Skip header and navigation

Refine By

329 records – page 2 of 33.

American Indian and Alaska Native Men's Use of Sexual Health Services, 2006-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291987
Source
Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2017 Sep; 49(3):181-189
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Megan A Cahn
S Marie Harvey
Matthew A Town
Author Affiliation
Postdoctoral research fellow, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR.
Source
Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2017 Sep; 49(3):181-189
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska Natives - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Misuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Men's Health - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment
Reproductive Health Services - utilization
Sex Counseling - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Health - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
American Indian and Alaska Native men experience poorer sexual health than white men. Barriers related to their sex and racial identity may prevent them from seeking care; however, little is known about this population's use of sexual health services.
Sexual health service usage was examined among 923 American Indian and Alaska Native men and 5,322 white men aged 15-44 who participated in the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth. Logistic regression models explored differences in service use by race and examined correlates of use among American Indians and Alaska Natives.
Among men aged 15-19 and those aged 35-44, men with incomes greater than 133% of the federal poverty level, men with private insurance, those living in the Northeast and those living in rural areas, American Indians and Alaska Natives were more likely than whites to use STD or HIV services (odds ratios, 1.5-3.2). The odds of birth control service use did not differ by race. Differences in service use were found among American Indian and Alaska Native men: For example, those with a usual source of care had elevated odds of using sexual health services (1.9-3.4), while those reporting no recent testicular exam had reduced odds of using these services (0.3-0.4).
This study provides baseline data on American Indian and Alaska Native men's use of sexual health services. Research exploring these men's views on these services is needed to help develop programs that better serve them.
PubMed ID
28758709 View in PubMed
Less detail

An examination of cancer risk beliefs among adults from Toronto's Somali, Chinese, Russian and Spanish-speaking communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190520
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):138-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Judy A Paisley
Jess Haines
Marlene Greenberg
Mary-Jo Makarchuk
Sarah Vogelzang
Krystyna Lewicki
Author Affiliation
School of Nutrition, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3. j2paisle@ryerson.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):138-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Culture
Disease Susceptibility - ethnology
Female
Food Supply - standards
Health education
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology - psychology
Ontario
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Somalia - ethnology
Spain - ethnology
Abstract
Canada's growing ethnocultural diversity challenges health professionals to develop culturally sensitive cancer prevention strategies. Little is known about the ethnocultural specificity of cancer risk beliefs. This qualitative pilot study examined cancer risk beliefs, focusing on diet, among adults from Toronto's Somali, Chinese, Russian, and Spanish-speaking communities.
Group interviews (n = 4) were conducted with convenience samples of adults (total n = 45) from four ethnocultural communities (total 45 participants).
The constant comparison method of data analysis identified three common themes: knowledge of cancer risk factors, concern about the food supply, and the roles of spiritual and emotional well-being. Two areas of contrasting belief concerning specific mediators of cancer risk were identified.
Findings support the investigation of cultural-specific health promotion strategies emphasizing both the maintenance of traditional cancer protective eating practices and the adoption of additional healthy eating practices among new Canadians. More research is needed to enhance our understanding of ethnoculturally specific cancer risk beliefs and practices to ensure the cultural relevance of programming.
PubMed ID
11963519 View in PubMed
Less detail

An examination of stress among Aboriginal women and men with diabetes in Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179442
Source
Ethn Health. 2004 May;9(2):189-212
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Yoshi Iwasaki
Judith Bartlett
John O'Neil
Author Affiliation
Health, Leisure and Human Performance Research Institute, 102 Frank Kennedy Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Mannitoba, Canada. iwasakiy@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
Ethn Health. 2004 May;9(2):189-212
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Diabetes Mellitus - economics - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Female
Health Expenditures
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Poverty
Self Care - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - etiology
Abstract
In this study, a series of focus groups were conducted to gain an understanding of the nature of stress among Canadian Aboriginal women and men living with diabetes. Specifically, attention was given to the meanings Aboriginal peoples with diabetes attach to their lived experiences of stress, and the major sources or causes of stress in their lives. The key common themes identified are concerned not only with health-related issues (i.e. physical stress of managing diabetes, psychological stress of managing diabetes, fears about the future, suffering the complications of diabetes, and financial aspects of living with diabetes), but also with marginal economic conditions (e.g. poverty, unemployment); trauma and violence (e.g. abuse, murder, suicide, missing children, bereavement); and cultural, historical, and political aspects linked to the identity of being Aboriginal (e.g. 'deep-rooted racism', identity problems). These themes are, in fact, acknowledged not as mutually exclusive, but as intertwined. Furthermore, the findings suggest that it is important to give attention to diversity in the Aboriginal population. Specifically, Métis-specific stressors, as well as female-specific stressors, were identified. An understanding of stress experienced by Aboriginal women and men with diabetes has important implications for policy and programme planning to help eliminate or reduce at-risk stress factors, prevent stress-related illnesses, and enhance their health and life quality.
PubMed ID
15223576 View in PubMed
Less detail

