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[Optimization of epidemiological surveillance, by using current technologies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149950
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2009 Apr-Jun;(2):57-8
Publication Type
Article

[Production control with automatic data processing. 5. Gynecology]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28433
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Jan;68(3):243-5 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1971

[Production control with automatic data processing. 6. Development clinic in Karolinska Hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109076
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Jan;68(3):246-50 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1971

Work-practice changes associated with an electronic emergency department whiteboard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115609
Source
Health Informatics J. 2013 Mar;19(1):46-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Morten Hertzum
Jesper Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Roskilde University, Denmark. mhz@ruc.dk
Source
Health Informatics J. 2013 Mar;19(1):46-60
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing - utilization
Data Display
Denmark
Efficiency, Organizational
Emergency medical services
Female
Hospital Departments - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Organizational Innovation
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patients' Rooms
Task Performance and Analysis
Time Factors
Triage
Workload - psychology
Workplace - organization & administration
Abstract
Electronic whiteboards are introduced at emergency departments (EDs) to improve work practices. This study investigates whether the time physicians and nurses at an ED spend in patient rooms versus at the control desk increases after the introduction of an electronic whiteboard. After using this whiteboard for four months nurses, but not physicians, spend more of their time with the patients. With the electronic whiteboard, nurses spend 28% of their time in patient rooms and physicians 20%. Importantly, the changes facilitated by the electronic whiteboard are also dependent on implementation issues, existing work practices and the clinicians' experience. Another change in the work practices is distributed access to whiteboard information from the computers in patient rooms. A decrease in the mental workload of the coordinating nurse was envisaged but has not emerged. Achieving more changes appears to require an increase in whiteboard functionality and a firmer grip on the implementation process.
PubMed ID
23486825 View in PubMed
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