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Acceptance of background noise, working memory capacity, and auditory evoked potentials in subjects with normal hearing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120548
Source
J Am Acad Audiol. 2012 Jul-Aug;23(7):542-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
K Jonas Brännström
Edita Zunic
Aida Borovac
Tina Ibertsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics, and Audiology, Lund University, Sweden. jonas.brannstrom@med.lu.se
Source
J Am Acad Audiol. 2012 Jul-Aug;23(7):542-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory - physiology
Female
Hearing - physiology
Humans
Male
Memory, Short-Term - physiology
Noise
Reaction Time - physiology
Reference Values
Speech Perception - physiology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is a method for quantifying the amount of background noise that subjects accept when listening to speech. Large variations in ANL have been seen between normal-hearing subjects and between studies of normal-hearing subjects, but few explanatory variables have been identified.
To explore a possible relationship between a Swedish version of the ANL test, working memory capacity (WMC), and auditory evoked potentials (AEPs).
ANL, WMC, and AEP were tested in a counterbalanced order across subjects.
Twenty-one normal-hearing subjects participated in the study (14 females and 7 males; aged 20-39 yr with an average of 25.7 yr).
Reported data consists of age, pure-tone average (PTA), most comfortable level (MCL), background noise level (BNL), ANL (i.e., MCL - BNL), AEP latencies, AEP amplitudes, and WMC. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was calculated between the collected variables to investigate associations. A principal component analysis (PCA) with Varimax rotation was conducted on the collected variables to explore underlying factors and estimate interactions between the tested variables. Subjects were also pooled into two groups depending on their results on the WMC test, one group with a score lower than the average and one with a score higher than the average. Comparisons between these two groups were made using the Mann-Whitney U-test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons.
A negative association was found between ANL and WMC but not between AEP and ANL or WMC. Furthermore, ANL is derived from MCL and BNL, and a significant positive association was found between BNL and WMC. However, no significant associations were seen between AEP latencies and amplitudes and the demographic variables, MCL, and BNL. The PCA identified two underlying factors: One that contained MCL, BNL, ANL, and WMC and another that contained latency for wave Na and amplitudes for waves V and Na-Pa. Using the variables in the first factor, the findings were further explored by pooling the subjects into two groups according to their WMC (WMClow and WMChigh). It was found that the WMClow had significantly poorer BNL than the WMChigh.
The findings suggest that there is a strong relationship between BNL and WMC, while the association between MCL, ANL, and WMC seems less clear-cut.
PubMed ID
22992261 View in PubMed
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Acoustic-reflex responses in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48476
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Virtaniemi
M. Laakso
J. Nuutinen
S. Karjalainen
E. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests
Adult
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases - physiopathology
Blood Glucose - analysis
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Diabetic Angiopathies - physiopathology
Diabetic Neuropathies - physiopathology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Reaction Time - physiology
Reflex, Acoustic - physiology
Reflex, Stretch - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are especially susceptible to microangiopathic complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Microangiopathic changes are also the most important findings in histopathologic studies of the inner ear and central nervous systems in diabetic subjects. No previous studies have measured acoustic-reflex latencies (ARL) or amplitudes (ARA) in patients with IDDM. ARL and ARA reflect the function of the acoustic-reflex arch. Furthermore, possible changes in the tympanic membrane, ossicular chain, and stapedius muscle may affect the shape of acoustic-reflex. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Acoustic-reflex thresholds, latencies, and amplitudes were studied in 53 patients with IDDM and 42 randomly selected nondiabetic control subjects, aged between 20 and 40 years, using the Madsen Model ZO 73 Impedance Bridge (Madsen Electronics, Copenhagen, Denmark). Subjects with an abnormal tympanic membrane, conductive hearing loss, and known cause for hearing impairment eg, noise damage, were excluded from the study. RESULTS: There were no differences between control and diabetic subjects in the contralateral acoustic-reflex thresholds. In contrast, patients with IDDM had longer ARLs and decreased ARAs compared with those of control subjects. ARA amplitude had linear correlation with the amplitude of tympanogram, whereas ARL had no linear correlation with auditory brainstem latencies in the same study subjects. Acoustic-reflex responses in insulin-dependent diabetic patients were not associated with the duration of diabetes, metabolic control, microangiopathy, or neuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged ARLs and decreased ARAs in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes are probably caused more by the stiff middle ear system than disturbances in the brainstem.