An international comparative multicenter study of assessment of dental appearance using computer-aided image manipulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33734
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
G E Carlsson
I V Wagner
P. Odman
K. Ekstrand
M. MacEntee
C. Marinello
T. Nanami
R K Ow
H. Sato
C. Speer
J R Strub
T. Watanabe
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Göteborg University, Sweden. g_carlsson@odontologi.gu.se
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dental Technicians - psychology
Dentists - psychology
Esthetics, Dental - psychology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of the present investigation was to perform an international multicenter comparison of dental appearance as evaluated by dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants were drawn from three groups: 203 dentists, 197 dental technicians and 254 nondental subjects. The methods developed in a previous study in Sweden were applied again in seven centers located in six countries. A questionnaire, accompanied by five sets of computer-manipulated images portraying one man and one woman, was used to prompt and record responses to different aspects of dental appearance and function. RESULTS: The questionnaire revealed that both the dental appearance and function of teeth were important to most of the participants, but three quarters of the participants did indicate that good dental function was more important that esthetics. More women (30%) than men (18%), however, placed greater importance on appearance. Age or gender did not influence judgments of the computer-manipulated images, although judgments did vary greatly within the three groups and between the centers. Nonetheless, highly colored teeth were preferred more often by nondental subjects than by dentists or dental technicians. CONCLUSION: Computer-aided image manipulation shows promise as a method for investigating the significance of dental-related beliefs, especially those relating to esthetics, in different population groups. The evaluation of dental appearance and function in this study indicated that dental function is held in greater regard, and that the significance of dental appearance varies widely among dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects.
PubMed ID
9728119 View in PubMed
Less detail

