Skip header and navigation

Refine By

666 records – page 1 of 67.

131I dose-dependent thyroid autoimmune disorders in children living around Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34164
Source
Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1997 Sep;84(3):251-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
E V Vykhovanets
V P Chernyshov
I I Slukvin
Y G Antipkin
A N Vasyuk
H F Klimenko
K W Strauss
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Immunology, Institute of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kiev, Ukraine.
Source
Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1997 Sep;84(3):251-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmune Diseases - etiology
Child
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Lymphocyte Count
Lymphocyte Subsets - chemistry - immunology
Radioactive fallout
Radioactive Pollutants - adverse effects
Thyroglobulin - immunology
Thyroid Diseases - immunology
Thyroid Gland - ultrasonography
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Thyrotropin - blood
Ukraine
Abstract
We assessed the major lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood, thyroid ultrasonography, levels of serum autoantibodies to thyroglobulin (AbTg), thyroid hormones, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in 53 children without any chronic diseases living continuously around Chernobyl. The subjects ranged in age from 7 to 14 years and had different doses of 131I to their thyroid. Healthy children living on noncontaminated areas were assessed as controls. The majority of children with doses of 131I had normal levels of thyroid hormones. However, the percentages of positive sera for AbTg, TSH levels, ultrasonographic thyroid abnormalities, and abnormal echogenicity were significantly higher in children with doses of 131I than in controls. The dose of 131I to thyroid correlated positively with serum AbTg levels, percentage of CD3+CD4+ cells, and CD3+CD4+/CD3+CD8+ cell ratio and negatively with number of CD3+CD8+ and CD3-/CD16, CD56+ cells. Thus, our study demonstrates an association between dose of 131I and autoimmune thyroid disorders in this population of children.
PubMed ID
9281383 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absence of LKM-1 antibody reactivity in autoimmune and hepatitis-C-related chronic liver disease in Sweden. Swedish Internal Medicine Liver club.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34389
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1997 Feb;32(2):175-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
S. Lindgren
H B Braun
G. Michel
A. Nemeth
S. Nilsson
B. Thome-Kromer
S. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Medicine, University of Lund, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1997 Feb;32(2):175-8
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmunity - immunology
Child
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - immunology
Chronic Disease
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect
Hepatitis - immunology
Hepatitis C - immunology
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary - immunology
Liver Diseases - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Type-2 autoimmune hepatitis is a subgroup of chronic hepatitis characterized by the presence of liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies type 1 (LKM-1). A frequent association with chronic hepatitis C suggests that hepatitis virus might trigger autoimmune reactivity. LKM-1-positive chronic hepatitis is not uncommon in southern Europe but is rarely seen in the USA and the UK. The prevalence in Scandinavia is hitherto unknown. METHODS: We used an automated prototype LKM-1 immunometry-based assay (IMx) to detect LKM-1 antibodies in sera from 350 Swedish patients with chronic liver diseases (100 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 80 with primary sclerosing cholangitis, 100 with hepatitis C, and 70 patients with various forms of chronic hepatitis, including 36 autoimmune cases), and from 17 children with autoimmune hepatitis. Sera reactive in the IMx assay were subjected to immunofluorescence testing. RESULTS: No clearly LKM-reactive sera were detected. Serum samples from 29 patients were borderline reactive in the IMx assay but tested negative in the confirmatory immunofluorescence test. Positive tests in the former assay were likely caused by reactivity against microsomal antigens other than LKM-1/cytochrome P450IID6. CONCLUSIONS: LKM-1-positive type-2 autoimmune hepatitis is very rare in Sweden. Furthermore, chronic hepatitis C did not trigger this type of autoimmune reactivity in our patients, probably owing to genetic insusceptibility.
PubMed ID
9051879 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accelerated aging of immune system of the veterans of special risk subdivisions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160568
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2007;20(1):96-111
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
N V Alishev
A A Vashkevich
B A Drabkin
T M Koroleva
L S Kositskaia
V M Shubik
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2007;20(1):96-111
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging, Premature - etiology
Antibodies - blood
Autoimmunity
Female
Humans
Immune System - radiation effects
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - immunology
Nuclear Weapons
Russia
Stress, Psychological - complications
Veterans
Abstract
Long far after nuclear weapons tests the veterans of special risk subdivisions (SRS) had changes of humoral factors of nonspecific protection, concentration of immunoglobulins in blood serum, lymphocytes sensibleness to respiratory viruses, humoral and cellular autoimmune displacements, raise of turmonecrotic factor content. Some of the revealed changes (complement, lysocim, concentration of immunoglobulins) are bound up with elderly age of examined people and their diseases. The other changes (autoimmune displacements, sensibleness to respiratory viruses) can be bound up with nuclear weapons tests. Some immunology changes occur because of radiation and non-radiation factors, a nervous shock being among them. Estimate of autoimmune changes is important for the health characteristic 20-40 years after nuclear tests and possible radiation influence. The role of such changes is significant in a sick rate of the veterans of special risk subdivisions.
PubMed ID
17969593 View in PubMed
Less detail

