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Attitudes to compliance with tuberculosis treatment among women and men in Vietnam.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52539
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Oct;3(10):862-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
E. Johansson
N H Long
V K Diwan
A. Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.johansson@phs.ki.se
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Oct;3(10):862-8
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Comparative Study
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Focus Groups - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology - psychology
Prejudice
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - drug therapy - economics - ethnology - psychology
Vietnam - epidemiology
Abstract
SETTING: A study carried out in 1996 in four districts representing south and north as well as urban and rural areas of Vietnam. OBJECTIVE: To explore gender differences in knowledge, beliefs and attitudes towards tuberculosis and its treatment, and how these factors influence patients' compliance with treatment. DESIGN: Sixteen focus group discussions were performed by a multi-disciplinary research team from Vietnam and Sweden. Analysis was performed using modified Grounded Theory technique, specifically evaluating gender differences. RESULTS: Women were believed to be more compliant than men. Insufficient knowledge and individual cost during treatment were reported as main obstacles to compliance among men (poor patient compliance), while sensitivity to interaction with health staff and stigma in society (poor health staff and system compliance) were reported as the main obstacles among women. CONCLUSIONS: It is time to adopt a more comprehensive and gender-sensitive approach to compliance, which incorporates patient compliance, doctor compliance and system compliance, in order to fully support individual patients in their efforts to comply with treatment.
PubMed ID
10524582 View in PubMed
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Barriers to providing effective mental health services to American Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191397
Source
Ment Health Serv Res. 2001 Dec;3(4):215-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
J L Johnson
M C Cameron
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University at Buffalo, New York 14260-1050, USA. jj44@acsu.buffalo.edu
Source
Ment Health Serv Res. 2001 Dec;3(4):215-23
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Prejudice
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Like most indigenous populations throughout the world who have undergone innumerable cultural changes, the mental health care needs of American Indians are great. Some surveys conducted by the Indian Health Service show high rates of suicide, mortality, depression and substance abuse. Little is known about effective mental health care among American Indians due, in part, to the lack of culturally appropriate models of mental health in American Indians. This article presents a cultural framework in order to understand the mental health care needs of American Indians and discusses barriers to providing effective mental health services to American Indians.
PubMed ID
11859967 View in PubMed
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Colonialization: a health determinant for pregnant Dogrib women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63333
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Oct;15(4):323-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Pertice M Moffitt
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Oct;15(4):323-30
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Colonialism
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Maternal Health Services - organization & administration
Midwifery - organization & administration
Northwest Territories
Power (Psychology)
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - ethnology
Prejudice
Social Control, Formal - methods
Stereotyping
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
Childbirth for many Aboriginal women living in remote communities of the Northwest Territories, Canada, includes separation from their family and community for weeks at a time. This colonialization of childbirth, enforced for decades, is true for Dogrib Dene. Colonialization produces serious social consequences on the everyday lives of pregnant Aboriginal women, which results in lower health outcomes. This article provides a literature review of colonialization in Canada's far north establishing the position that colonialization is a determinant of health. The purpose of this article is to generate knowledge that will inform health professionals and ultimately reduce health disparities as experienced and evident among Dogrib women. By highlighting the concept of colonialization and establishing this concept as a determinant of health, nurses and midwives will identify disparities created through stressors of power and control. From there, culturally meaningful health promotion strategies will be developed and implemented within their nursing practice.
PubMed ID
15359066 View in PubMed
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Construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older in the north of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87255
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Feb;17(4):451-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Aléx Lena
Hammarström Anne
Norberg Astrid
Lundman Berit
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.alex@nurs.umu.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Feb;17(4):451-9
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Family - ethnology
Friends - psychology
Gender Identity
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Men - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Personal Satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Concept
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Behavior
Social Values
Sweden
Work - psychology
Abstract
AIM: The aim was to analyse the construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older. BACKGROUND: All societies have a gender order, constructed from multiple ideas of what is seen as feminine and masculine. As the group of men aged 85 and older is increasing in size and their demand for care will increase, we must recognize the importance of studying these men and various discourses of masculinities. DESIGN: Qualitative explorative. METHODS: Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse thematic narratives. Masculinity theories provided the point of departure for the analysis. RESULTS: The analysis coalesced into three masculinities. 'Being in the male centre', developed from subthemes as: taking pride in one's work and economic situation; being in the centre in relation to others; regarding women as sexual objects; and belonging to a select group. 'Striving to maintain the male facade' developed from subthemes as: emphasizing 'important' connections; having feelings of loss; striving to maintain old norms and rejecting the fact of being old. 'Being related' was formulated from subthemes as: feeling at home with domestic duties; being concerned; accepting one's own aging; and reflecting on life. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates the importance of being aware of the existence of multiple masculinities, in contrast to the generally unproblematic and unsubtle particular healthcare approaches which consider men as simply belonging to one masculinity. Relevance to clinical practice. Diverse masculinities probably affect encounters between men and healthcare providers and others who work with an older population and therefore our results are of importance in a caring context.
