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322 records – page 1 of 33.

131I dose-dependent thyroid autoimmune disorders in children living around Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34164
Source
Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1997 Sep;84(3):251-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
E V Vykhovanets
V P Chernyshov
I I Slukvin
Y G Antipkin
A N Vasyuk
H F Klimenko
K W Strauss
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Immunology, Institute of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kiev, Ukraine.
Source
Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1997 Sep;84(3):251-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmune Diseases - etiology
Child
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Lymphocyte Count
Lymphocyte Subsets - chemistry - immunology
Radioactive fallout
Radioactive Pollutants - adverse effects
Thyroglobulin - immunology
Thyroid Diseases - immunology
Thyroid Gland - ultrasonography
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Thyrotropin - blood
Ukraine
Abstract
We assessed the major lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood, thyroid ultrasonography, levels of serum autoantibodies to thyroglobulin (AbTg), thyroid hormones, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in 53 children without any chronic diseases living continuously around Chernobyl. The subjects ranged in age from 7 to 14 years and had different doses of 131I to their thyroid. Healthy children living on noncontaminated areas were assessed as controls. The majority of children with doses of 131I had normal levels of thyroid hormones. However, the percentages of positive sera for AbTg, TSH levels, ultrasonographic thyroid abnormalities, and abnormal echogenicity were significantly higher in children with doses of 131I than in controls. The dose of 131I to thyroid correlated positively with serum AbTg levels, percentage of CD3+CD4+ cells, and CD3+CD4+/CD3+CD8+ cell ratio and negatively with number of CD3+CD8+ and CD3-/CD16, CD56+ cells. Thus, our study demonstrates an association between dose of 131I and autoimmune thyroid disorders in this population of children.
PubMed ID
9281383 View in PubMed
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Absence of LKM-1 antibody reactivity in autoimmune and hepatitis-C-related chronic liver disease in Sweden. Swedish Internal Medicine Liver club.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34389
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1997 Feb;32(2):175-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
S. Lindgren
H B Braun
G. Michel
A. Nemeth
S. Nilsson
B. Thome-Kromer
S. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Medicine, University of Lund, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1997 Feb;32(2):175-8
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmunity - immunology
Child
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - immunology
Chronic Disease
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect
Hepatitis - immunology
Hepatitis C - immunology
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary - immunology
Liver Diseases - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Type-2 autoimmune hepatitis is a subgroup of chronic hepatitis characterized by the presence of liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies type 1 (LKM-1). A frequent association with chronic hepatitis C suggests that hepatitis virus might trigger autoimmune reactivity. LKM-1-positive chronic hepatitis is not uncommon in southern Europe but is rarely seen in the USA and the UK. The prevalence in Scandinavia is hitherto unknown. METHODS: We used an automated prototype LKM-1 immunometry-based assay (IMx) to detect LKM-1 antibodies in sera from 350 Swedish patients with chronic liver diseases (100 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 80 with primary sclerosing cholangitis, 100 with hepatitis C, and 70 patients with various forms of chronic hepatitis, including 36 autoimmune cases), and from 17 children with autoimmune hepatitis. Sera reactive in the IMx assay were subjected to immunofluorescence testing. RESULTS: No clearly LKM-reactive sera were detected. Serum samples from 29 patients were borderline reactive in the IMx assay but tested negative in the confirmatory immunofluorescence test. Positive tests in the former assay were likely caused by reactivity against microsomal antigens other than LKM-1/cytochrome P450IID6. CONCLUSIONS: LKM-1-positive type-2 autoimmune hepatitis is very rare in Sweden. Furthermore, chronic hepatitis C did not trigger this type of autoimmune reactivity in our patients, probably owing to genetic insusceptibility.
PubMed ID
9051879 View in PubMed
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Acetylcholine receptor antibodies in myasthenia gravis are associated with greater risk of diabetes and thyroid disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168193
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2006 Aug;114(2):124-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
C. Toth
D. McDonald
J. Oger
K. Brownell
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary and the Calgary Health Region, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. corytoth@shaw.ca
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2006 Aug;114(2):124-32
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Autoantibodies - blood
Causality
Child
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myasthenia Gravis - blood - epidemiology - immunology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Cholinergic - immunology
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Sex Distribution
Thymoma - immunology - physiopathology
Thymus Neoplasms - immunology - physiopathology
Thyroid Diseases - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Abstract
Myasthenia gravis (MG) may be associated with the presence of acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChRAb) [seropositive MG (SPMG)] or their absence [seronegative MG (SNMG)]. Along with features of MG, the presence of the AChRAb may relate to the existence of other immune-mediated diseases. We sought to determine the association of SPMG with other potential autoimmune diseases.
