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The artistry and ability of traditional women healers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185389
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. strut005@tc.umn.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Role
United States
Abstract
In a phenomenological research study with a purposeful sample, 6 Ojibwa and Cree indigenous women healers from Canada and the United States shared their experience of being a traditional healer. Using stories obtained during open-ended, unstructured interviews, in this article I depict the lives, backgrounds, and traditional healing practices of women who, in the past, have not been afforded an opportunity to dialogue about their healing art and abilities. The methods of these women healers, their arts and their gifts, are different from those of Western conventional medicine because of dissimilar world views related to health and illness. An increased awareness of health care providers related to the ancient art of traditional healing currently practiced in communities by gifted women who provide culturally specific holistic healing and health care is essential.
PubMed ID
12746005 View in PubMed
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La Belle Mort en Milieu Rural: a report of an ethnographic study of the good death for Quebec rural francophones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139573
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(3):159-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anne-Marie Veillette
Lise Fillion
Donna M Wilson
Roger Thomas
Serge Dumont
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche de l'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, 9 McMahon Street, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada G1R 2J6. anne-marie.veillette@crhdq.chuq.qc.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(3):159-66
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Competency
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires
Rural health services - organization & administration
Terminal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
An ethnographic study was undertaken in two rural areas of Quebec to conceptualize the good death. The findings reveal that a good quality of life for the dying person and his or her family and friends is essential for a good death. The resulting conceptual model emphasized four dimensions: physical, spiritual, social, and emotiona/psychological. These dimensions were determined to be similar to those discovered through a previous urban study, indicating that there may be considerable overlap between good deaths in rural and urban areas. Some findings of this Quebec French-language rural study were similar to those of an Alberta English-language rural study, indicating that rural people may have some common needs and interests with regard to the good death. As such, there could be some common elements of the good death that transcend culture or ethnicity. Chief among these is the desire of rural people to die at home or in their home communities.
PubMed ID
21047038 View in PubMed
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The benefit of meeting a stranger: experiences with emotional support provided by nurses among Danish-born and migrant cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144814
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2010 Jul;14(3):244-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
M. Kristiansen
T. Tjørnhøj-Thomsen
A. Krasnik
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, Building 15, 1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark. m.kristiansen@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2010 Jul;14(3):244-52
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Communication
Communication Barriers
Denmark
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Empathy
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Oncology Nursing
Psychological Theory
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Social Support
Abstract
Research among cancer patients has shown that emotional support in informal relationships may be difficult to access because of a fear or lack of knowledge about cancer. Consequently, formal relationships with healthcare professionals may be important sources of support.
This study explores needs for and experiences with emotional support provided by nurses as well as prerequisites for the provision of support among Danish-born and migrant cancer patients.
We conducted narrative interviews with 18 adult Danish-born and migrant cancer patients. Patients were recruited from a variety of places in a purposive strategic sampling process. Analysis was inspired by phenomenological methods and Simmel's theoretical concept of "the stranger".
Both Danish-born and migrant patients perceived the support delivered by healthcare professionals as available, empathic and valuable. Prerequisites for providing emotional support were 1) setting aside time for the patient to feel safe and able to verbalise emotional concerns, 2) continuity in relationships with healthcare professionals, and 3) nurses' ability to understand the patient's emotional reactions without creating additional distress.
Being positioned as a stranger to the patient gives nurses a unique position from which to provide emotional support during cancer treatment. Thus, formal relationships with healthcare professionals are of great importance for many cancer patients.
