Skip header and navigation

Refine By

153 records – page 1 of 16.

The 6 kHz acoustic dip in school-aged children in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216259
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J. Haapaniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University Central Hospital of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold
Birth weight
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, High-Frequency - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In the present study, pure-tone audiometry was used in 687 Finnish school children, aged 6-15 years, to determine the prevalence of a 6 kHz acoustic dip and related factors among three age groups. Trained audiometricians tested air conduction thresholds in a sound-proof room. A total of 57 children (8.3%) had a clear-cut dip of at least 20 dB at 6 kHz. This dip was more pronounced in older children and in boys. A thorough case history was obtained by questionnaire, with logistic regression analysis showing that low birth weight (
PubMed ID
8562032 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptable noise level (ANL) with Danish and non-semantic speech materials in adult hearing-aid users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123124
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Steen Østergaard Olsen
Johannes Lantz
Lars Holme Nielsen
K Jonas Brännström
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Research Laboratory, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. steen.olsen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Audiometry, Speech
Auditory Threshold
Correction of Hearing Impairment
Denmark
Female
Hearing Aids
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Patient satisfaction
Perceptual Masking
Persons With Hearing Impairments - psychology - rehabilitation
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Semantics
Sound Spectrography
Speech Perception
Abstract
The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is used for quantification of the amount of background noise subjects accept when listening to speech. This study investigates Danish hearing-aid users' ANL performance using Danish and non-semantic speech signals, the repeatability of ANL, and the association between ANL and outcome of the international outcome inventory for hearing aids (IOI-HA).
ANL was measured in three conditions in both ears at two test sessions. Subjects completed the IOI-HA and the ANL questionnaire.
Sixty-three Danish hearing-aid users; fifty-seven subjects were full time users and 6 were part time/non users of hearing aids according to the ANL questionnaire.
ANLs were similar to results with American English speech material. The coefficient of repeatability (CR) was 6.5-8.8 dB. IOI-HA scores were not associated to ANL.
Danish and non-semantic ANL versions yield results similar to the American English version. The magnitude of the CR indicates that ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not suitable for prediction of individual patterns of future hearing-aid use or evaluation of individual benefit from hearing-aid features. The ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not related to IOI-HA outcome.
PubMed ID
22731922 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance of background noise, working memory capacity, and auditory evoked potentials in subjects with normal hearing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120548
Source
J Am Acad Audiol. 2012 Jul-Aug;23(7):542-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
K Jonas Brännström
Edita Zunic
Aida Borovac
Tina Ibertsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics, and Audiology, Lund University, Sweden. jonas.brannstrom@med.lu.se
Source
J Am Acad Audiol. 2012 Jul-Aug;23(7):542-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory - physiology
Female
Hearing - physiology
Humans
Male
Memory, Short-Term - physiology
Noise
Reaction Time - physiology
Reference Values
Speech Perception - physiology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is a method for quantifying the amount of background noise that subjects accept when listening to speech. Large variations in ANL have been seen between normal-hearing subjects and between studies of normal-hearing subjects, but few explanatory variables have been identified.
To explore a possible relationship between a Swedish version of the ANL test, working memory capacity (WMC), and auditory evoked potentials (AEPs).
ANL, WMC, and AEP were tested in a counterbalanced order across subjects.
Twenty-one normal-hearing subjects participated in the study (14 females and 7 males; aged 20-39 yr with an average of 25.7 yr).
Reported data consists of age, pure-tone average (PTA), most comfortable level (MCL), background noise level (BNL), ANL (i.e., MCL - BNL), AEP latencies, AEP amplitudes, and WMC. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was calculated between the collected variables to investigate associations. A principal component analysis (PCA) with Varimax rotation was conducted on the collected variables to explore underlying factors and estimate interactions between the tested variables. Subjects were also pooled into two groups depending on their results on the WMC test, one group with a score lower than the average and one with a score higher than the average. Comparisons between these two groups were made using the Mann-Whitney U-test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons.
