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La Belle Mort en Milieu Rural: a report of an ethnographic study of the good death for Quebec rural francophones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139573
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(3):159-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anne-Marie Veillette
Lise Fillion
Donna M Wilson
Roger Thomas
Serge Dumont
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche de l'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, 9 McMahon Street, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada G1R 2J6. anne-marie.veillette@crhdq.chuq.qc.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(3):159-66
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Competency
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires
Rural health services - organization & administration
Terminal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
An ethnographic study was undertaken in two rural areas of Quebec to conceptualize the good death. The findings reveal that a good quality of life for the dying person and his or her family and friends is essential for a good death. The resulting conceptual model emphasized four dimensions: physical, spiritual, social, and emotiona/psychological. These dimensions were determined to be similar to those discovered through a previous urban study, indicating that there may be considerable overlap between good deaths in rural and urban areas. Some findings of this Quebec French-language rural study were similar to those of an Alberta English-language rural study, indicating that rural people may have some common needs and interests with regard to the good death. As such, there could be some common elements of the good death that transcend culture or ethnicity. Chief among these is the desire of rural people to die at home or in their home communities.
PubMed ID
21047038 View in PubMed
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Connection between the meaning of health and interaction with health professionals: caring for immigrant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163969
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2007 Apr;28(4):309-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Swarna Weerasinghe
Terry Mitchell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. swarna.weerasinghe@dal.ca
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2007 Apr;28(4):309-28
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Middle Aged
Narration
Nova Scotia
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Women's health
Abstract
The meaning of health perceived by adult immigrant women in Canada is discussed from the perspectives of immigration, culture, and lived experience to understand their encounters with health care professionals. Authors base their findings on the thematic analysis of focus group data. Immigrant women viewed health as the outcome of a web of interactions between conditions of mental, physical, social, emotional, environmental, and spiritual well-being, appealing to both biomedical and phenomenological ideologies. Our analyses of qualitative data revealed that the disagreements noted by immigrant women when interacting with health care professionals were due to the discrepancies between their cultural views of health and the dominant biomedical perspective.
PubMed ID
17454180 View in PubMed
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Cultural challenges in end-of-life care: reflections from focus groups' interviews with hospice staff in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72205
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Mar;31(3):623-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
S. Ekblad
A. Marttila
M. Emilsson
Author Affiliation
Unit for Immigrant Environment and Health, National Swedish Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden. solvig.ekblad@ipm.ki.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Mar;31(3):623-30
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospice Care - psychology
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Cultural challenges in end-of-life care: reflections from focus groups' interviews with hospice staff in Stockholm During the past few decades, Swedish society has changed from a society with a few ethnic groups to one with over a hundred groups of different ethnic backgrounds, languages and religions. As society is becoming increasingly multicultural, cultural issues are also becoming an important feature in health care, particularly in end-of-life care where the questions of existential nature are of great importance. However, cultural issues in health care, especially at hospices, have not been studied sufficiently in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to gather reflections about cultural issues among hospice staff after a 3-day seminar in multicultural end-of-life care, by using a qualitative focus groups method. The 19 participants (majority nurses) were divided into three groups, one per hospice unit. A discussion guide was developed with the following themes: 1) post-training experiences of working with patients with multicultural background; 2) experiences gained by participating in the course of multicultural end-of-life care; 3) post-training reflections about one's own culture; 4) ideas or thoughts regarding work with patients from other cultures arising from the training; and 5) the need for further training in multicultural end-of-life care. One of the study's main findings was that to better understand other cultures it is important to raise awareness about the staff's own culture and to pay attention to culture especially in the context of the individual. The findings from focus groups provide insight regarding the need for planning flexible training in cultural issues to match the needs of the staff at the hospice units studied.
PubMed ID
10718882 View in PubMed
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Determinants of Black women's health in rural and remote communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160555
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2007 Sep;39(3):56-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Josephine Etowa
Juliana Wiens
Wanda Thomas Bernard
Barbara Clow
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Josephine.Etowa@dal.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2007 Sep;39(3):56-76
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
African Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medically underserved area
Nova Scotia
Nursing Methodology Research
Poverty
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Social Distance
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Women - psychology
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
The On the Margins project investigated health status, health-care delivery, and use of health services among African-Canadian women residing in rural and remote regions of the province of Nova Scotia. A participatory action research approach provided a framework for the study. Triangulation of data-collection methods--interviews, focus groups, and questionnaires--formed the basis of data generation. A total of 237 in-depth one-on-one interviews were conducted and coded verbatim. Atlas-ti data-management software was used to facilitate coding and analysis. Six themes emerged from the data: Black women's multiple roles, perceptions of health, experiences with the health-care system, factors affecting health, strategies for managing health, and envisioning solutions. The authors focus on 1 of these themes, factors affecting Black women's health, and discuss 3 subthemes: race and racism, poverty and unemployment, and access to health care.