A retrospective evaluation of prospectively identified MG patients at a tertiary care center was performed, with patients separated into SPMG and SNMG. Prevalence of other immune-mediated disorders, as well as the epidemiology, sensitivity of diagnostic testing, and thymic pathology, was contrasted between both patient groups.
Of the 109 MG patients identified, 66% were SPMG. SPMG was associated with a greater likelihood of significant repetitive stimulation decrement, the presence of either thymoma or thymic hyperplasia, and the presence of thyroid disease. In addition, all patients with a diagnosis of diabetes, concurrent with MG, were found to be SPMG.
AChRAb and SPMG impart not only a distinctive clinical and electrophysiological phenotype of MG, but are also associated with the heightened presence of endocrinological disease.
PubMed ID
16867036 View in PubMed
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[A comparative evaluation of the diagnostic value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and rheumatoid factor in rheumatoid arthritis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93534
Source
Korean J Lab Med. 2008 Feb;28(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Cho Sun Young
Kang So Young
Lee Hee Joo
Lee Woo In
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, East-West Neo-Medical Center, School of Medicine, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul, Korea.
Source
Korean J Lab Med. 2008 Feb;28(1):39-45
Date
Feb-2008
Language
Korean
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis
Autoantibodies - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
ROC Curve
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Rheumatoid Factor - blood
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Despite its unsatisfactory specificity, rheumatoid factor (RF) is the only serologic marker included in the diagnostic criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) for rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the diagnostic value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies has been emphasized in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) due to its high specificity. To evaluate the second generation of anti-CCP antibodies as a diagnostic marker, we evaluated anti-CCP test in 163 individuals. METHODS: The study population was divided into the following four groups: RA group (n=18), other disease group with arthritic symptoms (n=44), other disease group without arthritic symptoms (n=45), and healthy group (n=56). Anti-CCP was measured by an ELISA analyzer (Coda, Bio-Rad, USA) with Immunoscan RA (Euro-Diagnostica, Malmo, Sweden) and RF was measured by an automated chemistry analyzer (Toshiba, Japan) with RF-LATEX X1 (Denka Seiken, Japan). RESULTS: The sensitivity of anti-CCP and RF was 72.2% and 100%, respectively, and the respective figures for the specificity were 96.6% and 73%. On each ROC curve, the area under the curve was 0.867 for anti-CCP and 0.959 for RF. In other disease groups, most of the false positive cases of RF were found in the patients with hyperlipidemia or HBV carriage. However, anti-CCP was not detected in any of the patients with these two conditions. False positive rates of RF in the three control groups were 34.1% in other disease group with arthritic symptoms, 48.9% in the other disease group without arthritic symptoms, and 3.6% in healthy group. The respective figures for anti-CCP were 6.8%, 2.2%, and 1.8%. CONCLUSIONS: The specificity of anti-CCP antibodies was higher than that of RF for discriminating RA from other diseases, especially in the patients with hyperlipidemia or HBV carriage. With its high specificity, anti-CCP antibodies can play an additive role in establishing the diagnosis of RA in patients with RF positivity.
PubMed ID
18309254 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the immunological (antimicrosomal antibodies) and cytogenetic indices of children living in radioactively contaminated areas of Bryansk Province]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34277
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 1997 May-Jun;37(3):404-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
A P Shinkarkina
A A Zhloba
V K Podgorodnichewnko
A V Sevan'kaev
A M Poverennyi
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 1997 May-Jun;37(3):404-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Autoantibodies - blood
Cells, Cultured
Child
Chromosome Aberrations
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Humans
Lymphocytes - radiation effects
Microsomes - immunology
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Russia
Thyroid Gland - immunology - radiation effects
Ukraine
Abstract
The chromosome dicentric aberrations in the lymphocytes and levels of antibodies to human thyroid microsomal antigen in the serum of the children lived in the area of Bryansk Province suffered from the Chernobyl accident was examined. Correlation between those tests was not estimated: the autoantibodies were revealed in group with dicentrics and without those in 4.0% and 4.5% of cases correspondingly. Antimicrosomal antibodies were revealed more frequently (5.0%) and in higher titers in the children from the more polluted Bryansk Province than in those from Kaluga Province (3.1%). These data can testify about the role of inside radiation of thyroid gland in appearance of autoimmune thyroiditis signs.
