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15 records – page 1 of 2.

The artistry and ability of traditional women healers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185389
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. strut005@tc.umn.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Role
United States
Abstract
In a phenomenological research study with a purposeful sample, 6 Ojibwa and Cree indigenous women healers from Canada and the United States shared their experience of being a traditional healer. Using stories obtained during open-ended, unstructured interviews, in this article I depict the lives, backgrounds, and traditional healing practices of women who, in the past, have not been afforded an opportunity to dialogue about their healing art and abilities. The methods of these women healers, their arts and their gifts, are different from those of Western conventional medicine because of dissimilar world views related to health and illness. An increased awareness of health care providers related to the ancient art of traditional healing currently practiced in communities by gifted women who provide culturally specific holistic healing and health care is essential.
PubMed ID
12746005 View in PubMed
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Discovering the literature on Aboriginal diabetes in Canada: a focus on holistic methodologies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152827
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Dec;40(4):26-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Sylvia S Barton
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. sylvia.barton@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Dec;40(4):26-54
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Community Health Nursing
Community Health Planning
Cultural Competency
Cultural Diversity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - nursing
Evidence-Based Nursing
Guidelines as Topic
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Nurse Clinicians
Nurse practitioners
Nursing Research - organization & administration
Research Design
Transcultural Nursing
Abstract
Promoting culturally competent care for diabetes is critical to addressing the health inequities of indigenous peoples. Based on a review of studies published between 1995 and 2007, the author presents a descriptive analysis of Aboriginal diabetes knowledge guiding the involvement of advanced practice nurses in programs of care. While the literature review is not systematic, it is sufficiently comprehensive to provide a theoretical backdrop to Aboriginal diabetes programs of practice and research. In terms of a particular area of Aboriginal diabetes literature, it also provides a snapshot of community-based diabetes research focused on holistic methodologies historically used in the Canadian context. The Aboriginal diabetes literature is found to be a source of rich information. Analysis of holistic methodologies, however, reveals underdevelopment of research and limited use of key holistic guidelines for Aboriginal policy research.
PubMed ID
19186784 View in PubMed
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The experience of being an Anishinabe man healer: ancient healing in a modern world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156015
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;15(2):70-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Beverly Patchell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;15(2):70-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Great Lakes Region
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - education
Health services needs and demand
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Mythology - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Professional Role - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose was to understand the experience of being an Anishinabe man healer. Of particular relevance, healers explained how they provide Indigenous health care in a world dominated by Western biomedicine.
A phenomenological approach was utilized to interview four Anishinabe men healers who reside in the United States and Canada.
In-person interviews were conducted using an interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped when permitted; otherwise notes were taken. Data analysis was conducted using techniques from Colaizzi and van Manen.
Seven themes were identified: (1) The Healer's Path, (2) Health as Wholeness, (3) Healing Ways, (4) Healing Stories, (5) Culture Interwoven with Healing, (6) Healing Exchange, and (7) Connection with Western Medicine.
The themes identified inform nursing practice by pointing out the importance of culture within traditional Indigenous healing, as well as the need for a holistic approach when caring for Indigenous people. Additionally, the Indigenous men healers acknowledged their connection with Western medicine as part of the process of healing for their clients. This emphasizes the need for nurses and other health care providers to become knowledgeable regarding traditional Indigenous healing that their clients may be receiving, in order to foster open communication.
PubMed ID
18649444 View in PubMed
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Giving birth: the voices of Orthodox Jewish women living in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181461
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Jan-Feb;33(1):80-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sonia E Semenic
Lynn Clark Callister
Perle Feldman
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. sonia.semenic@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Jan-Feb;33(1):80-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Holistic Health
Humans
Jews - ethnology
Judaism - psychology
Life Change Events
Marriage - ethnology
Maternal-Child Nursing
Mothers - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Parturition - ethnology
Pregnancy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Social Support
Spirituality
Transcultural Nursing
Abstract
To describe the meaning of the childbirth experience to Orthodox Jewish women living in Canada.
In this phenomenologic study, audiotaped interviews were conducted. Tapes were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for emergent themes. Demographic data also were collected.
Thirty Orthodox Jewish women who had given birth to healthy full-term newborns at a university-affiliated Jewish hospital in Montreal, Canada, participated in the study. Data were collected within 2 weeks after childbirth, either in the mother's postpartum hospital room or in her home.
The following themes reflecting spiritual/cultural dimensions of the childbirth experience were identified: (a) birth as a significant life event, (b) birth as a bittersweet paradox, (c) the spiritual dimensions of giving birth, (d) the importance of obedience to rabbinical law, and (e) a sense of support and affirmation.
This study documents cultural, religious, and spiritual dimensions of the childbirth experience of Orthodox Jewish women living in Canada. Knowledge and appreciation of the multiple dimensions of childbirth reflected by this study's findings can contribute to holistic and culturally competent nursing care of women and newborns.
