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134 records – page 1 of 14.

The Ability of Posters to Enhance the Comfort Level with Breastfeeding in a Public Venue in Rural Newfoundland and Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279830
Source
J Hum Lact. 2016 Feb;32(1):174-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Alissa Vieth
Janine Woodrow
Janet Murphy-Goodridge
Courtney O'Neil
Barbara Roebothan
Source
J Hum Lact. 2016 Feb;32(1):174-81
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Audiovisual Aids
Breast Feeding - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Public Opinion
Rural Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The acceptance and support of breastfeeding in public venues can influence breastfeeding practices and, ultimately, the health of the population.
The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether posters targeted at the general public could improve acceptability of breastfeeding in public places.
A convenience sample of 255 participants was surveyed at shopping centers in 2 rural communities of Newfoundland and Labrador. Experimentally, questions were posed to 117 participants pre- and post-exposure to 2 specific posters designed to promote public acceptance of breastfeeding in public.
Initially, we surveyed that only 51.9% of participants indicated that they were comfortable with a woman breastfeeding anywhere in public. However, context played a role, whereby a doctor's office (84.5%) or park (81.4%) were the most acceptable public places for breastfeeding, but least acceptable was a business office environment (66.7%). Of participants, 35.4% indicated previously viewing specific posters. We used a visual analog scale to test poster viewing on the acceptability of public breastfeeding in the context of a doctor's office and a restaurant. Results of pre- versus post-viewing of the promotional posters indicated significant improvements in both scenarios: in a doctor's office (P = .035) and in a restaurant (P = .021).
Nearly 50% of the surveyed population indicated discomfort with a mother breastfeeding in public. Both cross-sectional and interventional evidence showed that posters significantly improved the reported level of comfort toward seeing breastfeeding in public.
PubMed ID
26151965 View in PubMed
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Absolute versus relative ascertainment of pedophilia in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147471
Source
Sex Abuse. 2009 Dec;21(4):431-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Ray Blanchard
Michael E Kuban
Thomas Blak
James M Cantor
Philip E Klassen
Robert Dickey
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Ray_Blanchard@camh.net
Source
Sex Abuse. 2009 Dec;21(4):431-41
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Audiovisual Aids
Child
Choice Behavior
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Forensic Psychiatry - methods
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Ontario
Pedophilia - classification - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Penile Erection - physiology - psychology
Plethysmography - methods - standards
Psychological Tests
Psychometrics
Psychophysiology - methods - standards
Referral and Consultation
Tape Recording
Abstract
There are at least two different criteria for assessing pedophilia in men: absolute ascertainment (their sexual interest in children is intense) and relative ascertainment (their sexual interest in children is greater than their interest in adults). The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition (DSM-III) used relative ascertainment in its diagnostic criteria for pedophilia; this was abandoned and replaced by absolute ascertainment in the DSM-III-R and all subsequent editions. The present study was conducted to demonstrate the continuing need for relative ascertainment, particularly in the laboratory assessment of pedophilia. A total of 402 heterosexual men were selected from a database of patients referred to a specialty clinic. These had undergone phallometric testing, a psychophysiological procedure in which their penile blood volume was monitored while they were presented with a standardized set of laboratory stimuli depicting male and female children, pubescents, and adults.The 130 men selected for the Teleiophilic Profile group responded substantially to prepubescent girls but even more to adult women; the 272 men selected for the Pedophilic Profile group responded weakly to prepubescent girls but even less to adult women. In terms of absolute magnitude, every patient in the Pedophilic Profile group had a lesser penile response to prepubescent girls than every patient in the Teleiophilic Profile group. Nevertheless, the Pedophilic Profile group had a significantly greater number of known sexual offenses against prepubescent girls, indicating that they contained a higher proportion of true pedophiles. These results dramatically demonstrate the utility-or perhaps necessity-of relative ascertainment in the laboratory assessment of erotic age-preference.
