Skip header and navigation

Refine By

22 records – page 1 of 3.

Acute pain and use of local anesthesia: tooth drilling and childbirth labor pain beliefs among Anglo-Americans, Chinese, and Scandinavians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52621
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Moore
I. Brødsgaard
T K Mao
M L Miller
S F Dworkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-6370, USA. roding@u.washington.edu
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia, Local - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Dental Cavity Preparation
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Taiwan
United States
Abstract
Differences in ethnic beliefs about the perceived need for local anesthesia for tooth drilling and childbirth labor were surveyed among Anglo-Americans, Mandarin Chinese, and Scandinavians (89 dentists and 251 patients) matched for age, gender, and occupation. Subjects matched survey questionnaire items selected from previously reported interview results to estimate (a) their beliefs about the possible use of anesthetic for tooth drilling and labor pain compared with other possible remedies and (b) the choice of pain descriptors associated with the use of nonuse of anesthetic, including descriptions of injection pain. Multidimensional scaling, Gamma, and Chi-square statistics as well as odds ratios and Spearman's correlations were employed in the analysis. Seventy-seven percent of American informants reported the use of anesthetics as possible remedies for drilling and 51% reported the use of anesthetics for labor pain compared with 34% that reported the use of anesthetics among Chinese for drilling and 5% for labor pain and 70% among Scandinavians for drilling and 35% for labor pain. Most Americans and Swedes described tooth-drilling sensations as sharp, most Chinese used descriptors such as sharp and "sourish" (suan), and most Danes used words like shooting (jagende). By rank, Americans described labor pain as cramping, sharp, and excruciating, Chinese used words like sharp, intermittent, and horrible, Danes used words like shooting, tiring, and sharp, and Swedes used words like tiring, "good," yet horrible. Preferred pain descriptors for drilling, birth, and injection pains varied significantly by ethnicity. Results corroborated conclusions of a qualitative study about pain beliefs in relation to perceived needs for anesthetic in tooth drilling. Samples used to obtain the results were estimated to approach qualitative representativity for these urban ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
9790007 View in PubMed
Less detail

Being different and vulnerable: experiences of immigrant African women who have been circumcised and sought maternity care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63115
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Vanja Berggren
Staffan Bergström
Anna-Karin Edberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):50-7
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa, Eastern - ethnology
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Circumcision, Female - ethnology - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Maternal Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Professional-Patient Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to explore the encounters with the health care system in Sweden of women from Somalia, Eritrea, and Sudan who have been genitally cut. A qualitative study was performed through interviews with 22 women originally from Somalia, Sudan, and Eritrea who were living in Sweden. The women experienced being different and vulnerable, suffering from being abandoned and mutilated, and they felt exposed in the encounter with the Swedish health care personnel and tried to adapt to a new cultural context. The results of this study indicate a need for more individualized, culturally adjusted care and support and a need for systematic education about female genital cutting for Swedish health care workers.
PubMed ID
16410436 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childbirth experiences of professional Chinese Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177236
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;33(6):748-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Angela Cooper Brathwaite
Charmaine C Williams
Author Affiliation
Durham Region Public Health Department, Whitby, Ontario, Canada. angela.cooperbrathwaite@utoronto.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;33(6):748-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric - ethnology
Midwifery - methods
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Parturition - ethnology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
To explore the connections between culture and expectations surrounding the childbirth experience for professional Chinese Canadian women.
Descriptive and qualitative, using ethnographic interview.
Women were recruited from a community health care center in metropolitan Toronto.
Six professional Chinese Canadian women who had experienced at least one childbirth.
The respondents described adherence to many traditional values, beliefs, and practices throughout the pregnancy and childbirth experience. However, some practices were modified to address functioning in a context that could not support full expression of cultural traditions. Recent immigration to Canada was associated with less adherence to traditional Chinese rituals and beliefs.
Nurses cannot make assumptions about who will use traditional cultural practices or about the circumstances in which they are relevant. Nurses need to be aware of cultural expectations so they can provide culturally competent care, but they should also be aware of how to engage in discussions to clarify individual patient priorities.
PubMed ID
15561663 View in PubMed
Less detail