PubMed ID
14971556 View in PubMed
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Health as continuity and balance in life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72067
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2000 Nov;22(7):812-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
A. Emami
P E Benner
J G Lipson
S L Ekman
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Occupational Therapy and Elderly Care Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2000 Nov;22(7):812-25
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Holistic Health
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Research on immigrant health emphasizes that the elderly are more vulnerable than other age groups in many immigrant populations. This study describes the meanings of health, illness, and disease for Iranian elderly immigrants in Sweden and their relationships with life disruptions. Analysis of interviews using an interpretive-phenomenological method illustrates that the participants, experience health as continuity and balance in life. Any disruption of this balance creates a sense of illness that is only partially related to the emergence of disease. Participants did not view health and disease as polarized. Rather, disease is just one component among many that may disrupt the experience of health. Health is perceived as a sense of well-being, can be achieved in spite of disease, and can be disrupted even in the absence of disease. This description of the meaning of health, disease, and illness contrasts with the Western biomedical perspective and is similar in its holism to various non-Western medical systems and complementary approaches. This knowledge can foster more culturally sensitive care.
PubMed ID
11077549 View in PubMed
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Indigenous health part 2: the underlying causes of the health gap.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149888
Source
Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-4-2009
Author
Malcolm King
Alexandra Smith
Michael Gracey
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. malcolm.king@ualberta.ca
Source
Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-85
Date
Jul-4-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Causality
Community Networks
Cultural Competency
Environmental health
Health services needs and demand
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - organization & administration
Holistic Health
Humans
Mental Disorders - ethnology
Ownership
Politics
Population Dynamics
Population Groups - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Self Concept
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
World Health
Abstract
In this Review we delve into the underlying causes of health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people and provide an Indigenous perspective to understanding these inequalities. We are able to present only a snapshot of the many research publications about Indigenous health. Our aim is to provide clinicians with a framework to better understand such matters. Applying this lens, placed in context for each patient, will promote more culturally appropriate ways to interact with, to assess, and to treat Indigenous peoples. The topics covered include Indigenous notions of health and identity; mental health and addictions; urbanisation and environmental stresses; whole health and healing; and reconciliation.
PubMed ID
19577696 View in PubMed
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Narrative mediation of conventional and new "mental health" paradigms: reading the stories of immigrant Iranian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188584
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2002 Sep;16(3):341-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Parin Dossa
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology/Anthropology, Simon Fraser University. pdossa@sfu.ca
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2002 Sep;16(3):341-59
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Arabs - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
Culture
Emigration and Immigration
Emotions
Female
Holistic Health
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Iran - ethnology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Narration
Social Support
Abstract
The potential of storytelling to effect change and produce new knowledge is being recognized across disciplines. Two conditions are necessary to realize these goals: first, reading of stories must be contextualized to include larger social and political landscapes; and second, how stories are read and toward what end must be closely examined. This article explores these issues with reference to the subject of the "mental health" or emotional well-being of a cohort of postrevolution Iranian women from metropolitan Vancouver, British Columbia. Reading their stories at a particular moment in time shows that well-being is essentially grounded in spaces and places where we live, work, and engage in social interactions. This commonplace knowledge, which is subdued in medical discourse, is retrieved through Iranian women's stories of life and living told at a time when their experiences, histories, and viewpoints on health are subject to erasure.
PubMed ID
12227260 View in PubMed
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Nursing practice with Aboriginal communities: expanding worldviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174184
Source
Nurs Sci Q. 2005 Jul;18(3):259-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Othmar F Arnold
Anne Bruce
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Nurs Sci Q. 2005 Jul;18(3):259-63
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
Cultural Diversity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Human Development
Humanism
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Knowledge
Medicine, Traditional
Models, Nursing
Mythology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Theory
Philosophy, Nursing
Semantics
Transcultural Nursing - organization & administration
Western World
Abstract
Through advances in interpretive inquiry, diverse ways of knowing and experiencing reality are increasingly made explicit in nursing literature. Nevertheless, the privileges of empiricism continue alongside a lack of language to consider other realms of reality. In this column, Aboriginal ways of constituting health and reality are explored. Morley's four categorizations of health belief systems provide a useful tool for understanding diverse worldviews. In contrast, Atleo drew on Nuu-chah-nulth origin stories to address the complexities and ambiguities of Aboriginal health beliefs. Approaches for bridging cultural differences are explored with a view toward inclusive healthcare and nursing practice.
Notes
Comment In: Nurs Sci Q. 2005 Jul;18(3):25815976049
PubMed ID
15976050 View in PubMed
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Prayer as a complementary health strategy for managing HIV-related symptoms among ethnically diverse patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76070
Source
Holist Nurs Pract. 2006 Mar-Apr;20(2):65-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
Christopher Lance Coleman
Lucille S Eller
Kathleen M Nokes
Eli Bunch
Nancy R Reynolds
Inge B Corless
Pam Dole
Jeanne K Kemppainen
Kenn Kirksey
Liz Seficik
Patrice K Nicholas
Mary Jane Hamilton
Yun-Fang Tsai
William L Holzemer
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Disparities Research, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. colemanc@nursing.upenn.edu
Source
Holist Nurs Pract. 2006 Mar-Apr;20(2):65-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Anxiety - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Depression - etiology - psychology
Faith Healing - psychology
Fatigue - etiology - psychology
Female
HIV Infections - complications - psychology
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Holistic Health
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nausea - etiology - psychology
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Taiwan
United States
Abstract
Data were analyzed from an ethnically diverse convenience sample comprising 1071 adults participating in a multisite study. Older African Americans, Hispanics, and females were more likely to use prayer as a complementary health strategy for HIV-related anxiety, depression, fatigue, and nausea. Implications for future studies are discussed.
PubMed ID
16518152 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.