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Acute pain and use of local anesthesia: tooth drilling and childbirth labor pain beliefs among Anglo-Americans, Chinese, and Scandinavians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52621
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Moore
I. Brødsgaard
T K Mao
M L Miller
S F Dworkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-6370, USA. roding@u.washington.edu
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia, Local - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Dental Cavity Preparation
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Taiwan
United States
Abstract
Differences in ethnic beliefs about the perceived need for local anesthesia for tooth drilling and childbirth labor were surveyed among Anglo-Americans, Mandarin Chinese, and Scandinavians (89 dentists and 251 patients) matched for age, gender, and occupation. Subjects matched survey questionnaire items selected from previously reported interview results to estimate (a) their beliefs about the possible use of anesthetic for tooth drilling and labor pain compared with other possible remedies and (b) the choice of pain descriptors associated with the use of nonuse of anesthetic, including descriptions of injection pain. Multidimensional scaling, Gamma, and Chi-square statistics as well as odds ratios and Spearman's correlations were employed in the analysis. Seventy-seven percent of American informants reported the use of anesthetics as possible remedies for drilling and 51% reported the use of anesthetics for labor pain compared with 34% that reported the use of anesthetics among Chinese for drilling and 5% for labor pain and 70% among Scandinavians for drilling and 35% for labor pain. Most Americans and Swedes described tooth-drilling sensations as sharp, most Chinese used descriptors such as sharp and "sourish" (suan), and most Danes used words like shooting (jagende). By rank, Americans described labor pain as cramping, sharp, and excruciating, Chinese used words like sharp, intermittent, and horrible, Danes used words like shooting, tiring, and sharp, and Swedes used words like tiring, "good," yet horrible. Preferred pain descriptors for drilling, birth, and injection pains varied significantly by ethnicity. Results corroborated conclusions of a qualitative study about pain beliefs in relation to perceived needs for anesthetic in tooth drilling. Samples used to obtain the results were estimated to approach qualitative representativity for these urban ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
9790007 View in PubMed
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Advantages of breastfeeding according to Turkish mother's living in Istanbul and Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60075
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1988;27(4):405-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
T. Koctürk
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Karolinska Institute, St Göran's Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1988;27(4):405-10
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Feeding
Contraception
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Parity
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
As part of a cross-sectional study, carried out among Turkish mother-infant pairs, the mothers of 269 infants living in Istanbul and 30 living in Stockholm were asked their opinions as to the advantages and/or disadvantages of breastfeeding. The answers were categorized according to the attributes mentioned, quantified and related to the socio-economic status of the area of residence, maternal education, origin, current infant feeding practice and contraceptive method. In Istanbul, 63% of the responses stressed some advantage and 31% some disadvantage of breastfeeding. The contraceptive effect was considered the major advantage and the possibility of milk insufficiency the major disadvantage. In Stockholm, the nutritional value of breastfeeding was considered the most important advantage. No disadvantage was mentioned in Stockholm, despite the fact that breastfeeding durations among the immigrant group was shorter than that of the group in Istanbul. The implications of the responses are analyzed. It is hypothesized that mother-centered advantages, such as the birth-spacing effect of breastfeeding, may be more important motivators for continuing breastfeeding among women living under less-advantaged social conditions, and that, if this is true for some groups of mothers, the infant-centered emphasis in the breastfeeding promotional messages may need modification to include the interests of the mothers, as well.
PubMed ID
3262926 View in PubMed
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Being different and vulnerable: experiences of immigrant African women who have been circumcised and sought maternity care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63115
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Vanja Berggren
Staffan Bergström
Anna-Karin Edberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):50-7
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa, Eastern - ethnology
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Circumcision, Female - ethnology - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Maternal Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Professional-Patient Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to explore the encounters with the health care system in Sweden of women from Somalia, Eritrea, and Sudan who have been genitally cut. A qualitative study was performed through interviews with 22 women originally from Somalia, Sudan, and Eritrea who were living in Sweden. The women experienced being different and vulnerable, suffering from being abandoned and mutilated, and they felt exposed in the encounter with the Swedish health care personnel and tried to adapt to a new cultural context. The results of this study indicate a need for more individualized, culturally adjusted care and support and a need for systematic education about female genital cutting for Swedish health care workers.
