Skip header and navigation

Refine By

39 records – page 1 of 4.

Acute pain and use of local anesthesia: tooth drilling and childbirth labor pain beliefs among Anglo-Americans, Chinese, and Scandinavians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52621
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Moore
I. Brødsgaard
T K Mao
M L Miller
S F Dworkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-6370, USA. roding@u.washington.edu
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia, Local - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Dental Cavity Preparation
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Taiwan
United States
Abstract
Differences in ethnic beliefs about the perceived need for local anesthesia for tooth drilling and childbirth labor were surveyed among Anglo-Americans, Mandarin Chinese, and Scandinavians (89 dentists and 251 patients) matched for age, gender, and occupation. Subjects matched survey questionnaire items selected from previously reported interview results to estimate (a) their beliefs about the possible use of anesthetic for tooth drilling and labor pain compared with other possible remedies and (b) the choice of pain descriptors associated with the use of nonuse of anesthetic, including descriptions of injection pain. Multidimensional scaling, Gamma, and Chi-square statistics as well as odds ratios and Spearman's correlations were employed in the analysis. Seventy-seven percent of American informants reported the use of anesthetics as possible remedies for drilling and 51% reported the use of anesthetics for labor pain compared with 34% that reported the use of anesthetics among Chinese for drilling and 5% for labor pain and 70% among Scandinavians for drilling and 35% for labor pain. Most Americans and Swedes described tooth-drilling sensations as sharp, most Chinese used descriptors such as sharp and "sourish" (suan), and most Danes used words like shooting (jagende). By rank, Americans described labor pain as cramping, sharp, and excruciating, Chinese used words like sharp, intermittent, and horrible, Danes used words like shooting, tiring, and sharp, and Swedes used words like tiring, "good," yet horrible. Preferred pain descriptors for drilling, birth, and injection pains varied significantly by ethnicity. Results corroborated conclusions of a qualitative study about pain beliefs in relation to perceived needs for anesthetic in tooth drilling. Samples used to obtain the results were estimated to approach qualitative representativity for these urban ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
9790007 View in PubMed
Less detail

American and Icelandic parents' perceptions of the health status of their young children with chronic asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15207
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Erla Kolbrun Svavarsdóttir
Mary Kay Rayens
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Faculty of Nursing, Eirbergi, Eiriksgata 34, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. eks@hi.is
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Asthma - prevention & control
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Welfare
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Cost of Illness
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Iceland
Male
Midwestern United States
Models, Psychological
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Workload
Abstract
PURPOSE: To identify factors that influence American and Icelandic parents' health perceptions among families of infants or young children with asthma. DESIGN: A cross-sectional research design of 76 American families and 103 Icelandic families. Data were collected mainly in the Midwest of the United States (US) and in Iceland from August 1996 through January 2000. METHOD: Parents in these two countries who had children aged 6 or younger with chronic asthma completed questionnaires regarding family demands, caregiving demands, family hardiness, sense of coherence, and health perceptions. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and t tests were compiled. Multiple regression analysis was used to test path models and for mediation. FINDINGS: American parents differed from their Icelandic counterparts in family hardiness. In both countries, significant differences were found in caregiving demands and health perceptions between mothers and fathers. Illness severity and caregiving demands affected health perceptions of both mothers and fathers. Sense of coherence mediated the relationship between family demands and parents' perceptions for both parents. For mothers only, family hardiness mediated the relationship between family demands and health perceptions. CONCLUSIONS: The Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation was useful for building knowledge on parents' health perceptions in two Western cultures for families of young children with asthma. Interventions emphasizing family and individual resiliency and strengths have the potential to affect parents' views of their children's health.
PubMed ID
14735678 View in PubMed
Less detail

