Skip header and navigation

Refine By

20 records – page 1 of 2.

An examination of cancer risk beliefs among adults from Toronto's Somali, Chinese, Russian and Spanish-speaking communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190520
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):138-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Judy A Paisley
Jess Haines
Marlene Greenberg
Mary-Jo Makarchuk
Sarah Vogelzang
Krystyna Lewicki
Author Affiliation
School of Nutrition, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3. j2paisle@ryerson.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):138-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Culture
Disease Susceptibility - ethnology
Female
Food Supply - standards
Health education
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology - psychology
Ontario
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Somalia - ethnology
Spain - ethnology
Abstract
Canada's growing ethnocultural diversity challenges health professionals to develop culturally sensitive cancer prevention strategies. Little is known about the ethnocultural specificity of cancer risk beliefs. This qualitative pilot study examined cancer risk beliefs, focusing on diet, among adults from Toronto's Somali, Chinese, Russian, and Spanish-speaking communities.
Group interviews (n = 4) were conducted with convenience samples of adults (total n = 45) from four ethnocultural communities (total 45 participants).
The constant comparison method of data analysis identified three common themes: knowledge of cancer risk factors, concern about the food supply, and the roles of spiritual and emotional well-being. Two areas of contrasting belief concerning specific mediators of cancer risk were identified.
Findings support the investigation of cultural-specific health promotion strategies emphasizing both the maintenance of traditional cancer protective eating practices and the adoption of additional healthy eating practices among new Canadians. More research is needed to enhance our understanding of ethnoculturally specific cancer risk beliefs and practices to ensure the cultural relevance of programming.
PubMed ID
11963519 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers to providing effective mental health services to American Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191397
Source
Ment Health Serv Res. 2001 Dec;3(4):215-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
J L Johnson
M C Cameron
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University at Buffalo, New York 14260-1050, USA. jj44@acsu.buffalo.edu
Source
Ment Health Serv Res. 2001 Dec;3(4):215-23
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Prejudice
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Like most indigenous populations throughout the world who have undergone innumerable cultural changes, the mental health care needs of American Indians are great. Some surveys conducted by the Indian Health Service show high rates of suicide, mortality, depression and substance abuse. Little is known about effective mental health care among American Indians due, in part, to the lack of culturally appropriate models of mental health in American Indians. This article presents a cultural framework in order to understand the mental health care needs of American Indians and discusses barriers to providing effective mental health services to American Indians.
PubMed ID
11859967 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cultural influences on willingness to seek treatment for social anxiety in Chinese- and European-heritage students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156189
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2008 Jul;14(3):215-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Lorena Hsu
Lynn E Alden
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. lhsu@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2008 Jul;14(3):215-23
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
Culture
Europe - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Phobic Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Questionnaires
Volition
Abstract
We examined culture-related influences on willingness to seek treatment for social anxiety in first- and second-generation students of Chinese heritage (Ns=65, 47, respectively), and their European-heritage counterparts (N=60). Participants completed measures that assessed their willingness to seek treatment for various levels of social anxiety. Results showed that participants were similar on willingness to seek treatment at low- and high-severity levels of social anxiety; however, at moderate levels, first-generation Chinese participants were significantly less willing to seek treatment compared to their European-heritage counterparts. The reluctance of first-generation Chinese participants to seek treatment was associated with greater Chinese-heritage acculturation, and was not related to perceiving symptoms of social anxiety as less impairing. The findings support the general contention that Asians in North America tend to delay treatment for mental health problems.
PubMed ID
18624586 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cut-point shift and index shift in self-reported health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177300
Source
J Health Econ. 2004 Nov;23(6):1083-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Maarten Lindeboom
Eddy van Doorslaer
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Tinbergen Institute Amsterdam, Free University of Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1005, Amsterdam 1081 HV, The Netherlands. mlindeboom@feweb.vu.nl
Source
J Health Econ. 2004 Nov;23(6):1083-99
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Culture
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Psychometrics
Self-Assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
There is some concern that ordered responses on health questions may differ across populations or even across subgroups of a population. This reporting heterogeneity may invalidate group comparisons and measures of health inequality. This paper proposes a test for differential reporting in ordered response models which enables to distinguish between cut-point shift and index shift. The method is illustrated using Canadian National Population Health Survey data. The McMaster Health Utility Index Mark 3 (HUI3) is used as a more objective health measure than the simple five-point scale of self-assessed health. We find clear evidence of index shifting and cut-point shifting for age and gender, but not for income, education or language.
PubMed ID
15556237 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effects of culture and self-construal on responses to threatening health information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127495
Source
Psychol Health. 2012;27(10):1194-210
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jill A Jacobson
Li-Jun Ji
Peter H Ditto
Zhiyong Zhang
Dara H Sorkin
Sarah K Warren
Veronica Legnini
Anna Ebel-Lam
Sarah Roper-Coleman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Queen's University, 62 Arch Street, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada. jill.jacobson@queensu.ca
Source
Psychol Health. 2012;27(10):1194-210
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
California
Culture
Deception
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Ontario
Perceptual Defense
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Abstract
The current studies examined if cultural and self-construal differences in self-enhancement extended to defensive responses to health threats.
Responses to fictitious medical diagnoses were compared between Asian-Americans and European-North Americans in experiment 1 and between Canadians primed with an interdependent versus an independent self-construal in experiment 3. In experiment 2, the responses of Chinese and Canadians who were either heavy or light soft drink consumers were assessed after reading an article linking soft drink consumption to insulin resistance.
The primary-dependent measure reflected participants' defensiveness about threatening versus nonthreatening health information.
In experiment 1, all participants responded more defensively to an unfavourable than a favourable diagnosis; however, Asian-Americans responded less defensively than did European-North Americans. In experiment 2, all high soft drink consumers were less convinced by the threatening information than were low soft drink consumers; however, among high consumers, Chinese changed their self-reported consumption levels less than did European-Canadians. In experiment 3, interdependence-primed participants responded less defensively to an unfavourable diagnosis than did independence-primed participants.
Defensive reactions to threatening health information were found consistently; however, self-enhancement was more pronounced in individuals with Western cultural backgrounds or independent self-construals.
PubMed ID
22288661 View in PubMed
Less detail