The artistry and ability of traditional women healers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185389
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. strut005@tc.umn.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Role
United States
Abstract
In a phenomenological research study with a purposeful sample, 6 Ojibwa and Cree indigenous women healers from Canada and the United States shared their experience of being a traditional healer. Using stories obtained during open-ended, unstructured interviews, in this article I depict the lives, backgrounds, and traditional healing practices of women who, in the past, have not been afforded an opportunity to dialogue about their healing art and abilities. The methods of these women healers, their arts and their gifts, are different from those of Western conventional medicine because of dissimilar world views related to health and illness. An increased awareness of health care providers related to the ancient art of traditional healing currently practiced in communities by gifted women who provide culturally specific holistic healing and health care is essential.
PubMed ID
12746005 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the effectiveness of informational video clips on Iranian immigrants' attitudes toward and intention to use the BC HealthGuide Program in the greater Vancouver area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164147
Source
MedGenMed. 2007;9(1):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Iraj Poureslami
Irving Rootman
Ellen Balka
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Promotion Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. pouresla@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
MedGenMed. 2007;9(1):12
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Follow-Up Studies
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Interviews as Topic - methods
Iran - ethnology
Middle Aged
Television
Video Recording - methods
Abstract
Consumer-directed health information resources hold great potential for improving public health and easing the demand on health systems. Their value, however, depends largely on the ability of their intended users to access and use them effectively. Little is known about whether British Columbia's ethnocultural communities are using the British Columbia (BC) Ministry of Health's BC HealthGuide (BCHG) program, and if so, when and for what purposes they use the services, as well as level of satisfaction with and users' perceptions of the resources. This study investigated attitudes toward and perceptions of the BCHG program, as well as use patterns and satisfaction levels, within the Iranian community of the Greater Vancouver Area (GVA)--among BC's largest and fastest-growing Middle Eastern immigrant communities--and explored a model for introducing the BCHG program to ethnic communities in the GVA and BC.
In a 2-stage quasi-experimental design, with a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods, data obtained from structured telephone surveys, in-person interviews, and focus groups involving a randomly selected sample of the target population were analyzed before and after intervention with audiovisual health information: a series of culturally relevant informative video clips developed by direct participation of the community and aired on local television channels in the fall of 2004.
There was low awareness and low utilization of the BCHG program among participants at the beginning of this study. Furthermore, many participants in the initial stage of this study cautioned that self-care resources in general are unsuited to Iranian culture, due to widespread distrust of health advice received via telephone or the Internet, and due to the strong value placed on health advice received directly from a professional medical doctor. Nonetheless, attitudes, perceptions, and self-reported utilization rates of the BCHG program improved substantially among the participants of this study following the screening of culturally appropriate, targeted promotional videos. Participants almost unanimously reported that watching the videos had encouraged them to use the BCHG program, and that they intended to promote the resources to others. In addition, the majority of participants who had accessed at least one of the BCHG program resources reported being satisfied with the services that they had received, and improved utilization rates were maintained at the follow-up focus group stage. At the same time, participants cautioned that gaining the confidence of the wider Iranian community in BC and increasing service utilization will require considerable time and effort. In particular, they suggested using a variety of media and communication channels, carefully selecting the health messengers, and targeting messages to specific community subgroups.
The findings of this study strongly suggest that Iranians living in the GVA are open to alternatives to routine healthcare services, including the use of preventive and self-care resources. However, awareness levels and utilization rates of the BCHG program among the GVA's Iranian immigrant population have until now been low. The noticeable and sustained improvement to attitudes, perceptions, and self-reported utilization rates of the BCHG program among Iranian participants in this study after watching culturally appropriate promotional videos indicates the potential to modify cultural beliefs in regard to the delivery of preventive health information if the relevant messages are delivered appropriately. By carefully considering the demographic and cultural characteristics of the various ethnic communities living in BC, and by targeting promotional activities and services directly to these individual communities, the BCHG program could improve awareness and utilization rates within these communities.
Notes
Cites: Med Care. 2001 Aug;39(8):836-4711468502
Cites: Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2001 Fall;17(4):590-60011758302
Cites: Aust Fam Physician. 2001 Nov;30(11):1108-1211759465
Cites: Nihon Eiseigaku Zasshi. 2002 May;57(2):490-712061095
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S5-916805153
Cites: JAMA. 1980 Jun 13;243(22):2317-207373798
Cites: Bull Med Libr Assoc. 1996 Apr;84(2):253-68826633
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S26-3016805158
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2006;8(2):e916867972
Cites: J Urban Health. 2003 Mar;80(1):14-47; discussion 48-6012612096
PubMed ID
17435621 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Attitudes and subjective norms of Quebecian adolescent mothers towards breastfeeding].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189904
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 May-Jun;93(3):198-202
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lise Ross
Céline Goulet
Author Affiliation
Collège du Vieux-Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 May-Jun;93(3):198-202
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Feeding - ethnology - psychology
Child
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Mothers - psychology
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
To describe the attitudes and subjective norms of female adolescents toward breastfeeding, and to determine whether these are influenced by age, education level, mother tongue, place of birth, exposure to breastfeeding and intention to breastfeed their children.
236 female adolescents, from four schools randomly selected among those offering education levels from secondary 1 to V 4, answered a questionnaire based on the theory of reasoned action.
Female adolescents showed overall positive attitudes towards breastfeeding, but negative subjective norms. Older girls who were breastfed as infants and who originated from foreign countries showed the most positive attitudes towards breastfeeding.
Even though adolescent girls showed overall positive attitudes, several were unable to make up their mind. This result could be attributed to a lack of knowledge and low exposure to breastfeeding mothers. The school system plays an important role in health promotion and should expose all students to the art of breastfeeding through its health classes.
PubMed ID
12050987 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes to compliance with tuberculosis treatment among women and men in Vietnam.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52539
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Oct;3(10):862-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
E. Johansson
N H Long
V K Diwan
A. Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.johansson@phs.ki.se
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Oct;3(10):862-8
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Comparative Study
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Focus Groups - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology - psychology
Prejudice
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - drug therapy - economics - ethnology - psychology
Vietnam - epidemiology
Abstract
SETTING: A study carried out in 1996 in four districts representing south and north as well as urban and rural areas of Vietnam. OBJECTIVE: To explore gender differences in knowledge, beliefs and attitudes towards tuberculosis and its treatment, and how these factors influence patients' compliance with treatment. DESIGN: Sixteen focus group discussions were performed by a multi-disciplinary research team from Vietnam and Sweden. Analysis was performed using modified Grounded Theory technique, specifically evaluating gender differences. RESULTS: Women were believed to be more compliant than men. Insufficient knowledge and individual cost during treatment were reported as main obstacles to compliance among men (poor patient compliance), while sensitivity to interaction with health staff and stigma in society (poor health staff and system compliance) were reported as the main obstacles among women. CONCLUSIONS: It is time to adopt a more comprehensive and gender-sensitive approach to compliance, which incorporates patient compliance, doctor compliance and system compliance, in order to fully support individual patients in their efforts to comply with treatment.
PubMed ID
10524582 View in PubMed
Less detail

329 records – page 2 of 33.