Skip header and navigation

Refine By

393 records – page 1 of 40.

The 6 kHz acoustic dip in school-aged children in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216259
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J. Haapaniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University Central Hospital of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold
Birth weight
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, High-Frequency - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In the present study, pure-tone audiometry was used in 687 Finnish school children, aged 6-15 years, to determine the prevalence of a 6 kHz acoustic dip and related factors among three age groups. Trained audiometricians tested air conduction thresholds in a sound-proof room. A total of 57 children (8.3%) had a clear-cut dip of at least 20 dB at 6 kHz. This dip was more pronounced in older children and in boys. A thorough case history was obtained by questionnaire, with logistic regression analysis showing that low birth weight (
PubMed ID
8562032 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptable noise level (ANL) with Danish and non-semantic speech materials in adult hearing-aid users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123124
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Steen Østergaard Olsen
Johannes Lantz
Lars Holme Nielsen
K Jonas Brännström
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Research Laboratory, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. steen.olsen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Audiometry, Speech
Auditory Threshold
Correction of Hearing Impairment
Denmark
Female
Hearing Aids
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Patient satisfaction
Perceptual Masking
Persons With Hearing Impairments - psychology - rehabilitation
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Semantics
Sound Spectrography
Speech Perception
Abstract
The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is used for quantification of the amount of background noise subjects accept when listening to speech. This study investigates Danish hearing-aid users' ANL performance using Danish and non-semantic speech signals, the repeatability of ANL, and the association between ANL and outcome of the international outcome inventory for hearing aids (IOI-HA).
ANL was measured in three conditions in both ears at two test sessions. Subjects completed the IOI-HA and the ANL questionnaire.
Sixty-three Danish hearing-aid users; fifty-seven subjects were full time users and 6 were part time/non users of hearing aids according to the ANL questionnaire.
ANLs were similar to results with American English speech material. The coefficient of repeatability (CR) was 6.5-8.8 dB. IOI-HA scores were not associated to ANL.
Danish and non-semantic ANL versions yield results similar to the American English version. The magnitude of the CR indicates that ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not suitable for prediction of individual patterns of future hearing-aid use or evaluation of individual benefit from hearing-aid features. The ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not related to IOI-HA outcome.
PubMed ID
22731922 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptable noise level: repeatability with Danish and non-semantic speech materials for adults with normal hearing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124904
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Jul;51(7):557-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Steen Østergaard Olsen
Lars Holme Nielsen
Johannes Lantz
K Jonas Brännström
Author Affiliation
Research Laboratory, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. steen.olsen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Jul;51(7):557-63
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Audiometry, Speech - methods
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Perceptual Masking
Predictive value of tests
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Semantics
Speech Perception
Young Adult
Abstract
The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli.
ANL was measured in both ears at two test sessions separated by a period ranging from 12 to 77 days. At each session the measurements at the first and the second ear were separated in time by 15-30 minutes. Bland-Altman plots and calculation of the coefficient of repeatability (CR) were used to estimate the repeatability.
Thirty nine normal-hearing subjects.
The ANL CR was 6.0-8.9 dB for repeated tests separated by about 15-30 minutes and 7.2-10.2 dB for repeated tests separated by 12 days or more.
The ANL test has poor repeatability when assessed with Danish and non-semantic speech materials on normal-hearing subjects. The same CR among hearing-impaired subjects would imply too poor repeatability to predict individual patterns of future hearing-aid use.
PubMed ID
22537032 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance of background noise, working memory capacity, and auditory evoked potentials in subjects with normal hearing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120548
Source
J Am Acad Audiol. 2012 Jul-Aug;23(7):542-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
K Jonas Brännström
Edita Zunic
Aida Borovac
Tina Ibertsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics, and Audiology, Lund University, Sweden. jonas.brannstrom@med.lu.se
Source
J Am Acad Audiol. 2012 Jul-Aug;23(7):542-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory - physiology
Female
Hearing - physiology
Humans
Male
Memory, Short-Term - physiology
Noise
Reaction Time - physiology
Reference Values
Speech Perception - physiology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is a method for quantifying the amount of background noise that subjects accept when listening to speech. Large variations in ANL have been seen between normal-hearing subjects and between studies of normal-hearing subjects, but few explanatory variables have been identified.
To explore a possible relationship between a Swedish version of the ANL test, working memory capacity (WMC), and auditory evoked potentials (AEPs).
ANL, WMC, and AEP were tested in a counterbalanced order across subjects.
Twenty-one normal-hearing subjects participated in the study (14 females and 7 males; aged 20-39 yr with an average of 25.7 yr).
Reported data consists of age, pure-tone average (PTA), most comfortable level (MCL), background noise level (BNL), ANL (i.e., MCL - BNL), AEP latencies, AEP amplitudes, and WMC. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was calculated between the collected variables to investigate associations. A principal component analysis (PCA) with Varimax rotation was conducted on the collected variables to explore underlying factors and estimate interactions between the tested variables. Subjects were also pooled into two groups depending on their results on the WMC test, one group with a score lower than the average and one with a score higher than the average. Comparisons between these two groups were made using the Mann-Whitney U-test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons.
A negative association was found between ANL and WMC but not between AEP and ANL or WMC. Furthermore, ANL is derived from MCL and BNL, and a significant positive association was found between BNL and WMC. However, no significant associations were seen between AEP latencies and amplitudes and the demographic variables, MCL, and BNL. The PCA identified two underlying factors: One that contained MCL, BNL, ANL, and WMC and another that contained latency for wave Na and amplitudes for waves V and Na-Pa. Using the variables in the first factor, the findings were further explored by pooling the subjects into two groups according to their WMC (WMClow and WMChigh). It was found that the WMClow had significantly poorer BNL than the WMChigh.
The findings suggest that there is a strong relationship between BNL and WMC, while the association between MCL, ANL, and WMC seems less clear-cut.
PubMed ID
22992261 View in PubMed
Less detail