PubMed ID
8179101 View in PubMed
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Age-related hearing difficulties. I. Hearing impairment, disability, and handicap--a controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8663
Source
Audiology. 1988;27(3):164-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
G. Salomon
V. Vesterager
M. Jagd
Author Affiliation
Audiology Department, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark.
Source
Audiology. 1988;27(3):164-78
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Audiometry
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Comparative Study
Consumer Satisfaction
Denmark
Female
Hearing Aids
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - diagnosis
Humans
Male
Presbycusis - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The study compares the audiological profile of a group of first-time applicants for hearing aids, a group of re-applicants and a group of non-complainers, aged 70-75 years (n = 71). In spite of overlap in range, a significant difference in thresholds and discrimination was found. The lip-reading capacity was well preserved in the elderly, but showed a significant correlation to the general health condition. The audiological benefit of hearing-aids did not increase with early fitting. General satisfaction with life was independent of satisfaction with hearing; two thirds of the patients were satisfied with their aids and used them regularly. The rest were dissatisfied and used them less than once a week. The aids were most systematically used to watch TV. Pure-tone average and handicap scaling were compared as guidelines for hearing-aid fitting. The most powerful tool to identify those in need of hearing-aids was handicap scaling based on interviews concerning self-assessed hearing difficulties.
PubMed ID
3408401 View in PubMed
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Assessing auditory evoked potentials of wild harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294363
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 07; 140(1):442
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2016
Author
Andreas Ruser
Michael Dähne
Abbo van Neer
Klaus Lucke
Janne Sundermeyer
Ursula Siebert
Dorian S Houser
James J Finneran
Eligius Everaarts
Jolanda Meerbeek
Rune Dietz
Signe Sveegaard
Jonas Teilmann
Author Affiliation
Institute for Terrestrial and Aquatic Wildlife Research, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Büsum, SH, Germany.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 07; 140(1):442
Date
07-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Animals
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Denmark
Evoked Potentials, Auditory - physiology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Noise - adverse effects
Phocoena - physiology
Abstract
Testing the hearing abilities of marine mammals under water is a challenging task. Sample sizes are usually low, thus limiting the ability to generalize findings of susceptibility towards noise influences. A method to measure harbor porpoise hearing thresholds in situ in outdoor conditions using auditory steady state responses of the brainstem was developed and tested. The method was used on 15 live-stranded animals from the North Sea during rehabilitation, shortly before release into the wild, and on 12 wild animals incidentally caught in pound nets in Denmark (inner Danish waters). Results indicated that although the variability between individuals is wide, the shape of the hearing curve is generally similar to previously published results from behavioral trials. Using 10-kHz frequency intervals between 10 and 160 kHz, best hearing was found between 120 and 130?kHz. Additional testing using one-third octave frequency intervals (from 16 to 160?kHz) allowed for a much faster hearing assessment, but eliminated the fine scale threshold characteristics. For further investigations, the method will be used to better understand the factors influencing sensitivity differences across individuals and to establish population-level parameters describing hearing abilities of harbor porpoises.
PubMed ID
27475168 View in PubMed
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Atherogenic risk factors and hearing thresholds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264844
Source
Audiol Neurootol. 2014;19(5):310-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Thomas Winther Frederiksen
Cecilia Høst Ramlau-Hansen
Zara Ann Stokholm
Matias Brødsgaard Grynderup
Åse Marie Hansen
Søren Peter Lund
Jesper Medom Vestergaard
Jesper Kristiansen
Jens Peter Bonde
Henrik Albert Kolstad
Source
Audiol Neurootol. 2014;19(5):310-8
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - metabolism
Female
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - physiopathology
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - blood - epidemiology
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of atherogenic risk factors on hearing thresholds. In a cross-sectional study we analyzed data from a Danish survey in 2009-2010 on physical and psychological working conditions. The study included 576 white- and blue-collar workers from children's day care units, financial services and 10 manufacturing trades. Associations between atherogenic risk factors (blood lipids, glycosylated hemoglobin, smoking habits, body mass index (BMI), and ambulatory blood pressure) and hearing thresholds were analyzed using multiple linear regression models. Adjusted results suggested associations between smoking, high BMI and triglyceride level and low high-density lipoprotein level and increased low-frequency hearing thresholds (average of pure-tone hearing thresholds at 0.25, 0.5 and 1 kHz). Furthermore, an increasing load of atherogenic risk factors seemed associated with increased low-frequency hearing thresholds, but only at a borderline level of statistical significance. Associations were generally strongest with hearing levels of the worst hearing ear. We found no statistically significant associations between atherogenic risk factors and high-frequency hearing thresholds (average of pure-tone hearing thresholds at 4, 6 and 8 kHz).