PubMed ID
20236859 View in PubMed
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Childbearing beliefs among Low-German-speaking Mennonite women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153138
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2008 Dec;55(4):420-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Judith C Kulig
Margaret Wall
Shirley Hill
Ruth Babcock
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, Canada. kulig@uleth.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2008 Dec;55(4):420-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Competency
Cultural Diversity
Emigration and Immigration
Family Planning Services
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Germany - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Mexico
Middle Aged
Multilingualism
Nursing Methodology Research
Parturition - ethnology
Postnatal Care - psychology
Prenatal Care
Protestantism - psychology
Questionnaires
Women - education - psychology
Abstract
Low-German-speaking (LGS) Mennonites are a conservative religious group that has migrated from Eastern Europe to Canada and then to countries such as Mexico. They are now returning to Canada in large numbers. They adhere to religious principles based upon a literal interpretation of the Bible. This conservative religious group provides opportunities for nurses and midwives to implement culturally competent care.
The purpose of this article is to discuss LGS Mennonite women's childbearing knowledge and beliefs to develop and implement care that considers and includes their conservative religious beliefs.
An exploratory, descriptive study was conducted to generate information through open-ended interviews with 38 LGS Mennonite women about their knowledge, beliefs and practices related to childbearing. Data collection and analysis occurred simultaneously; emerging themes were discussed by the research team to ensure a contextual understanding of the data.
The participants engage in proscribed practices ('turning the baby') and adhere to specific dietary measures (increasing dairy products) during pregnancy to ensure a healthy birth outcome. During the post-partum, extensive support is provided by other Mennonite women to assist the mother and newborn during this important transition.
Building trust and working in a respectful manner with religious groups such as the LGS Mennonites are a cornerstone of culturally competent nursing practice.
PubMed ID
19146553 View in PubMed
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Childbirth experiences of professional Chinese Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177236
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;33(6):748-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Angela Cooper Brathwaite
Charmaine C Williams
Author Affiliation
Durham Region Public Health Department, Whitby, Ontario, Canada. angela.cooperbrathwaite@utoronto.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;33(6):748-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric - ethnology
Midwifery - methods
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Parturition - ethnology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
To explore the connections between culture and expectations surrounding the childbirth experience for professional Chinese Canadian women.
Descriptive and qualitative, using ethnographic interview.
Women were recruited from a community health care center in metropolitan Toronto.
Six professional Chinese Canadian women who had experienced at least one childbirth.
The respondents described adherence to many traditional values, beliefs, and practices throughout the pregnancy and childbirth experience. However, some practices were modified to address functioning in a context that could not support full expression of cultural traditions. Recent immigration to Canada was associated with less adherence to traditional Chinese rituals and beliefs.
Nurses cannot make assumptions about who will use traditional cultural practices or about the circumstances in which they are relevant. Nurses need to be aware of cultural expectations so they can provide culturally competent care, but they should also be aware of how to engage in discussions to clarify individual patient priorities.
PubMed ID
15561663 View in PubMed
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Chinese immigrants' management of their cardiovascular disease risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163328
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2007 Nov;29(7):804-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Kathryn M King
Pamela LeBlanc
William Carr
Hude Quan
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Canada. kingk@ucalgary.ca
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2007 Nov;29(7):804-26
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - education - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
China - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Care - methods - psychology
Sex Factors
Social Identification
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The authors have undertaken a series of grounded theory studies to describe and explain how ethnocultural affiliation and gender influence the process that cardiac patients undergo when faced with making behavior changes associated with reducing their cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Data were collected through audiorecorded semistructured interviews (using an interpreter as necessary), and the authors analyzed the data using constant comparative methods. The core variable that emerged through the series of studies was "meeting the challenge." Here, the authors describe the findings from a sample of Chinese immigrants (10 men, 5 women) to Canada. The process of managing CVD risk for the Chinese immigrants was characterized by their extraordinary diligence in seeking multiple sources of information to enable them to manage their health.