PubMed ID
17970460 View in PubMed
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Diabetes education materials: recommendations of tribal leaders, Indian health professionals, and American Indian community members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198131
Source
Diabetes Educ. 2000 Mar-Apr;26(2):290-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Y D Roubideaux
K. Moore
C. Avery
B. Muneta
M. Knight
D. Buchwald
Author Affiliation
Center for Native American Health, University of Arizona, Tucson 85724, USA. yvetter@u.arizona.edu
Source
Diabetes Educ. 2000 Mar-Apr;26(2):290-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - prevention & control
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Program Evaluation
Teaching Materials - standards
United States
Abstract
The Association of American Indian Physicians, the only national organization of its kind, conducted a series of focus groups to gather input from tribal leaders, Indian health professionals, and American Indian community members to guide the development of culturally appropriate diabetes education materials for the National Diabetes Education Program.
During the focus groups, participants shared their experiences with and recommendations for a variety of diabetes education materials.
Overall, 95% of participants expressed a strong preference for diabetes education materials relevant to their specific tribe or culture.
Recommendations from these focus groups were used to develop a national diabetes education campaign for American Indian communities.
PubMed ID
10865594 View in PubMed
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Discussions on oral health care among elderly Chinese immigrants in Melbourne and Vancouver.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124157
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e822-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Michael I MacEntee
Rodrigo Mariño
Sabrina Wong
Asuman Kiyak
Victor Minichiello
Iris Chi
Edward C M Lo
Lin Huancai
Author Affiliation
ELDERS Research Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. macentee@dentistry.ubc.ca
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e822-32
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
China - ethnology
Dental Care for Aged - economics
Eating - physiology
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - psychology
Esthetics, Dental
Family Relations - ethnology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior
Health Care Costs
Health Education, Dental
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Language
Male
Medicine, Chinese Traditional
Mouth Diseases - prevention & control
Oral Health - ethnology
Social Values
Victoria
Abstract
This study explored how elderly Chinese immigrants value and relate to how acculturation influences oral health and subsequent service use.
Elders who had immigrated to Melbourne and Vancouver within the previous 15 years were recruited from local community centres and assigned to focus groups of 5-7 participants in Vancouver (4 groups) or Melbourne (5 groups).
Following an iterative process of thematic analysis, the discussions revealed that immigrants care about the comfort and appearance of their teeth, and they value Western dentistry as a supplement to traditional remedies, but they have difficulty getting culturally sensitive information about oral health care. Accessing dentistry, they explained, is distressing because of language problems and financial costs that impose on their children. Consequently, many immigrants obtain dental treatment in China when they return for occasional visits. They felt that separation of dentistry from national health care programmes in Canada and Australia disregards natural links between oral health and general health.
The similarity of concerns in both cities suggests that dissemination of information and availability of services are the important themes influencing oral health, and that, beliefs developed over a lifetime play an important role in interpreting oral health in the host country.
PubMed ID
22616910 View in PubMed
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Doctor-patient communications in the Aboriginal community: towards the development of educational programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168226
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Sep;62(3):340-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Angela Towle
William Godolphin
Ted Alexander
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine & Division of Health Care Communication, College of Health Disciplines, The University of British Columbia, 3250-910 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V5Z 4E3. atowle@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Sep;62(3):340-6
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
Clinical Competence - standards
Communication
Cultural Diversity
Empathy
Fear - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Needs Assessment
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Physician-Patient Relations
Program Development
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Time Perception
Trust - psychology
Abstract
Aboriginal people in Canada have poorer health than the rest of the population. Reasons for health disparities are many and include problems in communication between doctor and patient. The objective of this study was to understand doctor-patient communication in Aboriginal communities in order to design educational interventions for medical students based on the needs and experiences of patients.
Experiences of good and poor communication were studied by semi-structured interviews or focus groups with 22 Aboriginal community members, 2 community health representatives and 2 Aboriginal trainee physicians. Transcribed data were coded and subjected to thematic analysis.
Positive and negative experiences of communicating with physicians fell into three broad and interrelated themes: their histories as First Nations citizens; the extent to which the physician was trusted; time in the medical interview.
Aboriginal peoples' history affects their communication with physicians; barriers may be overcome when patients feel they have a voice and the time for it to be heard.
Physicians can improve communication with Aboriginal patients by learning about their history, building trust and giving time.
PubMed ID
16860965 View in PubMed
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The encounters that rupture the myth: contradictions in midwives' descriptions and explanations of circumcised women immigrants' sexuality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51957
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Sep;25(8):743-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Amy Leval
Catarina Widmark
Carol Tishelman
Beth Maina Ahlberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Sep;25(8):743-60
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Anecdotes
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Circumcision, Female - ethnology - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Midwifery - standards
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sweden
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to analyze how Swedish midwives (n = 26) discuss sexuality in circumcised African women patients. In focus groups and interviews, discussions concentrated on care provided to circumcised women, training received for this care, and midwives' perceptions of female circumcision. An analytic expansion was performed for discussions pertaining to sexuality and gender roles. Results from the analysis show the following: (1) ethnocentric projections of sexuality; (2) a knowledge paradox regarding circumcision and sexuality; (3) the view of the powerless circumcised women; and (4) the fact that maternity wards function as meeting places between gender and culture where the encounters with men allow masculine hegemonic norms to be ruptured. We conclude that an increased understanding of cultural epistemology is needed to ensure quality care. The encounters that take place in obstetrical care situations can provide a space where gender and culture as prescribed norms can be questioned.
PubMed ID
15371079 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.