed when Swissair Flight 111 crashed off Nova Scotia in September was visually identifiable. Identifying everyone else on board involved medical and dental detective work of the first order.
PubMed ID
9951448 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accidents as a cause of death 1901-1965]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44538
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1968 Jun 1;88(11):1022-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1968

Acute posttraumatic stress symptoms and depression after exposure to the 2005 Saskatchewan Centennial Air Show disaster: prevalence and predictors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157097
Source
Am J Disaster Med. 2007 Sep-Oct;2(5):217-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Steven Taylor
Gordon J G Asmundson
R Nicholas Carleton
Peter Brundin
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Disaster Med. 2007 Sep-Oct;2(5):217-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation - psychology
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Disasters
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Saskatchewan
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of acute distress-that is, clinically significant posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and depression-and to identify predictors of each in a sample of people who witnessed a fatal aircraft collision at the 2005 Saskatchewan Centennial Air Show.
Air Show attendees (N = 157) were recruited by advertisements in the local media and completed an Internet-administered battery of questionnaires.
Based on previously established cut-offs, 22 percent respondents had clinically significant PTSS and 24 percent had clinically significant depressive symptoms. Clinically significant symptoms were associated with posttrauma impairment in social and occupational functioning. Acute distress was associated with several variables, including aspects of Air Show trauma exposure, severity of prior trauma exposure, low posttrauma social support (ie, negative responses by others), indices of poor coping (eg, intolerance of uncertainty, rumination about the trauma), and elevated scores on anxiety sensitivity, the personality trait of absorption, and dissociative tendencies.
Results suggest that clinically significant acute distress is common in the aftermath of witnessed trauma. The statistical predictors (correlates) of acute distress were generally consistent with the results of studies of other forms of trauma. People with elevated scores on theoretical vulnerability factors (eg, elevated anxiety sensitivity) were particularly likely to develop acute distress.
PubMed ID
18491838 View in PubMed
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[A disaster in a local community. Experiences following an airplane crash in Spitsbergen]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73976
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1988 Feb 20;108(5):407-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1988
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1984 Apr;55(4):337-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1984
Author
J R Popplow
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1984 Apr;55(4):337-8
Date
Apr-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation
Aerospace Medicine
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Canada
Fires
Humans
Abstract
A hypothetical aircraft accident scenario is described in which the pilot survives but some of the passengers are fatally injured. Information is provided on the acute situational anxiety that may occur in aircrew after any aviation accident, especially one in which lives are lost. A course of action is discussed which encourages early recognition and treatment of the potentially debilitating phenomenon termed "post-accident anxiety syndrome".
PubMed ID
6732687 View in PubMed
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[Air ambulance services--a dangerous place of work?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103137
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 Feb 22;78(3):20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1990
Author
K I Fanghol
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 Feb 22;78(3):20
Date
Feb-22-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation
Aircraft
Ambulances
Humans
Norway
Risk factors
Transportation of Patients
PubMed ID
2109895 View in PubMed
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Aircraft accidents and other causes of death among Norwegian commercial pilots.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19100
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2002 Jun;73(6):587-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Tor Haldorsen
Jon B Reitan
Ulf Tveten
Author Affiliation
The Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo. tor.haldorsen@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2002 Jun;73(6):587-92
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation - mortality
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Aged
Cause of Death
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: When entering the profession, pilots need to be in better health than the general population. During their careers they are under close medical supervision, which could influence their life-long mortality. METHODS: The cohort was established from the files of the Norwegian Civil Aviation Administration and included people who had valid licenses as commercial pilots between 1946 and 1994. Basic data about their flight careers were recorded. The cohort was linked to the Cause of Death Registry. The observed number of deaths was compared with those expected, based on national rates. RESULTS: A group of 3707 male pilots was followed over 70,832 person-years. There were 342 deaths vs. 362.8 expected, with a standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of 0.94, and a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 0.85-1.05. Aircraft accidents with 97 deaths had a major influence on total mortality and the SMR for all other causes was 0.68 (95% CI 0.59-0.77). The SMR for cancer was 0.89 (95% CI 0.71-1.11) and for circulatory diseases 0.53 (95% CI 0.42-0.67). The highest SMR for total mortality in pilots
PubMed ID
12056676 View in PubMed
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Aircraft-Assisted Pilot Suicides: Lessons to be Learned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257750
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2014 Aug;85(8):841-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Alpo Vuorio
Tanja Laukkala
Pooshan Navathe
Bruce Budowle
Anne Eyre
Antti Sajantila
Author Affiliation
Mehiläinen Airport Health Centre, Vantaa and Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Lappeenranta, Finland.
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2014 Aug;85(8):841-6
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Aged
Aircraft
Autopsy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Suicidal ideation
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Aircraft assisted suicides were studied in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, and Finland during 1956-2012 by means of literature search and accident case analysis. According to our study the frequency varied slightly between the studies. Overall, the new estimate of aircraft assisted suicides in the United States in a 20-yr period (1993-2012) is 0.33% (95% CI 0.21-0.49) (24/7244). In the detailed accident case analysis, it was found that in five out of the eight cases from the United States, someone knew of prior suicidal ideation before the aircraft assisted fatality. The caveats of standard medico-legal autopsy and accident investigation methods in investigation of suspected aircraft assisted suicides are discussed. It is suggested that a psychological autopsy should be performed in all such cases. Also the social context and possibilities of the prevention of aviation-related suicides were analyzed. In addition, some recent aircraft assisted suicides carried out using commercial aircraft during scheduled services and causing many casualties are discussed.
PubMed ID
25199127 View in PubMed
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215 records – page 1 of 22.