A negative association was found between ANL and WMC but not between AEP and ANL or WMC. Furthermore, ANL is derived from MCL and BNL, and a significant positive association was found between BNL and WMC. However, no significant associations were seen between AEP latencies and amplitudes and the demographic variables, MCL, and BNL. The PCA identified two underlying factors: One that contained MCL, BNL, ANL, and WMC and another that contained latency for wave Na and amplitudes for waves V and Na-Pa. Using the variables in the first factor, the findings were further explored by pooling the subjects into two groups according to their WMC (WMClow and WMChigh). It was found that the WMClow had significantly poorer BNL than the WMChigh.
The findings suggest that there is a strong relationship between BNL and WMC, while the association between MCL, ANL, and WMC seems less clear-cut.
PubMed ID
22992261 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acoustic-reflex responses in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48476
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Virtaniemi
M. Laakso
J. Nuutinen
S. Karjalainen
E. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests
Adult
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases - physiopathology
Blood Glucose - analysis
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Diabetic Angiopathies - physiopathology
Diabetic Neuropathies - physiopathology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Reaction Time - physiology
Reflex, Acoustic - physiology
Reflex, Stretch - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are especially susceptible to microangiopathic complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Microangiopathic changes are also the most important findings in histopathologic studies of the inner ear and central nervous systems in diabetic subjects. No previous studies have measured acoustic-reflex latencies (ARL) or amplitudes (ARA) in patients with IDDM. ARL and ARA reflect the function of the acoustic-reflex arch. Furthermore, possible changes in the tympanic membrane, ossicular chain, and stapedius muscle may affect the shape of acoustic-reflex. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Acoustic-reflex thresholds, latencies, and amplitudes were studied in 53 patients with IDDM and 42 randomly selected nondiabetic control subjects, aged between 20 and 40 years, using the Madsen Model ZO 73 Impedance Bridge (Madsen Electronics, Copenhagen, Denmark). Subjects with an abnormal tympanic membrane, conductive hearing loss, and known cause for hearing impairment eg, noise damage, were excluded from the study. RESULTS: There were no differences between control and diabetic subjects in the contralateral acoustic-reflex thresholds. In contrast, patients with IDDM had longer ARLs and decreased ARAs compared with those of control subjects. ARA amplitude had linear correlation with the amplitude of tympanogram, whereas ARL had no linear correlation with auditory brainstem latencies in the same study subjects. Acoustic-reflex responses in insulin-dependent diabetic patients were not associated with the duration of diabetes, metabolic control, microangiopathy, or neuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged ARLs and decreased ARAs in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes are probably caused more by the stiff middle ear system than disturbances in the brainstem.
PubMed ID
8179101 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related hearing difficulties. I. Hearing impairment, disability, and handicap--a controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8663
Source
Audiology. 1988;27(3):164-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
G. Salomon
V. Vesterager
M. Jagd
Author Affiliation
Audiology Department, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark.
Source
Audiology. 1988;27(3):164-78
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Audiometry
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Comparative Study
Consumer Satisfaction
Denmark
Female
Hearing Aids
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - diagnosis
Humans
Male
Presbycusis - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The study compares the audiological profile of a group of first-time applicants for hearing aids, a group of re-applicants and a group of non-complainers, aged 70-75 years (n = 71). In spite of overlap in range, a significant difference in thresholds and discrimination was found. The lip-reading capacity was well preserved in the elderly, but showed a significant correlation to the general health condition. The audiological benefit of hearing-aids did not increase with early fitting. General satisfaction with life was independent of satisfaction with hearing; two thirds of the patients were satisfied with their aids and used them regularly. The rest were dissatisfied and used them less than once a week. The aids were most systematically used to watch TV. Pure-tone average and handicap scaling were compared as guidelines for hearing-aid fitting. The most powerful tool to identify those in need of hearing-aids was handicap scaling based on interviews concerning self-assessed hearing difficulties.