PubMed ID
18205678 View in PubMed
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Cultural challenges in end-of-life care: reflections from focus groups' interviews with hospice staff in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72205
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Mar;31(3):623-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
S. Ekblad
A. Marttila
M. Emilsson
Author Affiliation
Unit for Immigrant Environment and Health, National Swedish Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden. solvig.ekblad@ipm.ki.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Mar;31(3):623-30
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospice Care - psychology
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Cultural challenges in end-of-life care: reflections from focus groups' interviews with hospice staff in Stockholm During the past few decades, Swedish society has changed from a society with a few ethnic groups to one with over a hundred groups of different ethnic backgrounds, languages and religions. As society is becoming increasingly multicultural, cultural issues are also becoming an important feature in health care, particularly in end-of-life care where the questions of existential nature are of great importance. However, cultural issues in health care, especially at hospices, have not been studied sufficiently in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to gather reflections about cultural issues among hospice staff after a 3-day seminar in multicultural end-of-life care, by using a qualitative focus groups method. The 19 participants (majority nurses) were divided into three groups, one per hospice unit. A discussion guide was developed with the following themes: 1) post-training experiences of working with patients with multicultural background; 2) experiences gained by participating in the course of multicultural end-of-life care; 3) post-training reflections about one's own culture; 4) ideas or thoughts regarding work with patients from other cultures arising from the training; and 5) the need for further training in multicultural end-of-life care. One of the study's main findings was that to better understand other cultures it is important to raise awareness about the staff's own culture and to pay attention to culture especially in the context of the individual. The findings from focus groups provide insight regarding the need for planning flexible training in cultural issues to match the needs of the staff at the hospice units studied.
PubMed ID
10718882 View in PubMed
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Determinants of Black women's health in rural and remote communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160555
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2007 Sep;39(3):56-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Josephine Etowa
Juliana Wiens
Wanda Thomas Bernard
Barbara Clow
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Josephine.Etowa@dal.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2007 Sep;39(3):56-76
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
African Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medically underserved area
Nova Scotia
Nursing Methodology Research
Poverty
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Social Distance
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Women - psychology
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
The On the Margins project investigated health status, health-care delivery, and use of health services among African-Canadian women residing in rural and remote regions of the province of Nova Scotia. A participatory action research approach provided a framework for the study. Triangulation of data-collection methods--interviews, focus groups, and questionnaires--formed the basis of data generation. A total of 237 in-depth one-on-one interviews were conducted and coded verbatim. Atlas-ti data-management software was used to facilitate coding and analysis. Six themes emerged from the data: Black women's multiple roles, perceptions of health, experiences with the health-care system, factors affecting health, strategies for managing health, and envisioning solutions. The authors focus on 1 of these themes, factors affecting Black women's health, and discuss 3 subthemes: race and racism, poverty and unemployment, and access to health care.
PubMed ID
17970460 View in PubMed
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Doing participatory action research in a racist world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168374
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2006 Aug;28(5):525-40; discussion 561-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Colleen Varcoe
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2006 Aug;28(5):525-40; discussion 561-3
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Battered Women - psychology
British Columbia
Consumer Participation - methods - psychology
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Nursing Methodology Research - organization & administration
Power (Psychology)
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Research Design
Research Personnel - psychology
Researcher-Subject Relations - psychology
Semantics
Social Dominance
Social Identification
Spouse Abuse - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
This exploration of the racial power dynamics in a participatory action research project with women who had experienced intimate partner violence discusses the challenges inherent in doing participatory action with antiracist intent and offers suggestions for overcoming these challenges. To engage in this type of research, explicit commitment to the goals of an antiracist intent needs to be shared as widely as possible. Fostering such shared commitment demands that the social locations of all involved be interrogated continuously. Such interrogation, however, needs to be prefaced with understanding that individuals are not representative of particular power positions or social identities or locations and with critical attention to how language and social structures shape racism and other forms of dominance. Being inclusive must be understood as complex and the influence of diverse agendas and perspectives acknowledged and taken into account. In the face of such complexity, "success" in research may need redefinition.