PubMed ID
9244530 View in PubMed
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A/H1N1 antibodies and TRIB2 autoantibodies in narcolepsy patients diagnosed in conjunction with the Pandemrix vaccination campaign in Sweden 2009-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259020
Source
J Autoimmun. 2014 May;50:99-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Alexander Lind
Anita Ramelius
Tomas Olsson
Lisen Arnheim-Dahlström
Favelle Lamb
Mohsen Khademi
Aditya Ambati
Markus Maeurer
Anna-Lena Nilsson
Izaura Lima Bomfim
Katharina Fink
Åke Lernmark
Source
J Autoimmun. 2014 May;50:99-106
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Autoantibodies - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Gene Expression
Glutamate Decarboxylase - antagonists & inhibitors - genetics - immunology
HLA-DQ beta-Chains - genetics - immunology
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - immunology - prevention & control
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - antagonists & inhibitors - genetics - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Narcolepsy - chemically induced - diagnosis - genetics - immunology
Pandemics - prevention & control
Sweden
Vaccination - adverse effects
Abstract
Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder related to hypocretin deficiency resulting from a specific loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area. The disease is thought to be autoimmune due to a strong association with HLA-DQB1*06:02. In 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the H1N1 2009 flu pandemic (A/H1N1PDM09). In response to this, the Swedish vaccination campaign began in October of the same year, using the influenza vaccine Pandemrix(?). A few months later an excess of narcolepsy cases was observed. It is still unclear to what extent the vaccination campaign affected humoral autoimmunity associated with narcolepsy. We studied 47 patients with narcolepsy (6-69 years of age) and 80 healthy controls (3-61 years of age) selected after the Pandemrix vaccination campaign. The first aim was to determine antibodies against A/H1N1 and autoantibodies to Tribbles homolog 2 (TRIB2), a narcolepsy autoantigen candidate as well as to GAD65 and IA-2 as disease specificity controls. The second aim was to test if levels and frequencies of these antibodies and autoantibodies were associated with HLA-DQB1*06:02. In?vitro transcribed and translated [(35)S]-methionine and -cysteine-labeled influenza A virus (A/California/04/2009/(H1N1)) segment 4 hemagglutinin was used to detect antibodies in a radiobinding assay. Autoantibodies to TRIB2, GAD65 and IA-2 were similarly detected in standard radiobinding assays. The narcolepsy patients had higher median levels of A/H1N1 antibodies than the controls (p?=?0.006). A/H1N1 antibody levels were higher among the
PubMed ID
24485154 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption is associated with decreased risk of rheumatoid arthritis: results from two Scandinavian case-control studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93056
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2009 Feb;68(2):222-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Källberg H.
Jacobsen S.
Bengtsson C.
Pedersen M.
Padyukov L.
Garred P.
Frisch M.
Karlson E W
Klareskog L.
Alfredsson L.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Box 210, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden. henrik.kallberg@ki.se
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2009 Feb;68(2):222-7
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - genetics - immunology - prevention & control
Autoantibodies - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and alcohol consumption in combination with smoking and HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE). METHODS: Data from two independent case-control studies of RA, the Swedish EIRA (1204 cases and 871 controls) and the Danish CACORA (444 cases and 533 controls), were used to estimate ORs of developing RA for different amounts of alcohol consumed. RESULTS: Alcohol consumption was significantly more common in controls (p
PubMed ID
18535114 View in PubMed
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Analysis of 508 infertile male patients in south-western Finland in 1980-2000: hormonal status and factors predisposing to immunological infertility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183006
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2003 Dec 10;111(2):173-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2003
Author
Esko Veräjänkorva
Matti Laato
Pasi Pöllänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy, Institute of Biomedicine and The Turku Graduate School of Clinical Sciences, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland. esolve@utu.fi
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2003 Dec 10;111(2):173-8
Date
Dec-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - complications
Autoantibodies - blood
Finland
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Hormones - blood
Humans
Hypogonadism - etiology
Infertility, Male - blood - immunology
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Mumps - complications
Risk factors
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - analysis
Smoking - adverse effects
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility
Spermatozoa - abnormalities - immunology
Testosterone - blood
Varicocele - complications - therapy
Abstract
To analyse the factors predisposing to male immunological infertility from the hospital records of 508 patients that had been treated for infertility in the Turku University Central Hospital from 1980 to 2000. In addition, the hormonal status was investigated at the beginning of treatment.
