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Advantages of breastfeeding according to Turkish mother's living in Istanbul and Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60075
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1988;27(4):405-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
T. Koctürk
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Karolinska Institute, St Göran's Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1988;27(4):405-10
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Feeding
Contraception
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Parity
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
As part of a cross-sectional study, carried out among Turkish mother-infant pairs, the mothers of 269 infants living in Istanbul and 30 living in Stockholm were asked their opinions as to the advantages and/or disadvantages of breastfeeding. The answers were categorized according to the attributes mentioned, quantified and related to the socio-economic status of the area of residence, maternal education, origin, current infant feeding practice and contraceptive method. In Istanbul, 63% of the responses stressed some advantage and 31% some disadvantage of breastfeeding. The contraceptive effect was considered the major advantage and the possibility of milk insufficiency the major disadvantage. In Stockholm, the nutritional value of breastfeeding was considered the most important advantage. No disadvantage was mentioned in Stockholm, despite the fact that breastfeeding durations among the immigrant group was shorter than that of the group in Istanbul. The implications of the responses are analyzed. It is hypothesized that mother-centered advantages, such as the birth-spacing effect of breastfeeding, may be more important motivators for continuing breastfeeding among women living under less-advantaged social conditions, and that, if this is true for some groups of mothers, the infant-centered emphasis in the breastfeeding promotional messages may need modification to include the interests of the mothers, as well.
PubMed ID
3262926 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use beliefs and behaviors among high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203376
Source
J Adolesc Health. 1999 Jan;24(1):48-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
L. Feldman
B. Harvey
P. Holowaty
L. Shortt
Author Affiliation
East York Health Unit, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 1999 Jan;24(1):48-58
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Life Style - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Parents
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To identify specific alcohol use beliefs and behaviors among local high school students; to determine whether relationships exist between alcohol use and various sociodemographic and lifestyle behaviors; and to assist in the development and implementation of alcohol abuse prevention programs.
This cross-sectional study involved the completion of a questionnaire by 1236 Grade 9-13 students (86% response rate) from 62 randomly selected classrooms in three Canadian urban schools. Data analyzed here are part of a larger lifestyle survey.
A total of 24% of students reported never having tasted alcohol, 22% have tasted alcohol but do not currently drink, 39% are current moderate drinkers, 11% are current heavy drinkers (five or more drinks on one occasion at least once a month), and 5% did not answer. Reasons stated most often for not drinking were "bad for health" and "upbringing," while reasons stated most often for drinking were "enjoy it" and "to get in a party mood." Student drinking patterns were significantly related to gender, ethnicity, grade, and the reported drinking habits of parents and friends. Older male adolescents who describe their ethnicity as Canadian are at higher risk for heavy drinking than students who are younger or female, or identify their ethnicity as European or Asian. Current heavy drinkers are at higher risk than other students for engaging in other high-risk behaviors such as drinking and driving, being a passenger in a car when the driver is intoxicated, and daily smoking.
Heavy alcohol use in adolescents remains an important community health concern. Older self-described Canadian and Canadian-born male adolescents are at higher risk for heavy drinking. Current and heavy drinking rises significantly between Grades 9 and 12. Students who drink heavily are more likely to drink and drive, to smoke daily, and to have friends and parents who drink alcohol.
PubMed ID
9890365 View in PubMed
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An examination of stress among Aboriginal women and men with diabetes in Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179442
Source
Ethn Health. 2004 May;9(2):189-212
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Yoshi Iwasaki
Judith Bartlett
John O'Neil
Author Affiliation
Health, Leisure and Human Performance Research Institute, 102 Frank Kennedy Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Mannitoba, Canada. iwasakiy@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
Ethn Health. 2004 May;9(2):189-212
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Diabetes Mellitus - economics - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Female
Health Expenditures
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Poverty
Self Care - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - etiology
Abstract
In this study, a series of focus groups were conducted to gain an understanding of the nature of stress among Canadian Aboriginal women and men living with diabetes. Specifically, attention was given to the meanings Aboriginal peoples with diabetes attach to their lived experiences of stress, and the major sources or causes of stress in their lives. The key common themes identified are concerned not only with health-related issues (i.e. physical stress of managing diabetes, psychological stress of managing diabetes, fears about the future, suffering the complications of diabetes, and financial aspects of living with diabetes), but also with marginal economic conditions (e.g. poverty, unemployment); trauma and violence (e.g. abuse, murder, suicide, missing children, bereavement); and cultural, historical, and political aspects linked to the identity of being Aboriginal (e.g. 'deep-rooted racism', identity problems). These themes are, in fact, acknowledged not as mutually exclusive, but as intertwined. Furthermore, the findings suggest that it is important to give attention to diversity in the Aboriginal population. Specifically, Métis-specific stressors, as well as female-specific stressors, were identified. An understanding of stress experienced by Aboriginal women and men with diabetes has important implications for policy and programme planning to help eliminate or reduce at-risk stress factors, prevent stress-related illnesses, and enhance their health and life quality.
