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Acute pain and use of local anesthesia: tooth drilling and childbirth labor pain beliefs among Anglo-Americans, Chinese, and Scandinavians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52621
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Moore
I. Brødsgaard
T K Mao
M L Miller
S F Dworkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-6370, USA. roding@u.washington.edu
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia, Local - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Dental Cavity Preparation
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Taiwan
United States
Abstract
Differences in ethnic beliefs about the perceived need for local anesthesia for tooth drilling and childbirth labor were surveyed among Anglo-Americans, Mandarin Chinese, and Scandinavians (89 dentists and 251 patients) matched for age, gender, and occupation. Subjects matched survey questionnaire items selected from previously reported interview results to estimate (a) their beliefs about the possible use of anesthetic for tooth drilling and labor pain compared with other possible remedies and (b) the choice of pain descriptors associated with the use of nonuse of anesthetic, including descriptions of injection pain. Multidimensional scaling, Gamma, and Chi-square statistics as well as odds ratios and Spearman's correlations were employed in the analysis. Seventy-seven percent of American informants reported the use of anesthetics as possible remedies for drilling and 51% reported the use of anesthetics for labor pain compared with 34% that reported the use of anesthetics among Chinese for drilling and 5% for labor pain and 70% among Scandinavians for drilling and 35% for labor pain. Most Americans and Swedes described tooth-drilling sensations as sharp, most Chinese used descriptors such as sharp and "sourish" (suan), and most Danes used words like shooting (jagende). By rank, Americans described labor pain as cramping, sharp, and excruciating, Chinese used words like sharp, intermittent, and horrible, Danes used words like shooting, tiring, and sharp, and Swedes used words like tiring, "good," yet horrible. Preferred pain descriptors for drilling, birth, and injection pains varied significantly by ethnicity. Results corroborated conclusions of a qualitative study about pain beliefs in relation to perceived needs for anesthetic in tooth drilling. Samples used to obtain the results were estimated to approach qualitative representativity for these urban ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
9790007 View in PubMed
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American and Icelandic parents' perceptions of the health status of their young children with chronic asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15207
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Erla Kolbrun Svavarsdóttir
Mary Kay Rayens
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Faculty of Nursing, Eirbergi, Eiriksgata 34, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. eks@hi.is
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Asthma - prevention & control
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Welfare
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Cost of Illness
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Iceland
Male
Midwestern United States
Models, Psychological
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Workload
Abstract
PURPOSE: To identify factors that influence American and Icelandic parents' health perceptions among families of infants or young children with asthma. DESIGN: A cross-sectional research design of 76 American families and 103 Icelandic families. Data were collected mainly in the Midwest of the United States (US) and in Iceland from August 1996 through January 2000. METHOD: Parents in these two countries who had children aged 6 or younger with chronic asthma completed questionnaires regarding family demands, caregiving demands, family hardiness, sense of coherence, and health perceptions. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and t tests were compiled. Multiple regression analysis was used to test path models and for mediation. FINDINGS: American parents differed from their Icelandic counterparts in family hardiness. In both countries, significant differences were found in caregiving demands and health perceptions between mothers and fathers. Illness severity and caregiving demands affected health perceptions of both mothers and fathers. Sense of coherence mediated the relationship between family demands and parents' perceptions for both parents. For mothers only, family hardiness mediated the relationship between family demands and health perceptions. CONCLUSIONS: The Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation was useful for building knowledge on parents' health perceptions in two Western cultures for families of young children with asthma. Interventions emphasizing family and individual resiliency and strengths have the potential to affect parents' views of their children's health.
PubMed ID
14735678 View in PubMed
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An international comparative multicenter study of assessment of dental appearance using computer-aided image manipulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33734
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
G E Carlsson
I V Wagner
P. Odman
K. Ekstrand
M. MacEntee
C. Marinello
T. Nanami
R K Ow
H. Sato
C. Speer
J R Strub
T. Watanabe
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Göteborg University, Sweden. g_carlsson@odontologi.gu.se
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dental Technicians - psychology
Dentists - psychology
Esthetics, Dental - psychology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of the present investigation was to perform an international multicenter comparison of dental appearance as evaluated by dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants were drawn from three groups: 203 dentists, 197 dental technicians and 254 nondental subjects. The methods developed in a previous study in Sweden were applied again in seven centers located in six countries. A questionnaire, accompanied by five sets of computer-manipulated images portraying one man and one woman, was used to prompt and record responses to different aspects of dental appearance and function. RESULTS: The questionnaire revealed that both the dental appearance and function of teeth were important to most of the participants, but three quarters of the participants did indicate that good dental function was more important that esthetics. More women (30%) than men (18%), however, placed greater importance on appearance. Age or gender did not influence judgments of the computer-manipulated images, although judgments did vary greatly within the three groups and between the centers. Nonetheless, highly colored teeth were preferred more often by nondental subjects than by dentists or dental technicians. CONCLUSION: Computer-aided image manipulation shows promise as a method for investigating the significance of dental-related beliefs, especially those relating to esthetics, in different population groups. The evaluation of dental appearance and function in this study indicated that dental function is held in greater regard, and that the significance of dental appearance varies widely among dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects.