Patients with a history of mumps, or either a fresh varicocele or a history of varicocele had statistically significant lower levels of MAR antisperm antibodies (ASAs) than patients with no such conditions. Repair of varicocele (either surgical or embolisation), showed a statistically significant enhancement of the total sperm cell counts in ejaculates, but it appeared not to have any influence on other parameters of the semen analysis (mobility and morphology). Of all male infertility patients, 66.3% had normal hormonal status at the beginning of treatment, 12.6% of patients had hypotestosteronemia and 22.1% had subclinical hypogonadism. Patients with subclinical hypogonadism had lower total sperm cell count in ejaculates than patients with normal hormonal status although they had statistically significant more offspring. In addition, it appeared that mumps orchitis as well as smoking and alcohol abuse are risk factors for subclinical hypogonadism.
No clear predisposing factor for male immunological infertility could be found. However, patients with subclinical hypogonadism differed from other male infertility patients and thus may form a special group among the male infertility patients.
PubMed ID
14597247 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of autoimmune antibody testing patterns in a Canadian health region and an evaluation of a laboratory algorithm aimed at reducing unnecessary testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117498
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2013 May;32(5):601-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Ada Man
Kam Shojania
Carmen Phoon
Jason Pal
Monika Hudoba de Badyn
David Pi
Diane Lacaille
Author Affiliation
Section of Rheumatology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. adaman@bu.edu
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2013 May;32(5):601-8
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Antibodies, Antinuclear - blood
Antigens, Nuclear - blood
Autoantibodies - blood
British Columbia
Cost-Benefit Analysis
DNA - immunology
Health Care Costs
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Physician's Practice Patterns
Regional Medical Programs - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Rheumatology - economics - standards
Abstract
Autoantibody tests are often ordered inappropriately. We aimed to evaluate the ordering patterns of these tests in our local health region and to develop a laboratory algorithm aimed at reducing unnecessary tests. Laboratory data including the number and sequence of tests, ordering physician specialties and results for antinuclear (ANA), extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) and anti-double stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibody tests from 2007 to 2009 were evaluated. Based on this information and a clinical consensus meeting, an algorithm was developed and applied retrospectively to 1 year of inpatient laboratory data to simulate potential cost savings. We identified a large volume of these autoantibody tests performed, equating to testing costs of $862,706.72, where less than 17 % of each were positive. Repeated ANA tests were mostly ordered after a previously negative result, and 1 % of patients with negative results changed to =1:160 on repeat testing. Close to half of all ENA and anti-dsDNA tests that were ordered were done so simultaneously with ANA, suggesting their use as screening tests. This was done more frequently in the inpatient setting. An algorithm was developed where ENA and anti-dsDNA tests would be cancelled if ANA was negative in the same sample. ANA repeated within 1 year would be cancelled and the prior result provided. Application of the algorithm retrospectively simulated a 30 % cost savings. Repeat testing and simultaneous ordering of multiple tests contributed to the excessive ordering of autoantibody tests in our health region. Our proposed algorithm would reduce testing costs and should be accompanied by appropriate educational information for physicians.
PubMed ID
23292519 View in PubMed
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An increased concentration of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand pre-dates the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287470
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2017 Dec 01;56(12):2190-2196
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2017
Author
Linda Johansson
Lisbeth Ärlestig
Heidi Kokkonen
Mikael Brink
Solbritt Rantapää-Dahlqvist
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2017 Dec 01;56(12):2190-2196
Date
Dec-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibodies - blood
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - diagnosis
Autoantibodies - blood
Biological Specimen Banks
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Interleukin-10 - blood
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
Prodromal Symptoms
RANK Ligand - blood
Rheumatoid Factor - blood
Sweden
Abstract
RANK ligand (RANKL) is involved in destruction and osteoporosis in RA. In this study, the relationships between RANKL and ACPA, anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP), cytokines and chemokines were analysed in individuals before the onset of RA symptoms, and their associations with radiological findings at disease onset were assessed.
This was a case-control study performed within the Medical Biobank of Northern Sweden that included 470 pre-symptomatic individuals [334 women and 136 men; mean (s.d.) age 52.3 (9.4) years] using blood samples donated before symptom onset (pre-dating time; 5.0 years) and 96 controls (60 women and 36 men). Plasma was analysed for RANKL (BioVendor, Karasek, Brno, Czech Republic), anti-CCP2 antibodies (Eurodiagnostics, Malmö, Sweden), anti-CarP antibodies (in-house ELISA), ACPA specificities (ISAC-platform, Phadia AB, Uppsala, Sweden) and cytokines/chemokines (Meso Scale Discovery methods, Rockville, MD, USA). Radiographs of hands and feet were graded using the Larsen score.
The concentration of RANKL was higher in the pre-symptomatic individuals compared with controls; mean (s.e.m.): 0.50 (0.03) vs 0.22 (0.02) nmol/l (P
PubMed ID
29029341 View in PubMed
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322 records – page 1 of 33.