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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cereal byproducts have prebiotic potential in mice fed a high-fat diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261577
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Aug 13;62(32):8169-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-2014
Author
Karin Berger
Peter Falck
Caroline Linninge
Ulf Nilsson
Ulrika Axling
Carl Grey
Henrik Stålbrand
Eva Nordberg Karlsson
Margareta Nyman
Cecilia Holm
Patrick Adlercreutz
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Aug 13;62(32):8169-78
Date
Aug-13-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa - chemistry
Bifidobacterium - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
Cecum - metabolism - microbiology
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects
Fatty Acids, Volatile - metabolism
Food-Processing Industry - economics
Hordeum - chemistry
Hot Temperature
Hydrolysis
Industrial Waste - analysis - economics
Insulin Resistance
Intestinal Mucosa - metabolism - microbiology
Lactobacillaceae - growth & development - isolation & purification - metabolism
Male
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Obesity - diet therapy - etiology - metabolism - microbiology
Prebiotics - economics
Secale cereale - chemistry
Sweden
Abstract
Barley husks, rye bran, and a fiber residue from oat milk production were processed by heat pretreatment, various separation steps, and treatment with an endoxylanase in order to improve the prebiotic potential of these cereal byproducts. Metabolic functions were intended to improve along with improved microbial activity. The products obtained were included in a high-fat mouse diet so that all diets contained 5% dietary fiber. In addition, high-fat and low-fat controls as well as partially hydrolyzed guar gum were included in the study. The soluble fiber product obtained from rye bran caused a significant increase in the bifidobacteria (log copies of 16S rRNA genes; median (25-75 percentile): 6.38 (6.04-6.66) and 7.47 (7.30-7.74), respectively; p
PubMed ID
25041844 View in PubMed
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Changes in serum lipids and postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations after consumption of beverages with beta-glucans from oats or barley: a randomised dose-controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173861
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Nov;59(11):1272-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
M. Biörklund
A. van Rees
R P Mensink
G. Onning
Author Affiliation
Biomedical Nutrition, Center for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Nov;59(11):1272-81
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Avena sativa
Beverages
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Food, Fortified
Hordeum
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - diet therapy
Insulin - blood
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Phytotherapy - methods
Postprandial Period - drug effects
Single-Blind Method
Sweden
beta-Glucans - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Abstract
To investigate side by side the effects on serum lipoproteins and postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations of beverages enriched with 5 or 10 g of beta-glucans from oats or barley.
An 8-week single blind, controlled study with five parallel groups carried out at two centres under identical conditions.
A total of 100 free-living hypercholesterolaemic subjects were recruited locally and 89 completed the study.
During a 3-week run-in period all subjects consumed a control beverage. For the following 5-week period four groups received a beverage with 5 or 10 g beta-glucans from oats or barley and one group continued with the control beverage. Blood samples in weeks 0, 2, 3, 7 and 8 were analysed for serum lipids, lipoproteins, glucose and insulin. Postprandial concentrations of glucose and insulin were compared between control and the beverage with 5 g of beta-glucans from oats or barley.
Compared to control, 5 g of beta-glucans from oats significantly lowered total-cholesterol by 7.4% (P
PubMed ID
16015250 View in PubMed
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Consumption of pure oats by individuals with celiac disease: a position statement by the Canadian Celiac Association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160744
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Oct;21(10):649-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Mohsin Rashid
Decker Butzner
Vernon Burrows
Marion Zarkadas
Shelley Case
Mavis Molloy
Ralph Warren
Olga Pulido
Connie Switzer
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. mohsin.rashid@iwk.nshealth.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Oct;21(10):649-51
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Avena sativa
Canada
Celiac Disease - diet therapy
Child
Diet
Food Contamination
Food Hypersensitivity
Glutens - toxicity
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - chemistry
Nutritional Sciences
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The treatment of celiac disease is a strict adherence to a gluten-free diet for life. In the past, oats were considered to be toxic to individuals with celiac disease and were not allowed in a gluten-free diet. However, recent evidence suggests that oats that are pure and uncontaminated with other gluten-containing grains, if taken in limited quantities, are safe for most individuals with celiac disease. For adults, up to 70 g (1/2 to 3/4 cup) of oats per day and for children, up to 25 g (1/4 cup) per day are safe to consume. These oats and oat products must fulfill the standards for a gluten-free diet set by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Health Canada. The Canadian Celiac Association, in consultation with Health Canada, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, has established requirements for growing, processing, and purity testing and labelling of pure oats. These strategies have led to the production of pure, uncontaminated oats for the first time in Canada. Oats and oat products that are safe for consumption by individuals with celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis are now commercially available in Canada.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2004 Jan;39(1):27-3114992558
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Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Jan 28;340(4):3219935353
PubMed ID
17948135 View in PubMed
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Effect of oat bran supplemented diet on hypercholesterolaemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215076
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1995 Jun;13(2):118-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
I. Winblad
T. Joensuu
H. Korpela
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1995 Jun;13(2):118-21
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Avena sativa
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Finland
Food, Fortified
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - diet therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
To examine the effect of oat bran supplemented diet on serum cholesterol in hypercholesterolaemic males who had failed to comply with a conventional lipid lowering diet.