PubMed ID
9728119 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to compliance with tuberculosis treatment among women and men in Vietnam.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52539
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Oct;3(10):862-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
E. Johansson
N H Long
V K Diwan
A. Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.johansson@phs.ki.se
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Oct;3(10):862-8
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Comparative Study
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Focus Groups - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology - psychology
Prejudice
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - drug therapy - economics - ethnology - psychology
Vietnam - epidemiology
Abstract
SETTING: A study carried out in 1996 in four districts representing south and north as well as urban and rural areas of Vietnam. OBJECTIVE: To explore gender differences in knowledge, beliefs and attitudes towards tuberculosis and its treatment, and how these factors influence patients' compliance with treatment. DESIGN: Sixteen focus group discussions were performed by a multi-disciplinary research team from Vietnam and Sweden. Analysis was performed using modified Grounded Theory technique, specifically evaluating gender differences. RESULTS: Women were believed to be more compliant than men. Insufficient knowledge and individual cost during treatment were reported as main obstacles to compliance among men (poor patient compliance), while sensitivity to interaction with health staff and stigma in society (poor health staff and system compliance) were reported as the main obstacles among women. CONCLUSIONS: It is time to adopt a more comprehensive and gender-sensitive approach to compliance, which incorporates patient compliance, doctor compliance and system compliance, in order to fully support individual patients in their efforts to comply with treatment.
PubMed ID
10524582 View in PubMed
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Being different and vulnerable: experiences of immigrant African women who have been circumcised and sought maternity care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63115
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Vanja Berggren
Staffan Bergström
Anna-Karin Edberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):50-7
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa, Eastern - ethnology
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Circumcision, Female - ethnology - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Maternal Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Professional-Patient Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to explore the encounters with the health care system in Sweden of women from Somalia, Eritrea, and Sudan who have been genitally cut. A qualitative study was performed through interviews with 22 women originally from Somalia, Sudan, and Eritrea who were living in Sweden. The women experienced being different and vulnerable, suffering from being abandoned and mutilated, and they felt exposed in the encounter with the Swedish health care personnel and tried to adapt to a new cultural context. The results of this study indicate a need for more individualized, culturally adjusted care and support and a need for systematic education about female genital cutting for Swedish health care workers.
PubMed ID
16410436 View in PubMed
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Can the Gail model be useful in American Indian and Alaska Native populations?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3904
Source
Cancer. 2004 Mar 1;100(5):906-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2004
Author
Judith Salmon Kaur
Marilyn A Roubidoux
Jeff Sloan
Paul Novotny
Author Affiliation
College of Medicine, The Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. kaur.judith@mayo.edu
Source
Cancer. 2004 Mar 1;100(5):906-12
Date
Mar-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Arizona - epidemiology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening - standards - trends
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Rural Population
South Dakota - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Very little is known about breast carcinoma risk factors for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women undergoing screening. The Gail model has been a useful tool for predicting the risk of breast carcinoma in several populations. It has not been applied systematically to AI/AN women. METHODS: The current study was a retrospective review of 1458 screening mammograms performed for AI/AN women. The authors applied the Gail model to estimate both absolute risk and relative risk for breast carcinoma for AI/AN women screened in South Dakota, Arizona, and Alaska. RESULTS: The mean age of the women was 52.4 years. The onset of menses was not significantly different than expected. The average age at first birth was 20 years, very few women were nulliparous, and few women were age > 30 years at first live birth. The proportion of women reporting a first- or second-degree relative with breast carcinoma was similar to the proportion in the general population. The results of the model indicated an overall average relative risk that ranged from 1.42 to 2.69 compared with white American women, depending on the model assumptions used. Using a modified Gail model and calculating an imputed absolute risk, the expected incidence of breast carcinoma in this population increased to rates of 170-180 per 100,000 in the next 10 years, a significant increase over the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-derived incidence rates from 1988 to 1992 of 31.6 per 100,000 for AI women in New Mexico and 78.9 per 100,000 for AN women. CONCLUSIONS: The model indicated a likelihood of increasing rates of breast carcinoma in the study population. The data obtained were useful in generating preliminary estimates of breast carcinoma risk in the study population, for which no prospective population survey has been completed. The inherent weaknesses in the current retrospective study indicated the need for a large-scale prospective data collection to confirm these exploratory findings.
PubMed ID
14983484 View in PubMed
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Clinical factors, psycho-social stressors and sick-leave patterns in a group of Swedish and Greek patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73755
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1990 Jun;18(2):133-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
M. Löfvander
D. Papastavrou
Author Affiliation
Rinkeby Health Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1990 Jun;18(2):133-8
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Greece - ethnology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - ethnology - psychology - rehabilitation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - ethnology - rehabilitation
Sweden - epidemiology
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
To assess patterns of illness behaviour in immigrant Greeks, 50 Greek and 50 Swedish consecutive patients were examined by a Swedish general practitioner and a Greek psychotherapist at a primary health centre in Stockholm. In addition to a physical examination an overall psychiatric assessment of the patients was made, partly with the help of rating scales. Psycho-social stressors were also rated. In spite of modest somatic and psychiatric findings, the majority of the Greek patients had been on long-term sick-leave and none of them could be rehabilitated. This illness behaviour, with passivity as the most notable response to pain, was very evident in the Greek group and was assessed as being strongly related to psycho-social stressors as well as to iatrogenic damage. All of the patients whose sick-leave had been of short duration prior to their first visit to the health centre could be rehabilitated. Psycho-social counselling given to the Greek patients in their native tongue had only marginal effect.
