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Acculturation and sexual function in Asian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171478
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Lori A Brotto
Heather M Chik
Andrew G Ryder
Boris B Gorzalka
Brooke N Seal
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gyneacology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Lori.Brotto@vch.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Cultural effects on sexuality are pervasive and potentially of great clinical importance, but have not yet received sustained empirical attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of acculturation on sexual permissiveness and sexual function, with a particular focus on arousal in Asian women living in Canada. We also compared questionnaire responses between Asian and Euro-Canadian groups in hopes of investigating whether acculturation captured unique information not predicted by ethnic group affiliation. Euro-Canadian (n = 173) and Asian (n = 176) female university students completed a battery of questionnaires in private. Euro-Canadian women had significantly more sexual knowledge and experiences, more liberal attitudes, and higher rates of desire, arousal, sexual receptivity, and sexual pleasure. Anxiety from anticipated sexual activity was significantly higher in Asian women, but the groups did not differ significantly on relationship satisfaction or problems with sexual function. Acculturation to Western culture, as well as maintained affiliation with traditional Asian heritage, were both significantly and independently related to sexual attitudes above and beyond length of residency in Canada, and beyond ethnic group comparisons. Overall, these data suggest that measurement of acculturation may capture information about an individual's unique acculturation pattern that is not evident when focusing solely on ethnic group comparisons or length of residency, and that such findings may be important in facilitating the assessment, classification, and treatment of sexual difficulties in Asian women.
PubMed ID
16362246 View in PubMed
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The artistry and ability of traditional women healers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185389
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. strut005@tc.umn.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Role
United States
Abstract
In a phenomenological research study with a purposeful sample, 6 Ojibwa and Cree indigenous women healers from Canada and the United States shared their experience of being a traditional healer. Using stories obtained during open-ended, unstructured interviews, in this article I depict the lives, backgrounds, and traditional healing practices of women who, in the past, have not been afforded an opportunity to dialogue about their healing art and abilities. The methods of these women healers, their arts and their gifts, are different from those of Western conventional medicine because of dissimilar world views related to health and illness. An increased awareness of health care providers related to the ancient art of traditional healing currently practiced in communities by gifted women who provide culturally specific holistic healing and health care is essential.
PubMed ID
12746005 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to compliance with tuberculosis treatment among women and men in Vietnam.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52539
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Oct;3(10):862-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
E. Johansson
N H Long
V K Diwan
A. Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.johansson@phs.ki.se
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Oct;3(10):862-8
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Comparative Study
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Focus Groups - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology - psychology
Prejudice
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - drug therapy - economics - ethnology - psychology
Vietnam - epidemiology
Abstract
SETTING: A study carried out in 1996 in four districts representing south and north as well as urban and rural areas of Vietnam. OBJECTIVE: To explore gender differences in knowledge, beliefs and attitudes towards tuberculosis and its treatment, and how these factors influence patients' compliance with treatment. DESIGN: Sixteen focus group discussions were performed by a multi-disciplinary research team from Vietnam and Sweden. Analysis was performed using modified Grounded Theory technique, specifically evaluating gender differences. RESULTS: Women were believed to be more compliant than men. Insufficient knowledge and individual cost during treatment were reported as main obstacles to compliance among men (poor patient compliance), while sensitivity to interaction with health staff and stigma in society (poor health staff and system compliance) were reported as the main obstacles among women. CONCLUSIONS: It is time to adopt a more comprehensive and gender-sensitive approach to compliance, which incorporates patient compliance, doctor compliance and system compliance, in order to fully support individual patients in their efforts to comply with treatment.
PubMed ID
10524582 View in PubMed
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[Attitudes to over-the-counter analgesics among 15-16 year-old teenagers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94460
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Aug 13;129(15):1451-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-2009
Author
Holager Tanja
Lagerløv Per
Helseth Sølvi
Rosvold Elin O
Author Affiliation
RELIS Sør, Oslo universitetssykehus, Rikshospitalet 0027 Oslo, Norway. tanja.holager@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Aug 13;129(15):1451-4
Date
Aug-13-2009
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analgesics - administration & dosage
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Nonprescription Drugs - administration & dosage
Norway
Pain - drug therapy
Parents
Questionnaires
Self Medication
Sex Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: More information is needed on teenagers' attitudes to self-medication with OTC-analgesics, and their access to medicine and information. MATERIAL AND METHOD: An anonymous questionnaire study was performed among all tenth grade students in Drammen, a middle sized city in Norway, in spring 2007. RESULTS: 367 students participated in the study, 55 of them had a non-western background. 24 % of boys and 41 % of girls stated that analgesics could be used whenever they experienced pain. Among these, 91 % had taken analgesics during the previous four weeks, among those who thought that analgesics should not be used 50 % had taken it. The girls reported episodes of pain more often than the boys, but analgesics were used to treat pain to the same extent by all students, irrelevant of sex and cultural background. 77 % of students with a western origin and 62 % of those from non-western countries felt free to use OTC-analgesics at home without asking for permission. 31 % of western girls got analgesics from their friends. 8.5 % bought medicines at the pharmacy and 7.1 % bought them in grocery shops. Information on how to alleviate pain with medicine was usually given by the parents. INTERPRETATION: Teenagers in secondary school have different opinions on self-medication with OTC-analgesics. The parents assist their children in how to manage pain. 15 - 16 year-olds experience much pain, and mainly have free access to analgesics at home.