The accuracy of administrative data diagnoses of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134892
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Aug;38(8):1612-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Sasha Bernatsky
Tina Linehan
John G Hanly
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), Montreal, Quebec, Canada. sasha.bernatsky@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Aug;38(8):1612-6
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoimmune Diseases - diagnosis - immunology
Databases, Factual - standards
Hospital Administration - standards
Humans
Nova Scotia
Organization and Administration - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Rheumatic Diseases - diagnosis - immunology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To examine the validity of case definitions for systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases [SARD; systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), myositis, Sjögren's syndrome, vasculitis, and polymyalgia rheumatica] based on administrative data, compared to rheumatology records.
A list of rheumatic disease diagnoses was generated from population-based administrative billing and hospitalization databases. Subjects who had been seen by an arthritis center rheumatologist were identified, and the medical records reviewed.
We found that 844 Nova Scotia residents had a diagnosis of one of the rheumatic diseases of interest, based on administrative data, and had had = 1 rheumatology assessment at a provincial arthritis center. Charts were available on 824 subjects, some of whom had been identified in the administrative database with > 1 diagnosis. Thus a total of 1136 diagnoses were available for verification against clinical records. Of the 824 subjects, 680 (83%) had their administrative database diagnoses confirmed on chart review. The majority of subjects who were "false-positive" for a given rheumatic disease on administrative data had a true diagnosis of a similar rheumatic disease. Most sensitivity estimates for specific administrative data-based case definitions were > 90%, although for SSc, the sensitivity was 80.5%. The specificity estimates were also > 90%, except for SLE, where the specificity was 72.5%.
Although health administrative data may be a valid resource, there are potential problems regarding the specificity and sensitivity of case definitions, which should be kept in mind for future studies.
PubMed ID
21532057 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of fine needle aspiration in the pre-operative diagnosis of thyroid neoplasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217279
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1994 Oct;23(5):360-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
S M Vojvodich
R H Ballagh
H. Cramer
H B Lampe
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Western Ontario, London.
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1994 Oct;23(5):360-5
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - pathology - surgery
Biopsy, Needle - statistics & numerical data
Carcinoma, Papillary - pathology - surgery
Cysts - pathology - surgery
Forecasting
Frozen Sections - statistics & numerical data
Goiter - pathology - surgery
Humans
Intraoperative Care
Ontario - epidemiology
Preoperative Care
Sensitivity and specificity
Thyroid Diseases - pathology - surgery
Thyroid Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Thyroid Nodule - pathology - surgery
Thyroiditis, Autoimmune - pathology - surgery
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy and clinical utility of fine needle aspiration (FNA) for the preoperative diagnosis of patients presenting with solitary thyroid nodules. Between 1987 and 1991, 317 patients with a thyroid nodule underwent FNA. Surgery was performed on 98 of the patients, and the cytologic findings were correlated with the final histologic diagnoses for these cases. Of the 98 patients operated on, satisfactory aspirates were obtained in 85 patients and classified as either malignant, suspicious for malignancy, or benign. The FNA was correct in predicting malignancy in 29 of 35 nodules (82.9%). With the benign nodules, FNA was correct in 44 of 50 nodules (88%). The overall accuracy of FNA was 85.9%. The accuracy for the combination of FNA and frozen section (FS) was 92.6%. We conclude that both FNA and FS are accurate tests that play a useful role in the pre- and intraoperative diagnostic evaluation of patients presenting with solitary thyroid nodules.
PubMed ID
7807641 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activation of the immune system and systemic immune-complex deposits in Brown Norway rats with dental amalgam restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72544
Source
J Dent Res. 1998 Jun;77(6):1415-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
P. Hultman
U. Lindh
P. Hörsted-Bindslev
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environment, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
J Dent Res. 1998 Jun;77(6):1415-25
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Antibody Formation - drug effects
Antigen-Antibody Complex - analysis - blood
Autoimmune Diseases - chemically induced
Autoimmunity
Body Burden
Comparative Study
Copper - analysis
Dental Amalgam - toxicity
Dinitrobenzenes
Female
Immune Complex Diseases - chemically induced
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Laminin
Lymphocyte Activation - drug effects
Mercury - analysis - blood - pharmacokinetics
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Silver - analysis
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Statistics, nonparametric
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
Dental amalgam restorations are a significant source of mercury exposure in the human population, but their potential to cause systemic health effects is highly disputed. We examined effects on the immune system by giving genetically mercury-susceptible Brown Norway (BN) rats and mercury-resistant Lewis (LE) rats silver amalgam restorations in 4 molars of the upper jaw, causing a body burden similar to that described in human amalgam-bearers (from 250 to 375 mg amalgam/kg body weight). BN rats with amalgam restorations, compared with control rats given composite resinous restorations, developed a rapid activation of the immune system, with a maximum 12-fold increase of the plasma IgE concentration after 3 wks (p 0.05). After 12 wks, BN rats with amalgam restorations showed significantly increased (p spleen > cerebrum occipital lobe > cerebellum > liver > thymus, and the tissue silver concentration was significantly (p
PubMed ID