PubMed ID
16829636 View in PubMed
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Enhancing research with migrant women through focus groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172919
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2005 Oct;27(6):735-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Luciana Ruppenthal
Jodi Tuck
Anita J Gagnon
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University.
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2005 Oct;27(6):735-54
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Communication Barriers
Cultural Diversity
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Focus Groups - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires - standards
Refugees - psychology
Reproductive Medicine
Researcher-Subject Relations
Trust
Women - education - psychology
Women's health
Abstract
Recent systematic reviews of measurement strategies have identified a striking lack of data to support the validity of most questionnaires used with multiethnic, migrant populations. In the context of two ongoing research studies examining the reproductive health needs of migrant women in Canada, cultural validation was required for proposed study questionnaires and protocols in a total of 13 languages. Multilingual, multiethnic women with various migrant profiles were recruited from the community to review research materials in a series of focus groups. Recommendations by these women were made in relation to consent and interpretation procedures, development of trust in research, home visits after birth, approaches to sensitive topics, inclusion of discrimination as a research variable, and reimbursement of participants. Preliminary work applying focus-group methods to mixed ethno-cultural groups yielded valuable information on appropriateness of planned research.
PubMed ID
16157945 View in PubMed
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Foreign-born and Swedish-born families' perceptions of psychosis care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90548
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Feb;18(1):62-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Hultsjö Sally
Berterö Carina
Hjelm Katarina
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden. sallyhultsjo@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Feb;18(1):62-71
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Communication Barriers
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Competency
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Europe - ethnology
Family - ethnology - psychology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Middle East - ethnology
Nursing Methodology Research
Prejudice
Professional-Family Relations
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Sweden
Vietnam - ethnology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe how foreign-born and Swedish born families living in Sweden perceive psychosis care. Eleven foreign-born and 15 Swedish-born family members were interviewed and the data were analyzed using a phenomenographic approach. The findings showed three main descriptive categories: taking responsibility, access to care, and attitudes to psychosis. The degree of responsibility in the family decreased if there was easy access to care and support from health-care staff. Knowledge of psychosis was considered to be important in order to counteract prejudiced attitudes in the family and the community. Foreign-born families did not want to be treated differently from Swedes and stressed the importance of finding ways to communicate despite communication barriers. Foreign-born families also were affected by their experiences of psychiatric care and different beliefs about psychosis in their home country. The results indicate how important it is that health-care staff members treat families on equal terms. It is necessary to take the time to identify how to communicate in a good manner and to identify families' previous experiences of and beliefs about psychosis care in order to help families face prejudice in society and to see beyond the psychosis.
PubMed ID
19125788 View in PubMed
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HIV prevention for Black women: structural barriers and opportunities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155856
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 Aug;19(3):829-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Peter A Newman
Charmaine C Williams
Notisha Massaquoi
Marsha Brown
Carmen Logie
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, 246 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A1. p.newman@utoronto.ca
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 Aug;19(3):829-41
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa - ethnology
African Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Demography
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prejudice
Primary Prevention - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Risk factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Taboo
Women's Health Services - organization & administration - utilization
Abstract
Black women bear a disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in North America. The purpose of this investigation was to explore Black Canadian women's perspectives on HIV risk and prevention. Four 90-minute focus groups (n=26) and six key informant interviews were conducted in Toronto with Black women of African and Caribbean descent and low socioeconomic status. Data analysis revealed a number of potent barriers to existing HIV preventive interventions: stigma, cultural disconnections, lack of engagement of Black religious institutions, and multiple intersecting forms of discrimination. Recommended HIV prevention opportunities included the Black church, mainstreaming, health care providers, and ethno-specific agencies. HIV prevention strategies for North American Black women, rather than focusing on HIV and individual risk behaviors, may benefit from a primary focus on social and structural factors (e.g., promoting gender equality, economic opportunity, women-controlled prevention technologies and combating racism in health care) thereby integrating HIV prevention into the larger context of community health and survival.
PubMed ID
18677073 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.