PubMed ID
25300307 View in PubMed
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Audiological evaluation and self-assessed hearing problems in subjects with single-sided congenital external ear malformations and associated conductive hearing loss.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77129
Source
Int J Audiol. 2007 Apr;46(4):162-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Priwin Claudia
Jönsson Radi
Magnusson Lennart
Hultcrantz Malou
Granström Gösta
Author Affiliation
The Department of Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery, Göteborg University, Sweden. claudia.priwin@karolinska.se
Source
Int J Audiol. 2007 Apr;46(4):162-71
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Bone Conduction - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ear, External - abnormalities - physiopathology
Ear, Inner - physiopathology
Female
Hearing Loss, Conductive - congenital - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Hearing Loss, Unilateral - congenital - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Speech Reception Threshold Test
Sweden
Abstract
Previously, unilateral hearing impairment (UHI) has been considered of little consequence. However, a recent meta-analysis of children with UHI displayed educational and behavioural problems and possible delays of speech and language development. Further, patients with UHI consequently report hearing difficulties. Our study investigated hearing function, possible inner ear protection, and self-assessed hearing problems in 57 subjects aged between 3-80 years with single-sided congenital ear malformations and conductive UHI. Pure-tone thresholds and speech recognition (quiet, noise) were measured, and all patients completed a self-assessment questionnaire. Pure-tone thresholds corresponding to sensorineural function did not significantly differ between the normal (air conduction) and affected ear (bone conduction). However, speech recognition in both quiet and in noise was normal on the non-affected side but significantly worse on the malformed side. A moderate to high degree of self-assessed hearing problems were reported. In conclusion, hearing function in the affected ear was found to be subnormal in terms of supra threshold signal processing. Furthermore, a high degree of hearing difficulty was reported. Therefore, active treatment, surgery, or hearing amplification, might be considered.
PubMed ID
17454228 View in PubMed
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Audiometric thresholds among a Canadian sample of 10 to 17 year old students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125242
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2012 Apr;131(4):2787-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Andre M Marcoux
Katya Feder
Stephen E Keith
Leonora Marro
Marianne E James
David S Michaud
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H8M5.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2012 Apr;131(4):2787-98
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests - methods
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry, Pure-Tone - methods
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Child
Female
Hearing - physiology
Hearing Loss - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Noise
Ontario - epidemiology
Perceptual Masking - physiology
Pilot Projects
Tinnitus - epidemiology - physiopathology
Abstract
A total of 237 students, 10 to 17 years of age, from 14 schools underwent hearing evaluations. Otoscopic examination, tympanometry and air-conduction pure tone audiometry was conducted at low (0.5, 1, 2 kHz) and high (4 and 8 kHz) frequencies. In all schools, hearing thresholds were measured with headphones in a portable audiometric booth. Socio-demographic information from students and their parents were collected using questionnaires. Overall, the prevalence of any hearing loss greater than 15 dB was 22.3% for low or high frequency pure tone averages. Self-reported symptoms of hearing loss, such as tinnitus, difficulty following a conversation with background noise, and having to turn up the TV/radio more than in the past, were associated with audiometric thresholds, most notably at 4 kHz. These study findings are among the first to provide a detailed characterization of hearing status in a sample of youth in a Canadian demographic.