PubMed ID
19901237 View in PubMed
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Adolescent readers' responses to the booklet on sex.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215524
Source
J Adolesc Health. 1995 Apr;16(4):328-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
S. Hannonen
P. Kekki
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 1995 Apr;16(4):328-33
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Audiovisual Aids
Cohort Studies
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sex education - methods
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
To investigate the reception and the readers' reactions to a booklet about sex, which is mailed annually to all 16-year old Finnish adolescents.
Eight hundred youngsters were randomly selected to the study. A questionnaire was sent to them six weeks after the mailing of the booklet, The Sextiin. After three rounds, a response rate of 65% (N = 521) was achieved.
The booklet reached 97% of the respondents, of whom 72% read all of it. The respondents' attitudes towards and reactions to the Sextiin were mainly positive. They reacted least positively to the articles on homosexuality and masturbation. Twelve percent of the respondents indicated that they opened the condom package that was attached to the Sextiin.
The study shows that the campaign reached its target group well. As the adolescents' reactions to the Sextiin proved to be mainly positive, a claim for further use of the mass media for educational purposes is justified.
PubMed ID
7542029 View in PubMed
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Alzheimer's disease. Research turned into reality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217744
Source
Caring. 1994 Aug;13(8):40-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
P. Bowen
L. LeDuc
Author Affiliation
HomeSupport Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Caring. 1994 Aug;13(8):40-1
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - psychology - therapy
Audiovisual Aids
Canada
Caregivers - education
Home Care Services - manpower - standards
Humans
Program Evaluation
Abstract
A needs assessment revealed that a majority of home care workers feel the need for more education on Alzheimer's disease if they are taking care of such individuals. One program in Canada addressed this hole in the home care basket with a seven-module training course, which prepares its workers for the difficult task of caring for persons with AD when no one else is there.
PubMed ID
10171928 View in PubMed
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[An audio-visual course in general pathology--a new instruction system]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8895
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Nov 20;71(47):4773-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-1974
Author
B. Lagerlöf
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Nov 20;71(47):4773-5
Date
Nov-20-1974
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Methods
Pathology - education
Sweden
PubMed ID
4139401 View in PubMed
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The appeal of smokeless tobacco products among young Canadian smokers: the impact of pictorial health warnings and relative risk messages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136648
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2011 May;13(5):373-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
William E Callery
David Hammond
Richard J O'Connor
Geoffrey T Fong
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1.
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2011 May;13(5):373-83
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Audiovisual Aids
Canada
Data Collection
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Product Labeling
Smoking - adverse effects - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods
Social Perception
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Although the health risks from smokeless tobacco (ST) are lower than cigarettes, it remains unclear how smokers might use ST products, including as a substitute, a cessation aid, or concurrently with cigarette use, if at all. Additionally, there is little evidence examining the impact of health warning labels (HWL) on ST use and perceptions.
The current study investigated perceptions of ST products with and without HWL and a relative health risk (RHR) message. The study consisted of a full-factorial "between-subjects" experiment in which 3 HWL and a RHR message were systematically varied. Canadian smokers aged 18-30 years (N = 611) completed an online survey where they viewed four brands of ST packages altered according to the experimental conditions.
Approximately half of the smokers indicated that they were willing to try ST as a substitute and to help quit smoking. More than one quarter (28%) of smokers were unaware that using ST is less harmful than smoking. Pictorial HWL increased false beliefs about the RHR of ST and decreased smokers' willingness to try ST, whereas text warnings did not. Adding a RHR message communicating the lower risk of ST compared with cigarettes increased willingness to try ST when added to text HWL but decreased willingness to try ST even further when added to pictorial HWL.
The findings indicate relatively high levels of appeal for ST among young adult Canadian cigarette smokers. Pictorial HWL reduced the appeal of ST products and increased perceived risks, including the false belief that ST is equally harmful as cigarettes. Further research could consider evaluating designs of HWL on ST products that better balance absolute and RHR.