European public acceptance of euthanasia: socio-demographic and cultural factors associated with the acceptance of euthanasia in 33 European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82642
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Aug;63(3):743-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Cohen Joachim
Marcoux Isabelle
Bilsen Johan
Deboosere Patrick
van der Wal Gerrit
Deliens Luc
Author Affiliation
End-of-Life Care Research Group, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium. jcohen@vub.ac.be
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Aug;63(3):743-56
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Demography
Empirical Research
Europe
Euthanasia
Female
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In many European countries, the last decade has been marked by an increasing debate about the acceptability and regulation of euthanasia and other end-of-life decisions in medical practice. Growing public sensibility to a 'right to die' for terminally ill patients has been one of the main constituents of these debates. Within this context, we sought to describe and compare acceptance of euthanasia among the general public in 33 European countries. We used the European Values Study data of 1999-2000 with a total of 41125 respondents (63% response rate) in 33 European countries. The main outcome measure concerned the acceptance of euthanasia (defined as 'terminating the life of the incurably sick', rated on a scale from 1 to 10). Results showed that the acceptance of euthanasia tended to be high in some countries (e.g. the Netherlands, Denmark, France, Sweden), while a markedly low acceptance was found in others (e.g. Romania, Malta and Turkey). A multivariate ordinal regression showed that weaker religious belief was the most important factor associated with a higher acceptance; however, there were also socio-demographic differences: younger cohorts, people from non-manual social classes, and people with a higher educational level tended to have a higher acceptance of euthanasia. While religious belief, socio-demographic factors, and also moral values (i.e. the belief in the right to self-determination) could largely explain the differences between countries, our findings suggest that perceptions regarding euthanasia are probably also influenced by national traditions and history (e.g. Germany). Thus, we demonstrated clear cross-national differences with regard to the acceptance of euthanasia, which can serve as an important basis for further debate and research in the specific countries.
PubMed ID
16537097 View in PubMed
Less detail