Run-in period with a conventional lipid lowering diet followed by supplements of oat bran (70 g per day) for six weeks. Wash-out period without oat bran ended the survey.
The workplace of Pyhäsalmi Mine, Finland.
59 volunteer male miners whose serum cholesterol was over 6.1 mmol/l in spite of a conventional lipid lowering diet.
Differences between means for serum cholesterol concentrations at different phases of the survey.
During the oat bran supplemented diet serum total cholesterol decreased by 6.2%, from 6.93 to 6.50 mmol/l (p = 0.000) and LDL cholesterol by 9.5%, from 4.64 to 4.20 mmol/l (p = 0.000). During the wash-out phase serum total cholesterol increased by 2.3%, to 6.65 mmol/l (p = 0.084) and LDL cholesterol by 5.0%, to 4.41 mmol/l (p = 0.021). The reduction in cholesterol levels on oat bran supplement correlated positively with the pre-treatment values.
Oat bran seems to offer an additional dietary means of coping with hypercholesterolaemia.
PubMed ID
7569475 View in PubMed
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Gluten contamination in the Canadian commercial oat supply.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134095
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):705-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
T B Koerner
C. Cléroux
C. Poirier
I. Cantin
A. Alimkulov
H. Elamparo
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada. Terry.Koerner@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):705-10
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Avena sativa - chemistry
Canada
Celiac Disease - diet therapy
Cereals - chemistry - economics - standards
Diet, Gluten-Free - economics - standards
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Food Contamination
Food Hypersensitivity - diet therapy
Food Labeling - standards
Food, Organic - analysis - economics - standards
Glutens - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Legislation, Food
Limit of Detection
Seasons
Seeds - chemistry
Abstract
A growing body of evidence suggests that a majority of people with celiac disease and on a gluten-free diet can safely consume pure oats in moderate amounts; however, previous studies have indicated that the commercial oat supply in other countries, and in Canada to some extent, is contaminated with other grains. This study has confirmed that the commercial oat supply in Canada is heavily contaminated with gluten from other grains. Approximately 88% of the oat samples (n = 133) were contaminated above 20 mg kg(-1) and there were no differences between the oat types tested. Only one gluten-free variety of oats was analysed and it consistently provided negative results in all analyses. It is difficult to determine where the contamination originates, but there are possibilities for cross-contamination in the field, in the transport of the grain, in the storage of the grain, and in the milling and packaging facilities. It is clear from this study that only those products that have been certified 'pure' oats would be appropriate for a gluten-free diet.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Jan 17;346(3):180-811796853
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010 Feb;125(2 Suppl 2):S116-2520042231
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PubMed ID
21623493 View in PubMed
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Ochratoxin A in Danish cereals 1986-1992 and daily intake by the Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75597
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1996 Jan;13(1):95-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
K. Jørgensen
G. Rasmussen
I. Thorup
Author Affiliation
Institute of Food Chemistry and Nutrition, National Food Agency of Denmark, Søborg, Denmark.
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1996 Jan;13(1):95-104
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Avena sativa - chemistry
Cereals - chemistry
Denmark
Food contamination - analysis
Hordeum - chemistry
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Mycotoxins - administration & dosage - analysis
Ochratoxins - administration & dosage - analysis
Secale cereale - chemistry
Time Factors
Triticum - chemistry
Abstract
Ochratoxin A is a common contaminant in Danish cereals, and surveillance of ochratoxin A in cereals has been a part of the Danish monitoring system since 1986. Occurrence of ochratoxin A is highly related to the climatic conditions during harvest. Rye is the crop which is most often contaminated and contains the highest levels of ochratoxin A. The result of the survey period from 1986 to 1992 (total of 1431 samples) together with food consumption data is the basis of intake calculations. Especially in years with wet weather during harvest, the daily intake of ochratoxin A for some individuals in the Danish population could reach levels which exceed the tolerable daily intake (TDI) for ochratoxin A of 5 ng/kg bw suggested by The Nordic Working Group on Food Toxicology and Risk Evaluation. A maximum limit of 5 micrograms ochratoxin A per kg cereal would keep the daily intake below 5 ng/kg bw.