PubMed ID
17526869 View in PubMed
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Clinician/patient connections in ethnoculturally nonconcordant encounters with political-asylum seekers: a comparison of physicians and nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172890
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Oct;16(4):298-311
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Peter H Koehn
Kirsti Sainola-Rodriguez
Author Affiliation
University of Montana, USA.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Oct;16(4):298-311
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Clinical Competence - standards
Dissent and Disputes
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Male
Medical Staff - education - psychology - standards
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology - standards
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Refugees - psychology
Transcultural Nursing - education - standards
Abstract
The article compares the ability of nurses and physicians to connect with patients in ethnoculturally nonconcordant clinical encounters with 41 randomly selected political-asylum seekers (PAS) residing at five Finnish reception centers in summer 2002. Doctors and nurses were equally unlikely to draw congruent assessments of the patient's past and present health condition, mixed use of biomedical/ethnocultural practices, adherence with medication and eat/drink instructions, (dis)satisfaction, and future confidence in recommended biomedical and ethnocultural approaches. Nurses were considerably more likely to hold views that were congruent with the patient's reported health care effectiveness in Finland. The findings suggest that doctors should request and place special weight on the insights of the principal attending nurse when assessing the potential contributions of personal, family, and host-society health care assets and inhibitors to a migrant patient's overall health plan. The results also suggest that culturally sensitive health care training offers specific advantages to nurses who attend to PAS.
PubMed ID
16160192 View in PubMed
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Construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older in the north of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87255
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Feb;17(4):451-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Aléx Lena
Hammarström Anne
Norberg Astrid
Lundman Berit
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.alex@nurs.umu.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Feb;17(4):451-9
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Family - ethnology
Friends - psychology
Gender Identity
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Men - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Personal Satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Concept
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Behavior
Social Values
Sweden
Work - psychology
Abstract
AIM: The aim was to analyse the construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older. BACKGROUND: All societies have a gender order, constructed from multiple ideas of what is seen as feminine and masculine. As the group of men aged 85 and older is increasing in size and their demand for care will increase, we must recognize the importance of studying these men and various discourses of masculinities. DESIGN: Qualitative explorative. METHODS: Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse thematic narratives. Masculinity theories provided the point of departure for the analysis. RESULTS: The analysis coalesced into three masculinities. 'Being in the male centre', developed from subthemes as: taking pride in one's work and economic situation; being in the centre in relation to others; regarding women as sexual objects; and belonging to a select group. 'Striving to maintain the male facade' developed from subthemes as: emphasizing 'important' connections; having feelings of loss; striving to maintain old norms and rejecting the fact of being old. 'Being related' was formulated from subthemes as: feeling at home with domestic duties; being concerned; accepting one's own aging; and reflecting on life. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates the importance of being aware of the existence of multiple masculinities, in contrast to the generally unproblematic and unsubtle particular healthcare approaches which consider men as simply belonging to one masculinity. Relevance to clinical practice. Diverse masculinities probably affect encounters between men and healthcare providers and others who work with an older population and therefore our results are of importance in a caring context.
PubMed ID
18205678 View in PubMed
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Contemporary treatments for psychological trauma from the perspective of peacekeepers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149339
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2009 Jun;41(2):115-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Susan L Ray
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2009 Jun;41(2):115-28
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anti-Anxiety Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cognitive Therapy
Complementary Therapies - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Military Psychiatry - methods
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - ethnology
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Rwanda
Self Care - methods - psychology
Somalia
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - ethnology - prevention & control
Treatment Outcome
Yugoslavia
Abstract
The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological study was to examine contemporary treatment approaches for psychological trauma from the perspective ofpeacekeepers. Data were collected via audiotaped interviews with 10 contemporary peacekeepers who had been deployed to Somalia, Rwanda, or the formerYugoslavia. The participants were asked to describe their experience with various treatments for psychological trauma. Narratives from the transcribed interviews were reviewed with the participants and their comments solicited for rigour and verification of meaning. A thematic analysis of the text, conducted to examine the ways in which contemporary treatment approaches help peacekeepers to heal from trauma, revealed 3 themes: medications as helping the most, understanding what is going on, and self-healing as a journey of discovery. The embodied nature of healing from trauma among contemporary peacekeepers should not be overlooked. Studies on the efficacy of different treatment modalities for psychological trauma, including mind-body complementary therapies, are needed.
PubMed ID
19650517 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.