PubMed ID
2367823 View in PubMed
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Cultural and social acceptability of a healthy diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54991
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993 Aug;47(8):592-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
L. Holm
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993 Aug;47(8):592-9
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects - economics - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Life Style
Male
Nutrition - education
Nutritional Requirements
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Satiation
Social Values
Abstract
The extent to which the dietary practices recommended by nutrition science are compatible with an enjoyable lifestyle is a recurring theme in the debate on food and health in Denmark. The aim of this study was to see in practice what problems arise when ordinary people are confronted with a healthy diet. Fourteen of the participants in an 8 month dietary intervention study were interviewed about their opinions of, and experiences with, a diet composed in accordance with the Nordic nutrition recommendations. The interviews were qualitative, in depth and semistructured. The participants were interviewed twice, the first time towards the end of the intervention and again 3 months after the intervention ended. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. For the participants, who were young students with a relatively high knowledge of nutrition, practical experience of a recommended diet was a series of surprises: the amount of food, its similarity to modern Danish food culture, its palatability, and the relatively small amount of dairy products in the diet were contrary to participants expectations. Participants found the recommended diet pleasant to live on, but expected certain economical and practical difficulties in applying it to everyday life outside the intervention. Hunger and satiety sensations changed and became more distinct. The results of the study indicate suggestions relevant for both industrial product development and nutrition information to the public.
PubMed ID
8404795 View in PubMed
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Cultural challenges in end-of-life care: reflections from focus groups' interviews with hospice staff in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72205
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Mar;31(3):623-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
S. Ekblad
A. Marttila
M. Emilsson
Author Affiliation
Unit for Immigrant Environment and Health, National Swedish Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden. solvig.ekblad@ipm.ki.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Mar;31(3):623-30
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospice Care - psychology
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Cultural challenges in end-of-life care: reflections from focus groups' interviews with hospice staff in Stockholm During the past few decades, Swedish society has changed from a society with a few ethnic groups to one with over a hundred groups of different ethnic backgrounds, languages and religions. As society is becoming increasingly multicultural, cultural issues are also becoming an important feature in health care, particularly in end-of-life care where the questions of existential nature are of great importance. However, cultural issues in health care, especially at hospices, have not been studied sufficiently in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to gather reflections about cultural issues among hospice staff after a 3-day seminar in multicultural end-of-life care, by using a qualitative focus groups method. The 19 participants (majority nurses) were divided into three groups, one per hospice unit. A discussion guide was developed with the following themes: 1) post-training experiences of working with patients with multicultural background; 2) experiences gained by participating in the course of multicultural end-of-life care; 3) post-training reflections about one's own culture; 4) ideas or thoughts regarding work with patients from other cultures arising from the training; and 5) the need for further training in multicultural end-of-life care. One of the study's main findings was that to better understand other cultures it is important to raise awareness about the staff's own culture and to pay attention to culture especially in the context of the individual. The findings from focus groups provide insight regarding the need for planning flexible training in cultural issues to match the needs of the staff at the hospice units studied.
PubMed ID
10718882 View in PubMed
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Dental anxiety in Danish and Chinese adults--a cross-cultural perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52784
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):123-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
E. Schwarz
H. Birn
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Public Health, University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Dentistry.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):123-30
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark - ethnology
Dental Anxiety - ethnology
Female
Health Behavior
Hong Kong
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to correlate dental anxiety as reported by two different ethnic groups with socio-demographic factors, dental status, and dental behaviour. Two randomly selected populations aged 35-44 years and 65-74 years were interviewed. The populations comprised 214 and 99 Danes and 384 and 497 Hong Kong Chinese respectively. Dental anxiety was assessed by the Corah Dental Anxiety Score (DAS). Mean DAS scores were significantly higher in Chinese than in Danes (8.7-10.3 and 6.7-8.2, respectively) and higher in the younger than in the older groups. Moderate to phobic dental anxiety was reported by 15% of the Danes and 30% of the Chinese, the latter proportion far beyond what is usually reported in Western populations. Only in the Chinese group did women report more anxiety than men. Regression analysis indicated that only a few of the variables selected to explain anxiety determinants had significant explanatory value. Among Chinese, gender was the most predominant in both age groups followed by perceived condition of teeth in the younger age group. Among Danes, perceived condition of teeth had an explanatory value for both age groups and dental visit pattern was the strongest for the younger age group. In spite of statistical significance, all explanatory values were small and indicate that variables not included in this analysis may exert a greater influence on the variation in dental anxiety. DAS, seemingly, was able to highlight variations in dental anxiety in the populations in spite of their differences and made interpretations feasible with regard to contrasting dental care behaviour and dental status.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7667665 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.