PubMed ID
19690593 View in PubMed
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Being a woman: perspectives of low-german-speaking mennonite women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152302
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Apr;30(4):324-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Judith C Kulig
Ruth Babcock
Margaret Wall
Shirley Hill
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. Kulig@uleth.ca
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Apr;30(4):324-38
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Christianity
Contraception Behavior - ethnology
Cultural Competency
Female
Germany - ethnology
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
Understanding the beliefs and knowledge related to women's sexuality is important when working with unique religious groups in order to provide culturally appropriate care. An exploratory, descriptive qualitative study generated knowledge, beliefs, and practices related to menstruation, ovulation, and family planning among Low German-speaking (LGS) Mennonite women (n = 38). There is a pervasive silence that surrounds sexuality among this group, who have a limited understanding of the physiological changes they experience. Honoring religious principles and family and community expectations through acceptable female behavior is essential. Adherence to religious principles varies by family but is not shared with the group to avoid disfavor.
PubMed ID
19255886 View in PubMed
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Breast and cervical cancer screening practices among American Indian and Alaska Native women in the United States, 1992-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3988
Source
Prev Med. 1999 Oct;29(4):287-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
S S Coughlin
R J Uhler
D K Blackman
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341, USA. SIC9@CDC.Gov
Source
Prev Med. 1999 Oct;29(4):287-95
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis
Educational Status
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that American Indian and Alaska Native women have important barriers to cancer screening and underuse cancer screening tests. METHODS: We examined the breast and cervical cancer screening practices of 4,961 American Indian and Alaska Native women in 47 states from 1992 through 1997 by using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. RESULTS: About 65.1% [95% confidence interval (CI) 60.2 to 69.9%] of women in this sample aged 50 years or older had received a mammogram in the past 2 years. About 82.6% (95% CI 80.1 to 85.2%) of women aged 18 years or older who had not undergone a hysterectomy had received a Papanicolaou test in the past 3 years. Older women and those with less education were less likely to be screened. Women who had seen a physician in the past year were much more likely to have been screened. CONCLUSIONS: These results underscore the need for continued efforts to ensure that American Indian and Alaska Native women who are elderly or medically underserved have access to cancer screening services.
Notes
Erratum In: Prev Med 2000 Apr;30(4):348-52
PubMed ID
10547054 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening practices and correlates among American Indian and Alaska native women in California, 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97787
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2010 Mar-Apr;20(2):139-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan M Eberth
John Charles Huber
Antonio Rene
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, Houston, TX 77098, USA. Jan.M.Eberth@uth.tmc.edu
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2010 Mar-Apr;20(2):139-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology
California - epidemiology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Mammography
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Breast cancer incidence and mortality have been increasing among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women, and their survival rate is the lowest of all racial/ethnic groups. Nevertheless, knowledge of AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices and their correlates is limited. METHODS: Using the 2003 California Health Interview Survey, we 1) compared the breast cancer screening practices of AI/AN women to other groups and 2) explored the association of several factors known or thought to influence AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices. FINDINGS: Compared with other races, AI/AN women had the lowest rate of mammogram screening (ever and within the past 2 years). For clinical breast examination receipt, Asian women had the lowest rate, followed by AI/AN women. Factors associated with AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices included older age, having a high school diploma or some college education, receipt of a Pap test within the past 3 years, and having visited a doctor within the past year. CONCLUSION: Significant differences in breast cancer screening practices were noted between races, with AI/AN women often having significantly lower rates. Integrating these epidemiologic findings into effective policy and practice requires additional applied research initiatives.
PubMed ID
20211430 View in PubMed
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Cajun traditions and their impact on health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216505
Source
J Cult Divers. 1995;2(1):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
M D Oriol
Source
J Cult Divers. 1995;2(1):27-30
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Emigration and Immigration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Louisiana
Transcultural Nursing - education - methods
Abstract
This article will explore food preparation and faith healing practices of contemporary Cajun culture. Decades of exile and oppression required the early Cajuns to make use of scarce resources as a means of survival. Although modern society offers technological advances and information that can lead to more positive health outcomes, this close-knit group of hearty individuals frequently chooses to leave many traditional practices unchanged. Health care practitioners must understand the beliefs and practices of the Cajun people in order to meet their health needs.
PubMed ID
7663898 View in PubMed
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Canadian Aboriginal people's experiences with HIV/AIDS as portrayed in selected English language Aboriginal media (1996-2000).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175886
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 May;60(10):2169-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Juanne N Clarke
Daniela B Friedman
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology; Anthropology, Wilfrid Laurier University, 75 University Avenue, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3C5. jclarke@wlu.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 May;60(10):2169-80
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - etiology - prevention & control
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Bibliometrics
Canada
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Newspapers
Public Opinion
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Spirituality
Stereotyping
Abstract
This paper describes the portrayal of HIV/AIDS in 14 mass print newspapers directed towards the Canadian Aboriginal population and published between 1996 and 2000. Based on qualitative content analysis the research examines both manifest and latent meanings. Manifest results of this study indicate that women and youth are under represented as persons with HIV/AIDS. The latent results note the frequent references to Aboriginal culture, and the political and economic position of Aboriginal Canadians when discussing the disease, the person with the disease, the fear of the disease and the reaction of the community to the person with the disease. Unlike mainstream media where the medical frame is dominant, HIV/AIDS are here contextualized by culture, identity, spirituality and political-economic issues.
PubMed ID
15748666 View in PubMed
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74 records – page 1 of 8.