Field research with underserved minorities: the ideal and the real.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174452
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2 Suppl 3):iii56-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Arlene Rubin Stiffman
Stacey Freedenthal
Eddie Brown
Emily Ostmann
Patricia Hibbeler
Author Affiliation
The George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Comorbidity and Addictions Center, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA. arstiff@wustl.edu
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2 Suppl 3):iii56-66
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Behavioral Research - methods
Child
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Culture
Health Services Research - methods
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Medically underserved area
Minority Groups
Research Design
Southwestern United States
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Abstract
The realities of doing field research with high-risk, minority, or indigenous populations may be quite different than the guidelines presented in research training. There are overlapping and competing demands created by cultural and research imperatives. A National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)-funded study of American Indian youth illustrates competing pressures between research objectives and cultural sensitivity. This account of the problems that were confronted and the attempts made to resolve them will hopefully fill a needed gap in the research literature and serve as a thought-provoking example for other researchers. This study built cross-cultural bridges. Researchers worked as a team with stakeholders to modify the instruments and methods to achieve cultural appropriateness. The researchers agreed to the communities' demands for increased service access and rights of refusal for all publications and presentations. Data indicate that these compromises did not substantially harm the first year of data collection completeness or the well-being of the youth. To the contrary, it enhanced the ability to disseminate results to those community leaders with the most vested interests. The conflicts between ideal research requirements and cultural demands confronted by the researchers and interviewers in the American Indian community were not necessarily different from issues faced by researchers in other communities. Of major import is the recognition that there are no easy answers to such issues within research.
Notes
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2000 Aug;39(8):1032-910939232
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2001 Aug;52(8):1088-9411474056
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Jul;92(7):1067-7012084680
Cites: Am Psychol. 2002 Dec;57(12):1024-4012613155
Cites: Ethics Behav. 2003;13(4):303-3215000093
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2004 Summer;34(2):160-7115191272
Cites: Int J Addict. 1990-1991;25(5A-6A):655-852101397
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1996 Oct;64(5):856-608916611
Cites: Addict Behav. 2005 Jun;30(5):889-90415893087
Cites: Ethics Behav. 2005;15(1):1-1416127856
PubMed ID
15933332 View in PubMed
Less detail

First Nations people's challenge in managing coronary artery disease risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160905
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Oct;17(8):1074-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Kathryn M King
Julianne Sanguins
Lisa McGregor
Pamela LeBlanc
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Oct;17(8):1074-87
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Artery Disease - ethnology - prevention & control
Culture
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
First Nations peoples bring a particular history and cultural perspective to healing and well-being that significantly influences their health behaviors. The authors used grounded theory methods to describe and explain how ethnocultural affiliation and gender influence the process that 22 First Nations people underwent when making lifestyle changes related to their coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The transcribed interviews revealed a core variable, meeting the challenge. Meeting the challenge of CAD risk management was influenced by intrapersonal, interpersonal (relationships with others), extrapersonal (i.e., the community and government), sociodemographic, and gendered factors. Salient elements for the participants included their beliefs about origins of illness, the role of family, challenges to accessing information, financial and resource management, and the gendered element of body image. Health care providers need to understand the historical, social, and culturally embedded factors that influence First Nations people's appraisal of their CAD.
PubMed ID
17928480 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health culture within the context of the northern environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30836
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 May;62(2):167-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Hellevi Tervo
Ludger Müller-Wille
Merja Nikkonen
Author Affiliation
Rovaniemi College of Health and Welfare, Rovaniemi, Finland. hellevi.tervo@roiami.fi
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 May;62(2):167-81
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Ethnic Groups
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This article is part of an ethnographic study that aims to describe and understand health as a phenomenon of the Sami culture. STUDY DESIGN: The article is based on literature concerning the northern environment and the Sami culture, which is analysed from the point of view of health culture. RESULTS: From the point of view of health culture, life in the northern regions requires adaptation to certain special features of the climate and the natural environment. Nature is also a versatile source of health care, healing and traditions. Particularly in the late 1990's, the northern environment and the Sami lifestyle were profoundly affected by changes in the sources of income caused by modernisation and the adaptation of traditional Sami livelihoods to governmental regulations. The current Sami values and beliefs are multilayered factors affecting health culture. The social growth milieu of Sami children as a source of health culture has changed over the generations. The key elements affecting the growth milieu have changed over time, due to the attitude of the government towards the Sami culture and the consequent changes and actions of society.
PubMed ID
12862180 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indigenous life stories as narratives of health and resistance: a dialogical narrative analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121595
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):64-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Bodil Hansen Blix
Torunn Hamran
Hans Ketil Normann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Care Research, Department of Health and Care Sciences, University of Tromso, Norway.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):64-85
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Female
Humans
Male
Narration
Norway
Population Groups - ethnology - psychology
Transcultural Nursing - methods
Abstract
The Sami people have historically been exposed to severe assimilation processes. The objective of this study was to explore elderly Samis' experiences of health. A total of 19 elderly Sami individuals in Norway were interviewed.This article is a dialogical narrative analysis of the life stories of 3 Sami women. The life stories are perceived as narratives of health and resistance. Postcolonial theory provides a framework for understanding the impact of historical and socioeconomic factors in people's lives and health. Narratives of resistance demonstrate that people are not passive victims of the legacy of colonialism. Resistance is not a passive state but an active process, as is health. Resistance is a resource that should be appreciated by health services, both at a systemic level--for example, through partnership with Indigenous elderly in the planning and shaping of services--and in individual encounters between patients and healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
22894007 View in PubMed
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.