PubMed ID
21357730 View in PubMed
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[Applied suicide intervention skills training workshop]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7274
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 28;123(16):2281-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-2003
Author
Kirsti Silvola
Tordis Sørensen Høifødt
Thorbjørg Guttormsen
Olav Burkeland
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk forskning- og utviklingsavdeling, Universitetssykehuset Nord-Norge, 9291 Tromsø. kirsti.silvola@unn.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 28;123(16):2281-3
Date
Aug-28-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Audiovisual Aids
Caregivers - education - psychology
Clinical Competence
Comparative Study
Crisis Intervention - education
English Abstract
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Norway
Professional Competence
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control
Abstract
This article discusses the benefits and limitations of applied suicide intervention skills training (ASIST), a two-day intensive, interactive and practice-dominated workshop designed to help caregivers recognise and estimate risk and learn how to intervene in case of immediate risk of suicide. It could appropriately be compared to training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The workshop sensitises participants to attitudes and presents a model for suicide intervention; it is flexible and employs learning aids and audiovisual material in order to encourage a high level of involvement. A growing body of evidence from assessments suggests that the workshop enhances caregivers' sense of readiness for suicide intervention and their actual level of skills for that role. ASIST is a standardized learning experience that uses an effective implementation strategy through which local professionals are trained as instructors. It was developed by LivingWorks Education in Canada in the 1980s. In Norway, Vivat, a training programme originating in the National Suicide Prevention Plan, is in charge of implementation of the workshop and training of instructors.
PubMed ID
14508555 View in PubMed
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Approximal caries increment in adolescents after a visual aid in combination with a comprehensive open discussion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121529
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):676-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anita Häggblom
Aron Naimi-Akbar
Agneta Lith
Lena Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Dental Biomaterials and Cariology, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):676-82
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Audiovisual Aids
Case-Control Studies
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Humans
Radiography, Dental
Sweden
Abstract
To achieve greater motivation for behavioural changes; educating, motivating and supporting the patient's ability to change lifestyle factors related to the caries disease are important tasks in the prevention of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a visual aid (Visual Caries Dialogue, VCD) in combination with a comprehensive open discussion has a beneficial effect on approximal caries development among a population of young adolescents.
The study subjects were randomized to either an intervention group (n = 118), where VCD was conducted, or a control group (n = 112) receiving traditional oral healthcare information, at the annual dental health examination. The number of caries lesions reaching through the entire enamel (D2) and dentin caries reaching through the enamel into the dentin (D3) were recorded from bitewing radiographs each year, from 2001-2004. Differences between the study groups regarding at least two new approximal surfaces with caries (D2-D3) were tested using logistic regression.
The caries increment was lower in the intervention group compared to the control group. During the 3-year follow-up, 18 (15.3%) patients in the intervention group and 40 (35.7%) patients in the control group demonstrated a DS-approximal increment of at least two surfaces with a risk ratio of 2.34 (95% CI = 1.43-3.83).
Visual Caries Dialogue in combination with a comprehensive open discussion reduced approximal caries increment among young individuals. The method provides an innovative simple and low-cost way of delivering information to patients and guides busy dental healthcare personnel in the approach.
PubMed ID
22900665 View in PubMed
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Arctic audiology: trials, tribulations, and occasional successes

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1211
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1981 Aug;10(4):294-298
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1981
Author
Ilecki, HJ
Baxter, JD
Author Affiliation
McGill University
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1981 Aug;10(4):294-298
Date
Aug-1981
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Audiometry
Acculturation
Health services
Arctic Regions
Audiovisual Aids
Correction of Hearing Impairment
Culture
Hearing Aids - utilization
Hearing Disorders - etiology
Humans
Inuits
Noise - adverse effects
Otitis Media - complications
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Abstract
Efforts to provide audiologic services to the Inuit population of the Baffin Zone have frequently resulted in unexpected problems and frustrations. Often these are the product of two very different cultures coming together. This paper reviews the author's personal experiences in this regard with special reference to hearing aid attitudes, noise exposure, and the making of instructional audio-visual materials. A brief description of a recently revised hearing conservation program at Frobisher Bay is provided.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2424.
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134 records – page 1 of 14.