9649170 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute glomerulonephritis, Henoch-Schönlein purpura and dental amalgam in Swedish children: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34562
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1996 Nov 22;191(3):277-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-1996
Author
P. Herrström
B. Högstedt
S. Aronson
A. Holmén
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Primary Care Center Hertig Knut, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1996 Nov 22;191(3):277-82
Date
Nov-22-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Autoimmune Diseases - chemically induced
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Glomerulonephritis - chemically induced - etiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Mercury Compounds - adverse effects
Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch - chemically induced - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The issue of adverse health effects from dental amalgam and the concurrent low-dose exposure to inorganic mercury have been scrutinized by several Swedish expert groups during the past years. Only rarely have amalgam fillings in children been related to health effects. Experimental studies in genetically disposed animals have shown that low doses of inorganic mercury can induce autoimmune glomerulonephritis. The present case-control study included 31 children with acute glomerulonephritis and 33 with Henoch-Schönlein purpura retrieved from an in-patient register for the period 1973-1992 at the county hospital in Halmstad, Sweden. The median age was 10 and 9 years, respectively, for the two diagnostic groups. Dental clinics reported amalgam burden of the patients during the year before the date of diagnosis. Corresponding data were obtained for three randomly selected controls for each case, drawn from the case records of the same dental clinics, with matching for age and sex. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 1.42 (0.49, 4.11) for Henoch-Schönlein purpura, 0.59 (0.25, 1.38) for acute glomerulonephritis and 0.84 (0.40, 1.75) for both diseases combined. The results of this study did not indicate increased disease risk in relation to amalgam burden.
PubMed ID
8931347 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adoptive transfer of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis in HgCl2 injected rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57752
Source
Curr Eye Res. 1992;11 Suppl:101-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
A. Saoudi
B. Bellon
Y. de Kozak
P. Druet
Author Affiliation
Pathologie rénale et vasculaire, INSERM U28, Hôpital Broussais, Paris, France.
Source
Curr Eye Res. 1992;11 Suppl:101-5
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens - immunology
Arrestin
Autoantigens - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - immunology - therapy
Disease Models, Animal
Eye Proteins - immunology
Female
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Male
Mercuric Chloride
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retinitis - immunology - therapy
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Uveitis - immunology - therapy
Abstract
We previously demonstrated that mercuric chloride (HgCl2) injected-(Lewis x Brown-Norway) F1 rats are protected against experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) induced by active immunization with the retinal S-antigen (S-Ag). To better understand the mechanisms of the protection promoted by HgCl2, we studied the effect of HgCl2-induced autoimmune disease on transferred EAU. We demonstrate herein that HgCl2 has no effect on adoptively transferred EAU. Therefore, the HgCl2-induced autoimmune disease does not affect effector S-Ag specific T cells activated in vitro but acts at an earlier stage.
PubMed ID
1424735 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse events and problems in therapeutic hemapheresis. A report from the Swedish registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19348
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2001 Aug;25(1):33-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
R. Norda
O. Berséus
B. Stegmayr
Author Affiliation
Department of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohemotherapy, Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden. rut.norda@orebroll.se
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2001 Aug;25(1):33-41
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoimmune Diseases - complications - therapy
Disease Susceptibility
Extracorporeal Circulation - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Flushing - epidemiology - etiology
Hematologic Diseases - complications - therapy
Humans
Hypotension - epidemiology - etiology
Immunosorbent Techniques
Incidence
Nausea - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - complications - therapy
Paresthesia - epidemiology - etiology
Plasma Exchange - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Plasmapheresis - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Urticaria - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Since 1996 adverse events (AE) in therapeutic apheresis (TA) have been more extensively registered in Sweden. This report analyzes the extent and relation of AEs to procedures and diagnoses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Reporting of TA performed in Sweden was centralized. A separate system for the registration of AE in TA was established and the data received were entered into a central database for registration and analyses. Fifteen of all 35 apheresis units reported both TA and AE during 1996-1999. These centers performed 75% of all TA procedures. Adverse events included medical symptoms, vascular access problems, technical and other problems. RESULTS: More than 14,000 procedures were registered during the observation period. No fatalities occurred. AEs occurred in 3.7% (1996), 4.6% (1997), 4.2% (1998) and 4.4% (1999) of procedures. Interventions during the adverse event were performed in about 65% of the events. Apheresis procedures were interrupted due to an adverse event in about 1%. Adverse events occurred in 5.6% of plasma exchanges, 1.9% of plasma modulations and 6.8% of cytapheresis procedures. Paresthesia was registered in 22% and hypotensive events in 20.5%. Other more frequent symptoms were urticaria (14.4%), shivering (7.4%) and nausea (7.4%). AEs were most frequent in patients with Goodpasture's syndrome (12.5%), TTP/HUS (10.5%) and GuillainBarré syndrome (11.0%). CONCLUSION: AEs are few, often mild and less common in plasma modulation than plasma exchange. AEs are more frequent during TA of patients with certain diagnoses such as TTP/HUS.
PubMed ID
11791760 View in PubMed
Less detail

666 records – page 1 of 67.