Skip header and navigation

Refine By

843 records – page 1 of 85.

A 30-year analysis of cardiac neoplasms at autopsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173953
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):675-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Jagdish Butany
Shaun W Leong
Khenan Carmichael
Masashi Komeda
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Toronto General Hospital/University Health Network, Ontario. jagdish.butany@uhn.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):675-80
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Autopsy
Female
Heart Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Cardiac neoplasms are rare and the vast majority are metastatic in origin. Symptoms of cardiac neoplasms (primary or metastatic) usually appear late in the course of the disease and are often ignored because of the more severe effects of the primary malignant disorder or its therapy. Consequently, cardiac neoplasms, especially metastatic ones, are often not discovered until autopsy.
To assess the incidence of cardiac neoplasms at autopsy and to determine the sites of origins of metastatic cardiac neoplasms.
The pathology records from consecutive autopsies performed at the University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, from January 1973 to May 2004 were reviewed. They showed 266 cases of neoplasms involving the heart among 11,432 consecutive autopsies. These cases were then categorized based on their system of origin and further subclassified into specific primary site categories. As well, the type of cardiac tissue affected was noted in 193 cases (72.6%).
The 266 autopsy cases involving cardiac neoplasms represented 2.33% of the total number of autopsies. Among the 266 cases, two neoplasms were primaries, while 264 were metastatic in origin. Metastatic cardiac neoplasms most frequently metastasized from the respiratory system, followed (in order of decreasing frequency) by the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, breast and genitourinary systems. A minority of metastatic cardiac neoplasms were found to have spread from other systems. Cardiac neoplasms most frequently involved the pericardium, followed (in order of decreasing frequency) by the myocardium, epicardium and endocardium.
There were 132 times more metastatic cardiac neoplasms than primary cardiac neoplasms found in the present study. The most common sites of metastatic origin were the lungs, bone marrow (leukemia/multiple myeloma), breasts and lymph nodes (lymphoma). Leukemias were more prevalent in the present study than in previous studies. The pericardium was the tissue that was most frequently affected by metastatic cardiac neoplasms.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Jan;22(1):8016511961
PubMed ID
16003450 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 30-year survey of pulmonary embolism verified at autopsy: an analysis of 1274 surgical patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239210
Source
Br J Surg. 1985 Feb;72(2):105-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
D. Bergqvist
B. Lindblad
Source
Br J Surg. 1985 Feb;72(2):105-8
Date
Feb-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Autopsy
Humans
Length of Stay
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Postoperative Period
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Sweden
Abstract
A retrospective study was undertaken of all surgical patients in Malmö, Sweden, during the period 1951-1980, in whom pulmonary emboli were found at autopsy. The autopsy rate was high throughout the period, ranging from 73 to 100 per cent. Of 5477 patients who died during the period, 1274 had pulmonary emboli (23.6 per cent), 349 of which were considered fatal, 353 contributory to death and 572 incidental. Fifty-one per cent of the patients were not operated upon. The number of contributory and incidental emboli increased over the period, to some extent probably reflecting greater thoroughness in postmortems. The frequency of fatal pulmonary emboli decreased in the last 5 year period. Pulmonary embolism was more rare in patients under 50 years of age. The proportion of females increased. In 24 cases major embolism emanated from thrombi around central venous catheters. This retrospective analysis of a large number of patients shows that pulmonary embolism continues to be a major cause of death in surgical patients, and in Malmö as common a cause of death in operated as in nonoperated patients.
PubMed ID
3971113 View in PubMed
Less detail

[200 hospital autopsies after sudden, unexpected death].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111389
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1967 Feb 16;129(7):222-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-1967
Author
O F Thomsen
H. Hornbak
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1967 Feb 16;129(7):222-4
Date
Feb-16-1967
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Autopsy
Death, Sudden
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
PubMed ID
5599218 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A 1 year study at a coroner's station of cause of death in primary heart-aorta cases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255698
Source
Lakartidningen. 1972 Jan 12;69(3):264-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-1972

Abbreviated injury scale scoring in traffic fatalities: comparison of computerized tomography and autopsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146834
Source
J Trauma. 2010 Jun;68(6):1413-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Peter Mygind Leth
Marlene Ibsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. pleth@health.sdu.dk
Source
J Trauma. 2010 Jun;68(6):1413-6
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Autopsy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Forensic Medicine
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - radiography
Abstract
The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the value of postmortem computerized tomography (CT) for Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) scoring and Injury Severity Scoring (ISS) of traffic fatalities.
This is a prospective investigation of a consecutive series of 52 traffic fatalities from Southern Denmark that were CT scanned and autopsied. The AIS and ISS scores based on CT and autopsy (AU) were registered in a computer database and compared. Kappa values for reproducibility of AIS-severity scores and ISS scores were calculated.
On an average, there was a 94% agreement between AU and CT in detecting the presence or absence of lesions in the various anatomic regions, and the severity scores were the same in 90% of all cases (range, 75-100%). When different severity scoring was obtained, CT detected more lesions with a high severity score in the facial skeleton, pelvis, and extremities, whereas AU detected more lesions with high scores in the soft tissues (especially in the aorta), cranium, and ribs. The kappa value for reproducibility of AIS scores confirmed that the agreement between the two methods was good. The lowest kappa values (>0.6) were found for the facial skeleton, cerebellum, meninges, neck organs, lungs, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract. In these areas, the kappa value provided moderate agreement between CT and AU. For all other areas, there was a substantial agreement between the two methods. The ISS scores obtained by CT and by AU were calculated and were found to be with no or moderate variation in 85%. Rupture of the aorta was often overlooked by CT, resulting in too low ISS scoring.
The most precise postmortem AIS and ISS scorings of traffic fatalities was obtained by a combination of AU and CT. If it is not possible to perform an AU, then CT may be used as an acceptable alternative for AIS scoring. We have identified one important obstacle for postmortem ISS scoring, namely that aorta ruptures are not easily detected by post mortem CT.
PubMed ID
19996793 View in PubMed
Less detail