Colonialization: a health determinant for pregnant Dogrib women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63333
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Oct;15(4):323-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Pertice M Moffitt
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Oct;15(4):323-30
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Colonialism
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Maternal Health Services - organization & administration
Midwifery - organization & administration
Northwest Territories
Power (Psychology)
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - ethnology
Prejudice
Social Control, Formal - methods
Stereotyping
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
Childbirth for many Aboriginal women living in remote communities of the Northwest Territories, Canada, includes separation from their family and community for weeks at a time. This colonialization of childbirth, enforced for decades, is true for Dogrib Dene. Colonialization produces serious social consequences on the everyday lives of pregnant Aboriginal women, which results in lower health outcomes. This article provides a literature review of colonialization in Canada's far north establishing the position that colonialization is a determinant of health. The purpose of this article is to generate knowledge that will inform health professionals and ultimately reduce health disparities as experienced and evident among Dogrib women. By highlighting the concept of colonialization and establishing this concept as a determinant of health, nurses and midwives will identify disparities created through stressors of power and control. From there, culturally meaningful health promotion strategies will be developed and implemented within their nursing practice.
PubMed ID
15359066 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cultural and spiritual meanings of childbirth. Orthodox Jewish and Mormon women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199400
Source
J Holist Nurs. 1999 Sep;17(3):280-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
L C Callister
S. Semenic
J C Foster
Author Affiliation
Brigham Young University College of Nursing, USA.
Source
J Holist Nurs. 1999 Sep;17(3):280-95
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Christianity - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Jews - psychology
Labor, Obstetric - ethnology
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Pastoral Care
Pregnancy
Religion and Psychology
Women - psychology
Abstract
This descriptive, phenomenological study investigated the cultural and spiritual meanings of the childbirth experience from the personal perspectives of 30 Canadian Orthodox Jewish and 30 American Mormon women. Fewer Jewish women had childbirth education and attendance of their partners during childbirth than did Mormon women. Participants in the study, having codified belief systems, expressed the primary importance of bearing children in obedience to religious law. Birth was articulated as a bittersweet paradox, often accompanied by a sense of empowerment. Women described the importance of personal connectedness with others and with God, the importance of childbearing, and the spiritual and emotional dimensions of their childbirth experiences. Religious beliefs help women define the meaning of childbirth and may provide coping mechanisms for the intensity of giving birth. It is essential for holistic nurses to value and acknowledge the cultural and spiritual dimensions of the childbirth experience.
PubMed ID
10690070 View in PubMed
Less detail

The encounters that rupture the myth: contradictions in midwives' descriptions and explanations of circumcised women immigrants' sexuality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51957
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Sep;25(8):743-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Amy Leval
Catarina Widmark
Carol Tishelman
Beth Maina Ahlberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Sep;25(8):743-60
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Anecdotes
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Circumcision, Female - ethnology - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Midwifery - standards
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sweden
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to analyze how Swedish midwives (n = 26) discuss sexuality in circumcised African women patients. In focus groups and interviews, discussions concentrated on care provided to circumcised women, training received for this care, and midwives' perceptions of female circumcision. An analytic expansion was performed for discussions pertaining to sexuality and gender roles. Results from the analysis show the following: (1) ethnocentric projections of sexuality; (2) a knowledge paradox regarding circumcision and sexuality; (3) the view of the powerless circumcised women; and (4) the fact that maternity wards function as meeting places between gender and culture where the encounters with men allow masculine hegemonic norms to be ruptured. We conclude that an increased understanding of cultural epistemology is needed to ensure quality care. The encounters that take place in obstetrical care situations can provide a space where gender and culture as prescribed norms can be questioned.
PubMed ID
15371079 View in PubMed
Less detail

Feasibility of a tobacco cessation intervention for pregnant Alaska Native women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98575
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2010 Feb;12(2):79-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Christi A Patten
Richard A Windsor
Caroline C Renner
Carrie Enoch
Angela Hochreiter
Caroline Nevak
Christina A Smith
Paul A Decker
Sarah Bonnema
Christine A Hughes
Tabetha Brockman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology and Behavioral Health Research Program, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street Southwest, Charlton 6-273, Rochester, MN 55901, USA. patten.christi@mayo.edu
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2010 Feb;12(2):79-87
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Counseling - methods
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - ethnology - prevention & control
Prenatal Care - methods
Smoking - ethnology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods
Tobacco Use Disorder - ethnology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Among Alaska Native women residing in the Yukon-Kuskokwim (Y-K) Delta region of Western Alaska, about 79% smoke cigarettes or use smokeless tobacco during pregnancy. Treatment methods developed and evaluated among Alaska Native pregnant tobacco users do not exist. This pilot study used a randomized two-group design to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a targeted cessation intervention for Alaska Native pregnant women. METHODS: Recruitment occurred over an 8-month period. Enrolled participants were randomly assigned to the control group (n = 18; brief face-to-face counseling at the first visit and written materials) or to the intervention group (n = 17) consisting of face-to-face counseling at the first visit, four telephone calls, a video highlighting personal stories, and a cessation guide. Interview-based assessments were conducted at baseline and follow-up during pregnancy (>or=60 days postrandomization). Feasibility was determined by the recruitment and retention rates. RESULTS: The participation rate was very low with only 12% of eligible women (35/293) enrolled. Among enrolled participants, the study retention rates were high in both the intervention (71%) and control (94%) groups. The biochemically confirmed abstinence rates at follow-up were 0% and 6% for the intervention and control groups, respectively. DISCUSSION: The low enrollment rate suggests that the program was not feasible or acceptable. Alternative approaches are needed to improve the reach and efficacy of cessation interventions for Alaska Native women.
PubMed ID
20018946 View in PubMed
Less detail