PubMed ID
3408401 View in PubMed
Less detail

An audiological survey of officers at an infantry regiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222312
Source
Scand Audiol. 1993;22(3):147-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
B A Christiansson
K A Wintzell
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Centre Statshälsan, Ling, Växjö, Sweden.
Source
Scand Audiol. 1993;22(3):147-52
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold
Cohort Studies
Ear Protective Devices
Explosions
Firearms
Functional Laterality
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Hearing Tests
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel
Noise - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Tinnitus - etiology
Abstract
We carried out an audiological survey of 204 officers at an infantry regiment in southern Sweden. The officers were exposed to impulse noise from firearms with peak levels up to 185 dB (SPL). The audiological measurement results were summarized in four age-groups, all of which showed significant hearing loss compared to ISO 1999 (1990) database A of a non-noise-exposed male population. Even officers who claimed regular use of hearing protectors during their entire military career showed these significant hearing losses. In the survey we also studied the association of the hearing thresholds with subjective exposure to heavy detonations and the annoyance of tinnitus. We found a significant relation between exposure to heavy detonations and tinnitus.
PubMed ID
8210953 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing auditory evoked potentials of wild harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294363
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 07; 140(1):442
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2016
Author
Andreas Ruser
Michael Dähne
Abbo van Neer
Klaus Lucke
Janne Sundermeyer
Ursula Siebert
Dorian S Houser
James J Finneran
Eligius Everaarts
Jolanda Meerbeek
Rune Dietz
Signe Sveegaard
Jonas Teilmann
Author Affiliation
Institute for Terrestrial and Aquatic Wildlife Research, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Büsum, SH, Germany.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 07; 140(1):442
Date
07-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Animals
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Denmark
Evoked Potentials, Auditory - physiology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Noise - adverse effects
Phocoena - physiology
Abstract
Testing the hearing abilities of marine mammals under water is a challenging task. Sample sizes are usually low, thus limiting the ability to generalize findings of susceptibility towards noise influences. A method to measure harbor porpoise hearing thresholds in situ in outdoor conditions using auditory steady state responses of the brainstem was developed and tested. The method was used on 15 live-stranded animals from the North Sea during rehabilitation, shortly before release into the wild, and on 12 wild animals incidentally caught in pound nets in Denmark (inner Danish waters). Results indicated that although the variability between individuals is wide, the shape of the hearing curve is generally similar to previously published results from behavioral trials. Using 10-kHz frequency intervals between 10 and 160 kHz, best hearing was found between 120 and 130?kHz. Additional testing using one-third octave frequency intervals (from 16 to 160?kHz) allowed for a much faster hearing assessment, but eliminated the fine scale threshold characteristics. For further investigations, the method will be used to better understand the factors influencing sensitivity differences across individuals and to establish population-level parameters describing hearing abilities of harbor porpoises.
PubMed ID
27475168 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association of noise sensitivity with music listening, training, and aptitude.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267732
Source
Noise Health. 2015 Sep-Oct;17(78):350-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marina Kliuchko
Marja Heinonen-Guzejev
Lucia Monacis
Benjamin P Gold
Kauko V Heikkilä
Vittoria Spinosa
Mari Tervaniemi
Elvira Brattico
Source
Noise Health. 2015 Sep-Oct;17(78):350-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation - methods
Adult
Aptitude - physiology
Auditory Threshold
Evoked Potentials, Auditory
Female
Finland
Humans
Italy
Loudness Perception
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Noise
Perceptual Masking
Reaction Time
Sound
Teaching
Time
Abstract
After intensive, long-term musical training, the auditory system of a musician is specifically tuned to perceive musical sounds. We wished to find out whether a musician's auditory system also develops increased sensitivity to any sound of everyday life, experiencing them as noise. For this purpose, an online survey, including questionnaires on noise sensitivity, musical background, and listening tests for assessing musical aptitude, was administered to 197 participants in Finland and Italy. Subjective noise sensitivity (assessed with the Weinstein's Noise Sensitivity Scale) was analyzed for associations with musicianship, musical aptitude, weekly time spent listening to music, and the importance of music in each person's life (or music importance). Subjects were divided into three groups according to their musical expertise: Nonmusicians (N = 103), amateur musicians (N = 44), and professional musicians (N = 50). The results showed that noise sensitivity did not depend on musical expertise or performance on musicality tests or the amount of active (attentive) listening to music. In contrast, it was associated with daily passive listening to music, so that individuals with higher noise sensitivity spent less time in passive (background) listening to music than those with lower sensitivity to noise. Furthermore, noise-sensitive respondents rated music as less important in their life than did individuals with lower sensitivity to noise. The results demonstrate that the special sensitivity of the auditory system derived from musical training does not lead to increased irritability from unwanted sounds. However, the disposition to tolerate contingent musical backgrounds in everyday life depends on the individual's noise sensitivity.