PubMed ID
15223576 View in PubMed
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Background, offence characteristics, and criminal outcomes of Aboriginal youth who sexually offend: a closer look at Aboriginal youth intervention needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161877
Source
Sex Abuse. 2007 Sep;19(3):257-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Erika Y Rojas
Heather M Gretton
Author Affiliation
Youth Forensic Psychiatric Services, Suite 100-3705 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby, BC, Canada, V5G 3H3. e.rojas@usask.ca
Source
Sex Abuse. 2007 Sep;19(3):257-83
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Juvenile Delinquency - ethnology
Male
Risk assessment
Sex Offenses - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Canada's Aboriginal peoples face a number of social and health issues. Research shows that Aboriginal youths are over-represented in the criminal justice system and youth forensic psychiatric programmes. Within the literature on sex offending youth, there appears to be no published data available to inform clinicians working with adjudicated Aboriginal youth. Therefore, the present study examines the background, offence characteristics, and criminal outcomes of Aboriginal (n = 102) and non-Aboriginal (n = 257) youths who engaged in sexual offending behaviour and were ordered to attend a sexual offender treatment programme in British Columbia between 1985 and 2004. Overall, Aboriginal youths were more likely than non-Aboriginal youths to have background histories of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), substance abuse, childhood victimization, academic difficulties, and instability in the living environment. Both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youths had a tendency to target children under 12-years-old, females, and non-strangers. Aboriginal youths were more likely than non-Aboriginal youths to use substances at the time of their sexual index offence. Outcome data revealed that Aboriginal youths were more likely than their non-Aboriginal counterparts to recidivate sexually, violently, and non-violently during the 10-year follow-up period. Furthermore, the time between discharge and commission of all types of re-offences was significantly shorter for Aboriginal youths than for non-Aboriginal youths. Implications of these findings are discussed with regards to the needs of Aboriginal youth and intervention.
PubMed ID
17701354 View in PubMed
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Being a woman: perspectives of low-german-speaking mennonite women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152302
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Apr;30(4):324-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Judith C Kulig
Ruth Babcock
Margaret Wall
Shirley Hill
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. Kulig@uleth.ca
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Apr;30(4):324-38
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Christianity
Contraception Behavior - ethnology
Cultural Competency
Female
Germany - ethnology
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
Understanding the beliefs and knowledge related to women's sexuality is important when working with unique religious groups in order to provide culturally appropriate care. An exploratory, descriptive qualitative study generated knowledge, beliefs, and practices related to menstruation, ovulation, and family planning among Low German-speaking (LGS) Mennonite women (n = 38). There is a pervasive silence that surrounds sexuality among this group, who have a limited understanding of the physiological changes they experience. Honoring religious principles and family and community expectations through acceptable female behavior is essential. Adherence to religious principles varies by family but is not shared with the group to avoid disfavor.
PubMed ID
19255886 View in PubMed
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Breast and cervical cancer screening practices among American Indian and Alaska Native women in the United States, 1992-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3988
Source
Prev Med. 1999 Oct;29(4):287-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
S S Coughlin
R J Uhler
D K Blackman
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341, USA. SIC9@CDC.Gov
Source
Prev Med. 1999 Oct;29(4):287-95
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis
Educational Status
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that American Indian and Alaska Native women have important barriers to cancer screening and underuse cancer screening tests. METHODS: We examined the breast and cervical cancer screening practices of 4,961 American Indian and Alaska Native women in 47 states from 1992 through 1997 by using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. RESULTS: About 65.1% [95% confidence interval (CI) 60.2 to 69.9%] of women in this sample aged 50 years or older had received a mammogram in the past 2 years. About 82.6% (95% CI 80.1 to 85.2%) of women aged 18 years or older who had not undergone a hysterectomy had received a Papanicolaou test in the past 3 years. Older women and those with less education were less likely to be screened. Women who had seen a physician in the past year were much more likely to have been screened. CONCLUSIONS: These results underscore the need for continued efforts to ensure that American Indian and Alaska Native women who are elderly or medically underserved have access to cancer screening services.
