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Aboriginal urbanization and rights in Canada: examining implications for health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115712
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Laura C Senese
Kathi Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography & Program in Planning, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 5047, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, Canada. laura.senese@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Status Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Urban Health - ethnology
Urbanization
Young Adult
Abstract
Urbanization among Indigenous peoples is growing globally. This has implications for the assertion of Indigenous rights in urban areas, as rights are largely tied to land bases that generally lie outside of urban areas. Through their impacts on the broader social determinants of health, the links between Indigenous rights and urbanization may be related to health. Focusing on a Canadian example, this study explores relationships between Indigenous rights and urbanization, and the ways in which they are implicated in the health of urban Indigenous peoples living in Toronto, Canada. In-depth interviews focused on conceptions of and access to Aboriginal rights in the city, and perceived links with health, were conduced with 36 Aboriginal people who had moved to Toronto from a rural/reserve area. Participants conceived of Aboriginal rights largely as the rights to specific services/benefits and to respect for Aboriginal cultures/identities. There was a widespread perception among participants that these rights are not respected in Canada, and that this is heightened when living in an urban area. Disrespect for Aboriginal rights was perceived to negatively impact health by way of social determinants of health (e.g., psychosocial health impacts of discrimination experienced in Toronto). The paper discusses the results in the context of policy implications and future areas of research.
PubMed ID
23474122 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and sexual function in Asian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171478
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Lori A Brotto
Heather M Chik
Andrew G Ryder
Boris B Gorzalka
Brooke N Seal
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gyneacology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Lori.Brotto@vch.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Cultural effects on sexuality are pervasive and potentially of great clinical importance, but have not yet received sustained empirical attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of acculturation on sexual permissiveness and sexual function, with a particular focus on arousal in Asian women living in Canada. We also compared questionnaire responses between Asian and Euro-Canadian groups in hopes of investigating whether acculturation captured unique information not predicted by ethnic group affiliation. Euro-Canadian (n = 173) and Asian (n = 176) female university students completed a battery of questionnaires in private. Euro-Canadian women had significantly more sexual knowledge and experiences, more liberal attitudes, and higher rates of desire, arousal, sexual receptivity, and sexual pleasure. Anxiety from anticipated sexual activity was significantly higher in Asian women, but the groups did not differ significantly on relationship satisfaction or problems with sexual function. Acculturation to Western culture, as well as maintained affiliation with traditional Asian heritage, were both significantly and independently related to sexual attitudes above and beyond length of residency in Canada, and beyond ethnic group comparisons. Overall, these data suggest that measurement of acculturation may capture information about an individual's unique acculturation pattern that is not evident when focusing solely on ethnic group comparisons or length of residency, and that such findings may be important in facilitating the assessment, classification, and treatment of sexual difficulties in Asian women.
PubMed ID
16362246 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and sexual function in Canadian East Asian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166675
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lori A Brotto
Jane S T Woo
Andrew G Ryder
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Obstetrics/Gynaecology, Vancouver, BC, Canada. lori.brotto@vch.ca
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of considering acculturation when investigating the sexuality of East Asian women in North America. Moreover, bidimensional assessment of both heritage and mainstream cultural affiliations provides significantly more information about sexual attitudes than simple unidimensional measures, such as length of residency in the Western culture.
The goal of this study was to extend the findings in women to a sample of East Asian men.
Self-report measures of sexual behaviors, sexual responses, and sexual satisfaction.
Euro-Canadian (N = 124) and East Asian (N = 137) male university students privately completed a battery of questionnaires in exchange for course credit. Results. Group comparisons revealed East Asian men to have significantly lower liberal sexual attitudes and experiences, and a significantly lower proportion had engaged in sexual intercourse compared with the Euro-Canadian sample. In addition, the East Asian men had significantly higher Impotence and Avoidance subscale scores on the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction, a measure of sexual dysfunction. Focusing on East Asian men alone, mainstream acculturation, but not length of residency in Canada, was significantly related to sexual attitudes, experiences, and responses.
Overall, these data replicate the findings in women and suggest that specific acculturation effects over and above length of residency should be included in the cultural assessment of men's sexual health.
PubMed ID
17087799 View in PubMed
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The artistry and ability of traditional women healers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185389
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. strut005@tc.umn.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Role
United States
Abstract
In a phenomenological research study with a purposeful sample, 6 Ojibwa and Cree indigenous women healers from Canada and the United States shared their experience of being a traditional healer. Using stories obtained during open-ended, unstructured interviews, in this article I depict the lives, backgrounds, and traditional healing practices of women who, in the past, have not been afforded an opportunity to dialogue about their healing art and abilities. The methods of these women healers, their arts and their gifts, are different from those of Western conventional medicine because of dissimilar world views related to health and illness. An increased awareness of health care providers related to the ancient art of traditional healing currently practiced in communities by gifted women who provide culturally specific holistic healing and health care is essential.
PubMed ID
12746005 View in PubMed
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Childbirth experiences of professional Chinese Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177236
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;33(6):748-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Angela Cooper Brathwaite
Charmaine C Williams
Author Affiliation
Durham Region Public Health Department, Whitby, Ontario, Canada. angela.cooperbrathwaite@utoronto.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;33(6):748-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric - ethnology
Midwifery - methods
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Parturition - ethnology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
To explore the connections between culture and expectations surrounding the childbirth experience for professional Chinese Canadian women.
Descriptive and qualitative, using ethnographic interview.
Women were recruited from a community health care center in metropolitan Toronto.
Six professional Chinese Canadian women who had experienced at least one childbirth.
The respondents described adherence to many traditional values, beliefs, and practices throughout the pregnancy and childbirth experience. However, some practices were modified to address functioning in a context that could not support full expression of cultural traditions. Recent immigration to Canada was associated with less adherence to traditional Chinese rituals and beliefs.