PubMed ID
22501057 View in PubMed
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The benefit method: fitting hearing aids in noise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163781
Source
Noise Health. 2005 Oct-Dec;7(29):12-23
Publication Type
Article
Author
I. Svard
K E Spens
L. Back
B H Ahlner
M L Barrenas
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Noise Health. 2005 Oct-Dec;7(29):12-23
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Audiometry, Speech - instrumentation - methods
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Denmark
Equipment Design
Female
Hearing Aids
Hearing Loss - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Noise
Perceptual Masking - physiology
Pilot Projects
Prosthesis Fitting - instrumentation - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Speech Perception
Abstract
The most common complaint among individuals with hearing impairment is the inability to follow a conversation when several people are talking simultaneously, a noisy listening situation which is completely different from the quiet surrounding of the conventional pure tone audiometry used as basis for the hearing aid settings. The purpose of this report was to present important characteristics of the BeneFit Method (BFM), a procedure that fits the hearing aid under simulated conditions of competing speech and also a clinical pilot evaluation study comparing the BFM to the NAL-R recommendations and also to the Logic procedure, a GN resound proprietary fitting algorithm representing a modern digital hearing aid fitting procedure. Speech recognition scores in noise (SRSN) using monosyllabic words presented under different background noise levels were evaluated on 21 randomly selected subjects with hearing impairment. The subjects were fitted with the same type of hearing aid Danalogic 163D according to the BFM procedure as well as the logic procedure, the latter developed and recommended by the manufacturer. A comparison of the SRSN when using the subjects' current hearing aid fitted according to the NAL-R procedure was also made. Only the BFM procedure provided a significant SRSN improvement compared to the unaided condition (P
PubMed ID
17478965 View in PubMed
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The British Columbia's Children's Hospital tone-evoked auditory brainstem response protocol: how long do infants sleep and how much information can be obtained in one appointment?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143527
Source
Ear Hear. 2010 Oct;31(5):722-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Renée M Janssen
Laurie Usher
David R Stapells
Author Affiliation
Audiology Department, British Columbia's Children's Hospital (BCCH), Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Ear Hear. 2010 Oct;31(5):722-4
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Audiometry, Pure-Tone - methods
Auditory Threshold - physiology
British Columbia
Chloral Hydrate - administration & dosage
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Feasibility Studies
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - diagnosis - physiopathology
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - administration & dosage
Infant
Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous - physiology
Sleep - drug effects
Wakefulness
Abstract
There are few published reports providing quantitative information of clinical feasibility for tone-evoked auditory brainstem response (ABR) protocols. In this study, the authors reviewed charts of 188 ABR assessments during a 20-mo period: 116 sedated (median age, 23 mos) and 72 nonsedated (median age, 4 mos). Fifty-one percent of infants had normal thresholds. The average amount of sleep time was 58 mins for sedated assessments, during which an average of 7.6 measures were obtained; nonsedated assessments averaged 49 mins with 6.2 measures obtained. Thus, a substantial amount of both test time and information about hearing can be obtained within one ABR appointment.
PubMed ID
20473179 View in PubMed
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Dentists' hearing and exposure to high speed turbine dental drill noise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103889
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1990;86(3-4):115-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
T. Lehto
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Research Centre, Social Insurance Institution, Turku, Finland.
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1990;86(3-4):115-25
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Dental High-Speed Equipment - statistics & numerical data
Dentists
Equipment Design
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing - physiology
Hearing Disorders - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Effect of high speed turbine dental drill noise (DDN) on dentists' hearing at present and during the era of noisier drills was investigated. Hearing of two generations of dentists, power spectral density (PSD) functions of DDN from various drills and the equivalent level (LAeq) of a modern dental operatory were studied. The LAeq was 65 dB with 1 and 50% probability distribution levels of 74 and 57 dB, respectively. DDN was tonal with the spectrum peak always above 6 kHz, containing within 128 Hz frequency band 28-85% of the total noise energy in the PSD function. A cartridge type ball bearing drill from early 1960's was found noisier than an air bearing drill or a modern sealed head ball bearing drill by 8.5 and 5 dB, respectively. Sound pressure levels of DDN ranged from 68 to 79 dBA, being within safe limits. The high values earlier reported for cartridge type or worn drills could not be verified. Hearing of dentists free from clear ear pathology was found good and very similar to the reference, representing a population with no exposure to noise. There was no difference in hearing of 46 dentists 33-42 years of age, examined in 1973 and among whom there had been exposure to early and noisier drill, as compared to hearing of 56 dentists of similar age and years in dentistry, examined in 1988 and who had only been exposed to quieter drills of the 1970's. Noise dose and audiometric measurements were in agreement and indicated that DDN is not and has never been a risk to dentists' hearing.
PubMed ID
2094844 View in PubMed
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41 records – page 1 of 5.