ABCB1 gene polymorphisms are associated with fatal intoxications involving venlafaxine but not citalopram.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115364
Source
Int J Legal Med. 2013 May;127(3):579-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
L. Karlsson
H. Green
A L Zackrisson
F. Bengtsson
I. Jakobsen Falk
B. Carlsson
J. Ahlner
F C Kugelberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Drug Research, Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int J Legal Med. 2013 May;127(3):579-86
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents, Second-Generation - poisoning
Autopsy
Case-Control Studies
Citalopram - poisoning
Cyclohexanols - poisoning
Drug Overdose - genetics
Female
Forensic Genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
P-Glycoprotein - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Sweden
Abstract
P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by the ABCB1/MDR1 gene, is a drug transporter at the blood-brain barrier. Several polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene are known to affect the activity and/or expression of P-gp, thereby influencing the treatment response and toxicity of P-gp substrates like citalopram and venlafaxine. In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of ABCB1 genotypes in forensic autopsy cases involving these two antidepressants. Further, the distribution of ABCB1 genotypes in deaths related to intoxication was compared to cases not associated to drug intoxication. The study included 228 forensic autopsy cases with different causes and manners of deaths. The ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) G1199A, C1236T, C3435T and G2677T/A for these individuals were determined. The SNPs C1236T and C3435T in venlafaxine-positive cases were significantly different between the intoxication cases and non-intoxications. This was not seen for cases involving citalopram, indicating that the effect of genetic variants might be substrate specific. This novel finding should, however, be confirmed in future studies with larger number of cases.
PubMed ID
23515680 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accuracy in reporting the causes of death. A comparison with diagnosis at autopsy in a series of mesotheliomas and other malignant tumors of the lung].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256107
Source
Can J Public Health. 1971 Sep-Oct;62(5):395-402
Publication Type
Article

Accuracy of clinical diagnosis in a Canadian teaching hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244220
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Sep 1;125(5):443-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1981
Author
W M Thurlbeck
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Sep 1;125(5):443-7
Date
Sep-1-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy
British Columbia
Chronic Disease
Diagnostic Errors
Humans
Lung - pathology
Lung Diseases - diagnosis - pathology
Pneumonia - pathology
Pulmonary Embolism - pathology
Abstract
Two hundred autopsies were investigated to determine the correlation between the clinical and pathological diagnoses in three categories--major underlying disease, cause of death and significant incidental pulmonary findings. There was concurrence in diagnosis of the major underlying disease in 76% of cases, with 12% of disagreements being considered minor and 12% major. In only three cases might different management have affected the outcome had the correct diagnosis of the major underlying disease been made during life. There was concurrence of the diagnosis of the cause of death (which was often different from the underlying disease) in 64% of cases, and in 10% of cases the outcome might have been different had the clinical diagnosis been accurate. The clinical opinion that lung disease was the cause of death was confirmed at autopsy in 54% of cases, and 45% of the pulmonary causes of death as determined at autopsy had been recognized clinically. Major incidental pulmonary findings diagnosed clinically were confirmed in 76% of cases, and major pulmonary findings diagnosed at autopsy had been recognized clinically in 83%. The major sources of these discrepancies were pulmonary embolism and pneumonia. If autopsies are to play a role in patient management, clinicians will have to be made aware of discrepancies between clinical and autopsy diagnosis. The real test of efficacy would be modification of patient management for the good.
Notes
Cites: Bull N Y Acad Med. 1968 Jul;44(7):808-295240157
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1974 Sep;196(3):203-104422553
Cites: Br Med J. 1975 May 10;2(5966):326-81131528
Cites: JAMA. 1975 Aug 4;233(5):441-31173855
Cites: JAMA. 1976 May 10;235(19):2080-1946528
Cites: Br Med J. 1977 Jun 18;1(6076):1577-80871672
Cites: Am J Clin Pathol. 1978 Feb;69(2 Suppl):242-4626168
Cites: Br Med J. 1980 Oct 11;281(6246):985-87427553
PubMed ID
7284926 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A combined lesion of the digestive organs and chronic inflammatory diseases of the large intestine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20919
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):74-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
S I Skliar
A I Denisiuk
N A Moskvichev
L I Prusskaia
S N Kirilko
A R Sapozhnikov
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):74-7
Date
Mar-1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Autopsy - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death
Chronic Disease
Colitis - mortality - pathology
Colonic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology
Comparative Study
Digestive System Diseases - mortality - pathology
English Abstract
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
An analysis was carried out of 222 medical records and autopsies from patients with inflammatory diseases of the large intestine, the immediate causes of death of whom were different disorders. The incidence of hepatitis running an active course correlated with age of patients and came up to 58.8% in the group of subjects 20 to 40 years old. In age group running between 40 to 60 and 60 to 80 years there prevailed colorectal carcinoma (18.3% and 42.5% respectively).
PubMed ID
10424048 View in PubMed
Less detail

843 records – page 1 of 85.