PubMed ID
26356378 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atherogenic risk factors and hearing thresholds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264844
Source
Audiol Neurootol. 2014;19(5):310-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Thomas Winther Frederiksen
Cecilia Høst Ramlau-Hansen
Zara Ann Stokholm
Matias Brødsgaard Grynderup
Åse Marie Hansen
Søren Peter Lund
Jesper Medom Vestergaard
Jesper Kristiansen
Jens Peter Bonde
Henrik Albert Kolstad
Source
Audiol Neurootol. 2014;19(5):310-8
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - metabolism
Female
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - physiopathology
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - blood - epidemiology
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of atherogenic risk factors on hearing thresholds. In a cross-sectional study we analyzed data from a Danish survey in 2009-2010 on physical and psychological working conditions. The study included 576 white- and blue-collar workers from children's day care units, financial services and 10 manufacturing trades. Associations between atherogenic risk factors (blood lipids, glycosylated hemoglobin, smoking habits, body mass index (BMI), and ambulatory blood pressure) and hearing thresholds were analyzed using multiple linear regression models. Adjusted results suggested associations between smoking, high BMI and triglyceride level and low high-density lipoprotein level and increased low-frequency hearing thresholds (average of pure-tone hearing thresholds at 0.25, 0.5 and 1 kHz). Furthermore, an increasing load of atherogenic risk factors seemed associated with increased low-frequency hearing thresholds, but only at a borderline level of statistical significance. Associations were generally strongest with hearing levels of the worst hearing ear. We found no statistically significant associations between atherogenic risk factors and high-frequency hearing thresholds (average of pure-tone hearing thresholds at 4, 6 and 8 kHz).
PubMed ID
25300307 View in PubMed
Less detail

Audiogram configurations among older adults: prevalence and relation to self-reported hearing problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131301
Source
Int J Audiol. 2011 Nov;50(11):793-801
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Samuli Hannula
Risto Bloigu
Kari Majamaa
Martti Sorri
Elina Mäki-Torkko
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Audiol. 2011 Nov;50(11):793-801
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Pathways - physiopathology
Auditory Threshold
Bone Conduction
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Registries
Self Report
Sex Factors
Abstract
There are only a few population-based epidemiological studies on audiogram configurations among adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of different audiogram configurations among older adults. In addition, audiogram configurations among subjects reporting hearing problems were examined.
Cross-sectional, population-based, unscreened epidemiological study among older adults.
The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed.
The most prevalent audiogram configuration among men was high-frequency steeply sloping (65.3% left ear, 51.2% right ear) and among women, high-frequency gently sloping (33.0% left ear, 31.5% right ear). There were significantly more flat configurations among women than among men. Unclassified audiograms were common especially among women (17.5%). Subjects reporting hearing difficulties, difficulties in following conversation in noise, or tinnitus, more often had a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration than those not reporting.
High-frequency sloping audiogram configurations were common among older adults, and a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration was common among those reporting hearing problems.
PubMed ID
21916791 View in PubMed
Less detail

153 records – page 1 of 16.