Focus groups of Y-K Delta Alaska Natives: attitudes toward tobacco use and tobacco dependence interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3435
Source
Prev Med. 2004 Apr;38(4):421-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Caroline C Renner
Christi A Patten
Carrie Enoch
John Petraitis
Kenneth P Offord
Sarah Angstman
Andrew Garrison
Caroline Nevak
Ivana T Croghan
Richard D Hurt
Author Affiliation
Yukon--Kuskokwim Health Corporation, Bethel, AK, USA.
Source
Prev Med. 2004 Apr;38(4):421-31
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Perception
Population Groups - psychology
Pregnancy
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Tobacco Use Cessation - ethnology - psychology
Tobacco Use Disorder - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Tobacco dependence interventions developed for Alaska Natives are virtually nonexistent. Alaska Natives residing on the Yukon-Kuskokwim (Y--K) Delta in southwestern Alaska use a unique form of smokeless tobacco (ST) known as Iqmik. This study employed focus group methodology to explore attitudes toward tobacco use and tobacco dependence interventions among Alaska Natives residing on the Y-K Delta. METHODS: Twelve focus groups of former and current tobacco users were conducted in four villages in the Y-K Delta. Participants were 35 adults (83% female) and 22 adolescents (27% female). Participants completed a brief demographic and tobacco use history form. Statements from the focus groups were transcribed for content coding and analysis of the major themes. RESULTS: Use of Iqmik in the villages is thought to be ubiquitous. Y-K Delta Alaska Natives are introduced to Iqmik at a very young age. Iqmik is mostly used and prepared by young Alaska Natives and adult women. There are few perceived adverse health effects of Iqmik or other tobacco use. Although there is interest in stopping, there is a perceived lack of availability of tobacco dependence interventions. The major barriers to preventing the initiation of and stopping tobacco use are the social acceptance and widespread use and availability of tobacco. CONCLUSION: The attitudes toward tobacco and identified barriers to stopping will be useful in developing tobacco dependence interventions for Alaska Natives.
PubMed ID
15020175 View in PubMed
Less detail

The geography of belonging: the experience of birthing at home for First Nations women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145296
Source
Health Place. 2010 Jul;16(4):638-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Jude Kornelsen
Andrew Kotaska
Pauline Waterfall
Louisa Willie
Dawn Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Canada; Centre for Rural Health Research, 530-1501 West Broadway, Vancouver, BC V6J4Z6, Canada. jude@saltspringwireless.com
Source
Health Place. 2010 Jul;16(4):638-45
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
Community-Based Participatory Research
Consumer Participation
Female
Health Facility Closure
Health Services Accessibility
Home Childbirth - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Maternal health services
Mothers - psychology
Pregnancy
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Rural Health Services
Social Identification
Social Support
Travel
Abstract
The number of rural hospitals offering maternity care in British Columbia has significantly declined since 2000, mirroring trends of closures and service reductions across Canada. The impact on Aboriginal women is significant, contributing to negative maternal and newborn health and social outcomes. The present qualitative case study explored the importance of local birth for Aboriginal women from a remote BC community after the closure of local maternity services. Data collection consisted of 12 interviews and 55 completed surveys. The average participant age was 32 years old at the time of the study. From the perspective of losing local services, participants expressed the importance of local birth in reinforcing the attributes that contributed to their identities, including the importance of community and kinship ties and the strength of ties to their traditional territory.
PubMed ID
20171925 View in PubMed
Less detail

Giving birth: the voices of Orthodox Jewish women living in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181461
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Jan-Feb;33(1):80-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sonia E Semenic
Lynn Clark Callister
Perle Feldman
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. sonia.semenic@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Jan-Feb;33(1):80-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Holistic Health
Humans
Jews - ethnology
Judaism - psychology
Life Change Events
Marriage - ethnology
Maternal-Child Nursing
Mothers - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Parturition - ethnology
Pregnancy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Social Support
Spirituality
Transcultural Nursing
Abstract
To describe the meaning of the childbirth experience to Orthodox Jewish women living in Canada.
In this phenomenologic study, audiotaped interviews were conducted. Tapes were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for emergent themes. Demographic data also were collected.
Thirty Orthodox Jewish women who had given birth to healthy full-term newborns at a university-affiliated Jewish hospital in Montreal, Canada, participated in the study. Data were collected within 2 weeks after childbirth, either in the mother's postpartum hospital room or in her home.
The following themes reflecting spiritual/cultural dimensions of the childbirth experience were identified: (a) birth as a significant life event, (b) birth as a bittersweet paradox, (c) the spiritual dimensions of giving birth, (d) the importance of obedience to rabbinical law, and (e) a sense of support and affirmation.
This study documents cultural, religious, and spiritual dimensions of the childbirth experience of Orthodox Jewish women living in Canada. Knowledge and appreciation of the multiple dimensions of childbirth reflected by this study's findings can contribute to holistic and culturally competent nursing care of women and newborns.
PubMed ID
14971556 View in PubMed
Less detail

22 records – page 1 of 3.