Nurses cannot make assumptions about who will use traditional cultural practices or about the circumstances in which they are relevant. Nurses need to be aware of cultural expectations so they can provide culturally competent care, but they should also be aware of how to engage in discussions to clarify individual patient priorities.
PubMed ID
15561663 View in PubMed
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Continuity and change: the interpretation of illness in an Anishinaabe (Ojibway) community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227884
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1990 Dec;14(4):417-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
L C Garro
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1990 Dec;14(4):417-54
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Causality
Cultural Characteristics
Humans
Indians, North American
Linguistics
Medicine, Traditional
Abstract
Rich descriptions of Anishinaabe medical knowledge and the cultural meanings associated with illness are available in the anthropological literature, especially in the writings of A.I. Hallowell. Most of this work is based on fieldwork carried out prior to 1940 and was often motivated by a desire to reconstruct the pre-contact situation. Since that time, there have been numerous changes affecting health status and health care. This paper examines lay medical knowledge in a contemporary Canadian Anishinaabeg community, with particular attention to change and continuity in the way people explain and respond to the occurrence of illness.
PubMed ID
2276267 View in PubMed
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Cultural and social acceptability of a healthy diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54991
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993 Aug;47(8):592-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
L. Holm
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993 Aug;47(8):592-9
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects - economics - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Life Style
Male
Nutrition - education
Nutritional Requirements
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Satiation
Social Values
Abstract
The extent to which the dietary practices recommended by nutrition science are compatible with an enjoyable lifestyle is a recurring theme in the debate on food and health in Denmark. The aim of this study was to see in practice what problems arise when ordinary people are confronted with a healthy diet. Fourteen of the participants in an 8 month dietary intervention study were interviewed about their opinions of, and experiences with, a diet composed in accordance with the Nordic nutrition recommendations. The interviews were qualitative, in depth and semistructured. The participants were interviewed twice, the first time towards the end of the intervention and again 3 months after the intervention ended. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. For the participants, who were young students with a relatively high knowledge of nutrition, practical experience of a recommended diet was a series of surprises: the amount of food, its similarity to modern Danish food culture, its palatability, and the relatively small amount of dairy products in the diet were contrary to participants expectations. Participants found the recommended diet pleasant to live on, but expected certain economical and practical difficulties in applying it to everyday life outside the intervention. Hunger and satiety sensations changed and became more distinct. The results of the study indicate suggestions relevant for both industrial product development and nutrition information to the public.
PubMed ID
8404795 View in PubMed
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Cultural and spiritual meanings of childbirth. Orthodox Jewish and Mormon women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199400
Source
J Holist Nurs. 1999 Sep;17(3):280-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
L C Callister
S. Semenic
J C Foster
Author Affiliation
Brigham Young University College of Nursing, USA.
Source
J Holist Nurs. 1999 Sep;17(3):280-95
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Christianity - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Jews - psychology
Labor, Obstetric - ethnology
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Pastoral Care
Pregnancy
Religion and Psychology
Women - psychology
Abstract
This descriptive, phenomenological study investigated the cultural and spiritual meanings of the childbirth experience from the personal perspectives of 30 Canadian Orthodox Jewish and 30 American Mormon women. Fewer Jewish women had childbirth education and attendance of their partners during childbirth than did Mormon women. Participants in the study, having codified belief systems, expressed the primary importance of bearing children in obedience to religious law. Birth was articulated as a bittersweet paradox, often accompanied by a sense of empowerment. Women described the importance of personal connectedness with others and with God, the importance of childbearing, and the spiritual and emotional dimensions of their childbirth experiences. Religious beliefs help women define the meaning of childbirth and may provide coping mechanisms for the intensity of giving birth. It is essential for holistic nurses to value and acknowledge the cultural and spiritual dimensions of the childbirth experience.
PubMed ID
10690070 View in PubMed
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Cultural differences and parental responses to the preterm infant at risk: strategies for supporting families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188501
Source
Neonatal Netw. 2002 Sep-Oct;21(6):31-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marianne Bracht
Anna Kandankery
Shelley Nodwell
Brenda Stade
Author Affiliation
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Perinatal Multicultural Interest Group, Mount Sinai Hospital, Room 775, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada. mbracht@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Neonatal Netw. 2002 Sep-Oct;21(6):31-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - nursing
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Maternal Behavior - ethnology
Neonatal Nursing - methods
Nurse's Role
Parents - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Risk assessment
Self-Help Groups
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - nursing
Abstract
Parenting a preterm infant at risk for developmental disabilities can be a profoundly stressful experience. For parents from minority cultures, language barriers and cultural differences can increase feelings of uncertainty and inability to cope. Research suggests that cultural differences influence not only parents' emotional responses to and perceptions of disability, but also their utilization of services and their interaction with health professionals. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH), Toronto, provides care to a culturally diverse community, and approximately 45 percent of patients receiving care represent minority ethnic groups. Although efforts to provide culturally sensitive care have been made, they have tended to be isolated initiatives lacking consistency and coordination. This article describes the initiation and development of a multicultural program at MSH to support families of infants at risk for developmental disabilities. This article provides valuable guidance to other neonatal units that are attempting to support parents from diverse cultural groups.
PubMed ID
12240512 View in PubMed
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Culturally based substance abuse treatment for American Indians/Alaska Natives and Latinos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270907
Source
J Ethn Subst Abuse. 2009;8(3):207-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Scott C Carvajal
Robert S Young
Source
J Ethn Subst Abuse. 2009;8(3):207-22
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Culturally Competent Care - organization & administration
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Minority Groups
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - therapy
United States
Notes
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PubMed ID
25985067 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.