PubMed ID
16410436 View in PubMed
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Construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older in the north of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87255
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Feb;17(4):451-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Aléx Lena
Hammarström Anne
Norberg Astrid
Lundman Berit
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.alex@nurs.umu.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Feb;17(4):451-9
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Family - ethnology
Friends - psychology
Gender Identity
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Men - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Personal Satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Concept
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Behavior
Social Values
Sweden
Work - psychology
Abstract
AIM: The aim was to analyse the construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older. BACKGROUND: All societies have a gender order, constructed from multiple ideas of what is seen as feminine and masculine. As the group of men aged 85 and older is increasing in size and their demand for care will increase, we must recognize the importance of studying these men and various discourses of masculinities. DESIGN: Qualitative explorative. METHODS: Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse thematic narratives. Masculinity theories provided the point of departure for the analysis. RESULTS: The analysis coalesced into three masculinities. 'Being in the male centre', developed from subthemes as: taking pride in one's work and economic situation; being in the centre in relation to others; regarding women as sexual objects; and belonging to a select group. 'Striving to maintain the male facade' developed from subthemes as: emphasizing 'important' connections; having feelings of loss; striving to maintain old norms and rejecting the fact of being old. 'Being related' was formulated from subthemes as: feeling at home with domestic duties; being concerned; accepting one's own aging; and reflecting on life. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates the importance of being aware of the existence of multiple masculinities, in contrast to the generally unproblematic and unsubtle particular healthcare approaches which consider men as simply belonging to one masculinity. Relevance to clinical practice. Diverse masculinities probably affect encounters between men and healthcare providers and others who work with an older population and therefore our results are of importance in a caring context.
PubMed ID
18205678 View in PubMed
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Cultural challenges in end-of-life care: reflections from focus groups' interviews with hospice staff in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72205
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Mar;31(3):623-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
S. Ekblad
A. Marttila
M. Emilsson
Author Affiliation
Unit for Immigrant Environment and Health, National Swedish Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden. solvig.ekblad@ipm.ki.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Mar;31(3):623-30
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospice Care - psychology
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Cultural challenges in end-of-life care: reflections from focus groups' interviews with hospice staff in Stockholm During the past few decades, Swedish society has changed from a society with a few ethnic groups to one with over a hundred groups of different ethnic backgrounds, languages and religions. As society is becoming increasingly multicultural, cultural issues are also becoming an important feature in health care, particularly in end-of-life care where the questions of existential nature are of great importance. However, cultural issues in health care, especially at hospices, have not been studied sufficiently in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to gather reflections about cultural issues among hospice staff after a 3-day seminar in multicultural end-of-life care, by using a qualitative focus groups method. The 19 participants (majority nurses) were divided into three groups, one per hospice unit. A discussion guide was developed with the following themes: 1) post-training experiences of working with patients with multicultural background; 2) experiences gained by participating in the course of multicultural end-of-life care; 3) post-training reflections about one's own culture; 4) ideas or thoughts regarding work with patients from other cultures arising from the training; and 5) the need for further training in multicultural end-of-life care. One of the study's main findings was that to better understand other cultures it is important to raise awareness about the staff's own culture and to pay attention to culture especially in the context of the individual. The findings from focus groups provide insight regarding the need for planning flexible training in cultural issues to match the needs of the staff at the hospice units studied.
PubMed ID
10718882 View in PubMed
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Diabetes self-care and educational needs in Tanzanian and Swedish diabetic patients: a cross-cultural study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47480
Source
Trop Doct. 2002 Oct;32(4):212-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Bibbi Smide
Leif Ekman
Karin Wikblad
Author Affiliation
Uppsala University, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Sweden.
Source
Trop Doct. 2002 Oct;32(4):212-6
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Curriculum - standards
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - metabolism - psychology - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - metabolism - psychology - therapy
Educational Measurement
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education - standards
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Tanzania
Abstract
The aim was to compare self-care and perceived educational needs in adult Tanzanian and Swedish diabetic patients. One hundred and fifty Tanzanians were matched with Swedes (n=150). All 300 patients filled in questionnaires about their self-care and educational needs. The comparison indicated the Tanzanians were almost as satisfied with their self-care as the Swedes, but Tanzanians were dissatisfied with the lack of drugs and wanted more diabetes education while the Swedes were more dissatisfied with their own self-care behaviour. None of theTanzanians monitored their own blood glucose, whereas half the patients in the Swedish group did so weekly or monthly. The findings suggest that diabetes education in Tanzania should concentrate more on basic diabetes knowledge. In Sweden, however, the main points to be stressed should be life style and psychology.
PubMed ID
12405300 View in PubMed
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Different ways of understanding the construct of successful aging: Iranian immigrants speak about what aging well means to them.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79810
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2006 Mar-Jun;21(1-2):1-23
Publication Type
Article
Author
Torres Sandra
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Sciences, Mälardalen University, Box 883, 72123, Västerås, Sweden. sandra.torres@mdh.se
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2006 Mar-Jun;21(1-2):1-23
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Diversity
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Models, Theoretical
Social Values - ethnology
Sweden
Abstract
This article presents the variations in themes and notions of successful aging that were found in a project that aimed to shed light on the value orientations that people prefer and the understandings of successful aging that they uphold. The project, which aimed also to study the way in which the process of migration challenges the notions in question, shed light on the various types of logic that Iranian immigrants to Sweden use when trying to make sense of the construct of successful aging. This article departs from these variations and discusses, among other things, the inevitable decay with which the aging process seems to be associated; the different purpose-related ideologies that people use when trying to explain how the decay in question ought to be handled; the way in which time-related ideas influence the manner in which notions of aging well are framed; the manner in which divergent views regarding activity shape the understandings of successful aging that people uphold; and the way in which ideas regarding autonomy and dependence shape the way in which one defines a good old age. The complexity of logic types utilized by the informants suggests that, if researchers are to further their understanding of the meaning of the construct of successful aging, they need to dismantle people's ideas as well as the way in which they use culture when trying to make sense of what aging well entails. The article finishes with a brief discussion regarding the importance of intracultural variation and suggests that researchers need a better understanding of culture's impact on the manner in which the construct in question is understood if they are to develop the successful aging paradigm in a culturally informed manner.