Notes
Erratum In: Prev Med 2000 Apr;30(4):348-52
PubMed ID
10547054 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening practices and correlates among American Indian and Alaska native women in California, 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97787
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2010 Mar-Apr;20(2):139-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan M Eberth
John Charles Huber
Antonio Rene
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, Houston, TX 77098, USA. Jan.M.Eberth@uth.tmc.edu
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2010 Mar-Apr;20(2):139-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology
California - epidemiology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Mammography
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Breast cancer incidence and mortality have been increasing among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women, and their survival rate is the lowest of all racial/ethnic groups. Nevertheless, knowledge of AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices and their correlates is limited. METHODS: Using the 2003 California Health Interview Survey, we 1) compared the breast cancer screening practices of AI/AN women to other groups and 2) explored the association of several factors known or thought to influence AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices. FINDINGS: Compared with other races, AI/AN women had the lowest rate of mammogram screening (ever and within the past 2 years). For clinical breast examination receipt, Asian women had the lowest rate, followed by AI/AN women. Factors associated with AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices included older age, having a high school diploma or some college education, receipt of a Pap test within the past 3 years, and having visited a doctor within the past year. CONCLUSION: Significant differences in breast cancer screening practices were noted between races, with AI/AN women often having significantly lower rates. Integrating these epidemiologic findings into effective policy and practice requires additional applied research initiatives.
PubMed ID
20211430 View in PubMed
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Chinese immigrants' management of their cardiovascular disease risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163328
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2007 Nov;29(7):804-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Kathryn M King
Pamela LeBlanc
William Carr
Hude Quan
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Canada. kingk@ucalgary.ca
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2007 Nov;29(7):804-26
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - education - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
China - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Care - methods - psychology
Sex Factors
Social Identification
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The authors have undertaken a series of grounded theory studies to describe and explain how ethnocultural affiliation and gender influence the process that cardiac patients undergo when faced with making behavior changes associated with reducing their cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Data were collected through audiorecorded semistructured interviews (using an interpreter as necessary), and the authors analyzed the data using constant comparative methods. The core variable that emerged through the series of studies was "meeting the challenge." Here, the authors describe the findings from a sample of Chinese immigrants (10 men, 5 women) to Canada. The process of managing CVD risk for the Chinese immigrants was characterized by their extraordinary diligence in seeking multiple sources of information to enable them to manage their health.
PubMed ID
17526869 View in PubMed
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Cut-point shift and index shift in self-reported health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177300
Source
J Health Econ. 2004 Nov;23(6):1083-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Maarten Lindeboom
Eddy van Doorslaer
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Tinbergen Institute Amsterdam, Free University of Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1005, Amsterdam 1081 HV, The Netherlands. mlindeboom@feweb.vu.nl
Source
J Health Econ. 2004 Nov;23(6):1083-99
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Culture
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Psychometrics
Self-Assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
There is some concern that ordered responses on health questions may differ across populations or even across subgroups of a population. This reporting heterogeneity may invalidate group comparisons and measures of health inequality. This paper proposes a test for differential reporting in ordered response models which enables to distinguish between cut-point shift and index shift. The method is illustrated using Canadian National Population Health Survey data. The McMaster Health Utility Index Mark 3 (HUI3) is used as a more objective health measure than the simple five-point scale of self-assessed health. We find clear evidence of index shifting and cut-point shifting for age and gender, but not for income, education or language.
PubMed ID
15556237 View in PubMed
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Dental anxiety in Danish and Chinese adults--a cross-cultural perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52784
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):123-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
E. Schwarz
H. Birn
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Public Health, University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Dentistry.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):123-30
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark - ethnology
Dental Anxiety - ethnology
Female
Health Behavior
Hong Kong
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to correlate dental anxiety as reported by two different ethnic groups with socio-demographic factors, dental status, and dental behaviour. Two randomly selected populations aged 35-44 years and 65-74 years were interviewed. The populations comprised 214 and 99 Danes and 384 and 497 Hong Kong Chinese respectively. Dental anxiety was assessed by the Corah Dental Anxiety Score (DAS). Mean DAS scores were significantly higher in Chinese than in Danes (8.7-10.3 and 6.7-8.2, respectively) and higher in the younger than in the older groups. Moderate to phobic dental anxiety was reported by 15% of the Danes and 30% of the Chinese, the latter proportion far beyond what is usually reported in Western populations. Only in the Chinese group did women report more anxiety than men. Regression analysis indicated that only a few of the variables selected to explain anxiety determinants had significant explanatory value. Among Chinese, gender was the most predominant in both age groups followed by perceived condition of teeth in the younger age group. Among Danes, perceived condition of teeth had an explanatory value for both age groups and dental visit pattern was the strongest for the younger age group. In spite of statistical significance, all explanatory values were small and indicate that variables not included in this analysis may exert a greater influence on the variation in dental anxiety. DAS, seemingly, was able to highlight variations in dental anxiety in the populations in spite of their differences and made interpretations feasible with regard to contrasting dental care behaviour and dental status.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7667665 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.