Notes
Erratum In: Food Addit Contam 1996 May-Jun;13(4):476
PubMed ID
8647311 View in PubMed
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Ochratoxin A producing Penicillium verrucosum isolates from cereals reveal large AFLP fingerprinting variability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75485
Source
J Appl Microbiol. 2005;98(3):684-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
J C Frisvad
F. Lund
S. Elmholt
Author Affiliation
Center for Microbial Biotechnology, Biocentrum-DTU, Søltofts Plads, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark. jcf@biocentrum.dtu.dk
Source
J Appl Microbiol. 2005;98(3):684-92
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Avena sativa
Cereals
DNA Fingerprinting
Denmark
Genes, Fungal
Great Britain
Hordeum
Industrial Microbiology
Ochratoxins - biosynthesis
Penicillium - genetics - metabolism
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Triticum
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
AIMS: To examine if molecular amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting of the only ochratoxin A-producing species in European cereals, Penicillium verrucosum, can be used as a method in hazard analysis using critical control points (HACCP). METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 321 isolates of P. verrucosum were isolated from ochratoxin A-contaminated cereals from Denmark (oats), UK (wheat and barley) and Sweden (wheat). Of these, 236 produced ochratoxin A as determined by thin layer chromatography; 185 ochratoxin A-producing isolates were selected for AFLP fingerprinting. A total of 138 isolates had unique AFLP patterns, whereas 52 isolates could be allocated to small groups containing from two to four isolates with similar AFLP patterns. A total of 155 clones were found among the 185 P. verrucosum isolates, thus 84% of the isolates may represent different genets of P. verrucosum. As the few isolates that were grouped often came from the same farm, and those groups that contained AFLP-identical isolates from different countries were morphotypically different. On single farms up to 35 clones were found. The few groups of ramets from the same genet indicated that a HACCP approach based on clones may require a very large number of AFLP analysis to work in practice, we recommend basing the HACCP approach on the actual species P. verrucosum. A more detailed characterization should rather be based on the profile of species present at different control points, or analysis of the mycotoxins ochratoxin A and citrinin in the isolates. Examination of 86 isolates with HPLC and diode array detection of P. verrucosum showed that 66% produced ochratoxin A, 87% produced citrinin, 92% produced verrucin and 100% produced verrucolone. CONCLUSIONS: Among 184 ochratoxin A-producing Penicillium verrucosum, 155 clonal lineages were indicated by AFLP fingerprinting, indicating a high genetical diversity, yet the species P. verrucosum is phenotypically distinct and valid. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: AFLP fingerprinting of Penicillium verrucosum indicates that genetic recombination takes place in this fungus.
PubMed ID
15715872 View in PubMed
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Prospective study of clinical and histological safety of pure and uncontaminated Canadian oats in the management of celiac disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134043
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2011 Jul;35(4):459-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Michael Sai Lai Sey
Jeremy Parfitt
Jamie Gregor
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. msey2@uwo.ca
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2011 Jul;35(4):459-64
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Avena sativa - chemistry
Canada
Celiac Disease - diet therapy
Consumer Product Safety
Diet, Gluten-Free
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food contamination - analysis
Glutens
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Pure oats are safe for most patients with celiac disease, but concerns regarding contamination by other grains limit their consumption. The Canadian Celiac Association recently released guidelines governing the production of pure oats. The objective was to test the safety of a product manufactured under these guidelines.
Fifteen adults with established, biopsy-confirmed celiac disease of = 1 year duration were challenged with 350 g/wk of pure oats for 12 weeks. Symptom scores, weight, hemoglobin, ferritin, albumin, and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) were assessed at weeks 0, 6, and 12. Duodenal biopsies were obtained before and after oat challenge and assessed based on the modified Marsh-Oberhuber score. Compliance with a gluten-free diet was monitored with random food diaries.
Fifteen patients completed the study and were analyzed in intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses. There were no significant changes in symptom scores, weight, hemoglobin, ferritin, or albumin during oat consumption. The tTG remained negative in all patients, and the histology scores did not significantly change during oat challenge. The only relapse occurred in a patient who became noncompliant with her gluten-free diet.
The findings support the safety of pure, uncontaminated oats manufactured under Canadian Celiac Association guidelines for patients with celiac disease.
Notes
Comment In: JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2011 Jul;35(4):447-821700965
PubMed ID
21628610 View in PubMed
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Risk assessment of coumarin using the bench mark dose (BMD) approach: children in Norway which regularly eat oatmeal porridge with cinnamon may exceed the TDI for coumarin with several folds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128685
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2012 Mar;50(3-4):903-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
T Ø Fotland
J E Paulsen
T. Sanner
J. Alexander
T. Husøy
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2012 Mar;50(3-4):903-12
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Avena sativa - chemistry
Child
Cinnamomum zeylanicum - chemistry
Coumarins - adverse effects - analysis
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Risk assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
Coumarin is a naturally occurring flavouring substance in cinnamon and many other plants. It is known that coumarin can cause liver toxicity in several species, and it is considered a non-genotoxic carcinogen in rodents. By using the bench mark dose approach we re-assessed coumarin toxicity and established a new TDI for coumarin of 0.07 mg/kg bw/day. Oral intake of coumarin is related to consumption of cinnamon-containing foods and food supplements. Cinnamon is a widely used spice in Norway, and can be used as topping on oatmeal porridge. Based on analyses of coumarin in Norwegian foods, intake calculations for children and adults were conducted, and a risk assessment of coumarin in the Norwegian population was performed. Intake estimates of coumarin show that small children eating oatmeal porridge several times a week sprinkled with cinnamon could have a coumarin intake of 1.63 mg/kg bw/day and may exceeding the TDI with several folds. Adults drinking cinnamon-based tea and consuming cinnamon supplements also can exceed TDI. The coumarin intake could exceed the TDI by 7- to 20-fold in some intake scenarios. Such large daily exceedances of TDI, even for a limited time period of 1-2 weeks, cause concern of adverse health effects.
PubMed ID
22178604 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.