PubMed ID
17106646 View in PubMed
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The encounters that rupture the myth: contradictions in midwives' descriptions and explanations of circumcised women immigrants' sexuality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51957
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Sep;25(8):743-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Amy Leval
Catarina Widmark
Carol Tishelman
Beth Maina Ahlberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Sep;25(8):743-60
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Anecdotes
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Circumcision, Female - ethnology - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Midwifery - standards
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sweden
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to analyze how Swedish midwives (n = 26) discuss sexuality in circumcised African women patients. In focus groups and interviews, discussions concentrated on care provided to circumcised women, training received for this care, and midwives' perceptions of female circumcision. An analytic expansion was performed for discussions pertaining to sexuality and gender roles. Results from the analysis show the following: (1) ethnocentric projections of sexuality; (2) a knowledge paradox regarding circumcision and sexuality; (3) the view of the powerless circumcised women; and (4) the fact that maternity wards function as meeting places between gender and culture where the encounters with men allow masculine hegemonic norms to be ruptured. We conclude that an increased understanding of cultural epistemology is needed to ensure quality care. The encounters that take place in obstetrical care situations can provide a space where gender and culture as prescribed norms can be questioned.
PubMed ID
15371079 View in PubMed
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Equitable abortion care - A challenge for health care providers. Experiences from abortion care encounters with immigrant women in Stockholm, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281492
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Dec;10:14-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Elin C Larsson
Sarah Fried
Birgitta Essén
Marie Klingberg-Allvin
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Dec;10:14-18
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Communication Barriers
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Family Planning Services - organization & administration
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Humans
National Health Programs
Qualitative Research
Reproductive Health Services - utilization
Sweden
Abstract
To explore health care providers' experiences of providing care to immigrant women seeking abortion care.
A qualitative study including interviews with ten midwives and three medical doctors at four abortion clinics in the Stockholm area. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis.
Initially, health care providers were reluctant to make statements concerning the specific needs among immigrant women. Yet, the health care providers sometimes found it challenging to deal with the specific needs among immigrant, mostly non-European, women. Three themes were identified: (1) Reluctance to acknowledge specific needs among immigrant women; (2) Striving to provide contraceptive counselling to immigrant women; (3) Organizational barriers hindering patient-centred abortion care to immigrant women CONCLUSIONS: Health care providers' experiences of the specific needs among non-European, immigrant women are not openly discussed, although they are acknowledged. To achieve equitable access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH), health care providers need to be better equipped when encountering immigrant women in abortion care, especially regarding contraceptive counselling. The potential impact of patients' knowledge, norms and values is not adequately dealt with in the clinical encounter. Moreover, to provide patient-centred care, it is crucial to understand how to develop and implement SRH care that ensures equal access to high-quality care.
PubMed ID
27938866 View in PubMed
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[Evaluation of attitude towards euthanasia expressed by first year medical students from Szczecin, Greifswald and Lund medical faculties]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90539
Source
Ann Acad Med Stetin. 2008;54(1):164-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Mierzecki Artur
Rekawek Krzysztof
Swiatkowski Jan
Hoelscher Mave
Yelva Lilia
Wisniewska Magdalena
Boczar Tomasz
Chojnicki Michal
Montnémery Peter
Hannich Hans-Joachim
Author Affiliation
Samodzielna Pracownia Ksztalcenia Lekarza Rodzinnego Pomorskiej Akademii Medycznej w Szczecinie ul. Rybacka 1, 70-204 Szczecin.
Source
Ann Acad Med Stetin. 2008;54(1):164-9
Date
2008
Language
Polish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Euthanasia
Euthanasia, Active
Female
Germany
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Support Care
Male
Poland
Questionnaires
Religion and Medicine
Right to Die
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Medical students' attitude towards euthanasia is a very important ethical problem because they may grapple with this question as future doctors. The aim of the study was to compare the attitude to euthanasia in the group of first year medical students from Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Greifswald (Germany) and Lund University (Sweden). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study is based on anonymous filling out of the questionnaire about euthanasia by first year medical students. 233 students (61%) answered the questionnaire. There were 65 Polish students, 71 German and 97 Swedish ones. In the group of respondents there were 129 (55%) women and 104 (45%) men. The average age was 22.3 years. RESULTS: 82% of questioned German students declared the acceptance of euthanasia and it was a significantly higher percentage than in comparison to 61% of Swedish students (p
PubMed ID
19127825 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.