[ACOUSTIC TRAUMA DUE TO FIRWORKS DIAGNOSED BY EAR SPECIALISTS IN THE PROVINCE.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45235
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1964 Dec 10;126:1689-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1964
Author
P O JENSEN
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1964 Dec 10;126:1689-92
Date
Dec-10-1964
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Audiometry
Child
Deafness
Denmark
Explosions
Geriatrics
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced
PubMed ID
14257977 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related hearing difficulties. I. Hearing impairment, disability, and handicap--a controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8663
Source
Audiology. 1988;27(3):164-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
G. Salomon
V. Vesterager
M. Jagd
Author Affiliation
Audiology Department, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark.
Source
Audiology. 1988;27(3):164-78
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Audiometry
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Comparative Study
Consumer Satisfaction
Denmark
Female
Hearing Aids
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - diagnosis
Humans
Male
Presbycusis - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The study compares the audiological profile of a group of first-time applicants for hearing aids, a group of re-applicants and a group of non-complainers, aged 70-75 years (n = 71). In spite of overlap in range, a significant difference in thresholds and discrimination was found. The lip-reading capacity was well preserved in the elderly, but showed a significant correlation to the general health condition. The audiological benefit of hearing-aids did not increase with early fitting. General satisfaction with life was independent of satisfaction with hearing; two thirds of the patients were satisfied with their aids and used them regularly. The rest were dissatisfied and used them less than once a week. The aids were most systematically used to watch TV. Pure-tone average and handicap scaling were compared as guidelines for hearing-aid fitting. The most powerful tool to identify those in need of hearing-aids was handicap scaling based on interviews concerning self-assessed hearing difficulties.
PubMed ID
3408401 View in PubMed
Less detail

The aging ear: an otomicroscopic and tympanometric study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7249
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2004 Jan;124(1):69-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Niels Christian Stenklev
Ole Vik
Einar Laukli
Author Affiliation
ENT Department, University Hospital of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. niels.christian.stenklev@unn.no
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2004 Jan;124(1):69-76
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Otitis Media - diagnosis - epidemiology
Otoscopy
Reference Values
Sex Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To analyze changes in tympanometric measures with age and to study some otitis-related issues in the elderly (> or = 60 years) population. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was designed as a combination of a cross-sectional survey and a controlled study. We studied a random sample of 232 elderly subjects using an extended battery of audiological tests, including pure-tone audiometry. tympanometry with a probe frequency of 226 Hz, otomicroscopy and a standardized questionnaire. A sample of 60 otologically normal subjects were selected for comparative analysis with young healthy controls, and for description of age-related changes and gender differences. RESULTS: Using linear regression analyses of ear canal volume, middle ear pressure and tympanic membrane compliance on age, no consistently significant change in these parameters with age was found. When these measures were compared between the elderly and the controls, using parametric and non-parametric statistical tests, no significant differences were found for either gender. The only significant gender difference was found for ear canal volume, which was greater for elderly males than for elderly females In the unscreened elderly sample, the adjusted prevalence for reported previous or current otitis media was 15-27% of the population (95% CI). The adjusted prevalence for reported previous or current chronic otitis media (COM) or sequelae thereof was 1-7% (95% CI). With the exception of cerumen obstruction, the prevalence of outer ear canal-related complaints was 1-7% (95% CI). There were some discrepancies between these reported complaints and the findings at otomicroscopy. Although elderly subjects with COM were found to have poorer hearing at speech frequencies than normal elderly subjects. no such effect was found in subjects with scarring or atrophy of the tympanic membrane. The effect of pathological findings at otomicroscopy on tympanometric measures in the elderly sample was highly variable and no consistent association was found. CONCLUSIONS: No change in middle ear sound transmission, as assessed by tympanometry, occurs with normal aging. Ear canal volume is smaller in elderly females than elderly males, which is potentially relevant to the study of otoacoustic emissions in the elderly. The estimated prevalence of ear canal-related problems, excluding cerumen obstruction, is of such a magnitude that the introduction of partially implanted hearing aids may be warranted in our elderly population.
PubMed ID
14977081 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air space reduction tympanomastoidectomy repairs difficult perforations more reliably than tympanoplasty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115007
Source
Laryngoscope. 2014 Jun;124 Suppl 3:S1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Miriam I Redleaf
Author Affiliation
Department of Otology/Neurotology, University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
Source
Laryngoscope. 2014 Jun;124 Suppl 3:S1-13
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Mastoid - surgery
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Tympanic Membrane - surgery
Tympanic Membrane Perforation - surgery
Tympanoplasty - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Air space reduction tympanomastoidectomy improves outcomes over tympanoplasty in repairing tympanic membrane perforations in the presence of unfavorable risk factors.
Retrospective review of 67 subjects' 87 operations.
Interventions were tympanoplasty versus air space reduction tympanomastoidectomy. Risk factors were contracted mastoid air cells, previous failed operations, descent from the indigenous peoples of the Americas, and middle/ear mastoid volumes l
PubMed ID
23553170 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaskan plan to fight otitis media among Native people has broad impact.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2691
Source
National Hearing Aid Journal. September:10-11, 40.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968
Author
Woodman, B.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Indian Health Service
Source
National Hearing Aid Journal. September:10-11, 40.
Date
1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Otitis media
Hearing deficiency
Hearing aid
Audiometry
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2462.
Less detail

393 records – page 1 of 40.