An international comparative multicenter study of assessment of dental appearance using computer-aided image manipulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33734
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
G E Carlsson
I V Wagner
P. Odman
K. Ekstrand
M. MacEntee
C. Marinello
T. Nanami
R K Ow
H. Sato
C. Speer
J R Strub
T. Watanabe
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Göteborg University, Sweden. g_carlsson@odontologi.gu.se
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dental Technicians - psychology
Dentists - psychology
Esthetics, Dental - psychology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of the present investigation was to perform an international multicenter comparison of dental appearance as evaluated by dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants were drawn from three groups: 203 dentists, 197 dental technicians and 254 nondental subjects. The methods developed in a previous study in Sweden were applied again in seven centers located in six countries. A questionnaire, accompanied by five sets of computer-manipulated images portraying one man and one woman, was used to prompt and record responses to different aspects of dental appearance and function. RESULTS: The questionnaire revealed that both the dental appearance and function of teeth were important to most of the participants, but three quarters of the participants did indicate that good dental function was more important that esthetics. More women (30%) than men (18%), however, placed greater importance on appearance. Age or gender did not influence judgments of the computer-manipulated images, although judgments did vary greatly within the three groups and between the centers. Nonetheless, highly colored teeth were preferred more often by nondental subjects than by dentists or dental technicians. CONCLUSION: Computer-aided image manipulation shows promise as a method for investigating the significance of dental-related beliefs, especially those relating to esthetics, in different population groups. The evaluation of dental appearance and function in this study indicated that dental function is held in greater regard, and that the significance of dental appearance varies widely among dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects.
PubMed ID
9728119 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Attitude towards psychotherapy in the Russian population and in the population with a Russian/Soviet cultural background in Germany. A pilot study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175668
Source
Nervenarzt. 2006 Jan;77(1):64-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
D. Ditte
W. Schulz
G. Schmid-Ott
Author Affiliation
Institut für Psychologie, Technische Universität Braunschweig.
Source
Nervenarzt. 2006 Jan;77(1):64-72
Date
Jan-2006
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Psychotherapy
Questionnaires
Siberia - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We assumed that persons with a Russian/Soviet cultural background have a more skeptical attitude towards psychotherapy than persons with a German background because of the poor distribution of psychotherapy and the knowledge about this kind of treatment in Russia.
We compared the views of Russian probands (n=40), Russian migrants living in Germany (n=65) and German probands (n=70) with the "Questionnaire on Attitudes towards Psychotherapeutic Treatment" (QAPT). For the study of the Russian probands we translated the questionnaire into the Russian language.
The psychometric examination predominantly suggests the quality of the Russian version of the QAPT. Russian probands showed a more skeptical attitude towards psychotherapy compared to the German probands. The migrants had a tendentially more negative attitude than the Germans and a more positive attitude than the Russians. However, we could not determine any differences concerning the anticipated social acceptance regarding participation in psychotherapy.
The results suggest the relevance of culture-specific factors in psychotherapy and an increased need for information of persons with a Russian/Soviet cultural background about psychotherapy.
PubMed ID
15776258 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical factors, psycho-social stressors and sick-leave patterns in a group of Swedish and Greek patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73755
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1990 Jun;18(2):133-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
M. Löfvander
D. Papastavrou
Author Affiliation
Rinkeby Health Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1990 Jun;18(2):133-8
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Greece - ethnology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - ethnology - psychology - rehabilitation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - ethnology - rehabilitation
Sweden - epidemiology
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
To assess patterns of illness behaviour in immigrant Greeks, 50 Greek and 50 Swedish consecutive patients were examined by a Swedish general practitioner and a Greek psychotherapist at a primary health centre in Stockholm. In addition to a physical examination an overall psychiatric assessment of the patients was made, partly with the help of rating scales. Psycho-social stressors were also rated. In spite of modest somatic and psychiatric findings, the majority of the Greek patients had been on long-term sick-leave and none of them could be rehabilitated. This illness behaviour, with passivity as the most notable response to pain, was very evident in the Greek group and was assessed as being strongly related to psycho-social stressors as well as to iatrogenic damage. All of the patients whose sick-leave had been of short duration prior to their first visit to the health centre could be rehabilitated. Psycho-social counselling given to the Greek patients in their native tongue had only marginal effect.
PubMed ID
2367823 View in PubMed
Less detail

A cross-cultural study of gambling behaviour among adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165929
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2007 Mar;23(1):25-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Stephen Ellenbogen
Rina Gupta
Jeffrey L Derevensky
Author Affiliation
International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors, McGill University, 3724 McTavish Street, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Stephen.Ellenbogen@mcgill.ca
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2007 Mar;23(1):25-39
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Behavior, Addictive - diagnosis - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Impulse Control Disorders - epidemiology
Male
Peer Group
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk-Taking
Self Concept
Social Behavior
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study investigated whether the prevalence of weekly and problem gambling among youth varied according to cultural affiliation. A convenience sample of 1,265 Quebec high school students aged 12-18 was divided into three linguistic groupings: Anglophone (English), Francophone (French), and Allophone (other). Results revealed that the Allophone grouping contained the highest proportion of youth who gambled on a weekly basis and who reported gambling problems, followed by the Anglophone, and finally the Francophone groupings. Acculturation difficulties were associated with problem gambling. Few meaningful between-group differences were found with respect to factors related to problem gambling (i.e., comorbidity with other risk factors, coping, family functioning and resiliency). The results are discussed with respect to the influence of cultural background on gambling behavior.
PubMed ID
17191144 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cross-cultural study of symptom expectation following minor head injury in Canada and Greece.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192494
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2001 Dec;103(4):254-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
R. Ferrari
C. Constantoyannis
N. Papadakis
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Patras, Patras, Greece. rferrari@powersurfr.com
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2001 Dec;103(4):254-9
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Brain Injury, Chronic - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Craniocerebral Trauma - complications
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Greece - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of the present study is to compare the frequency and nature of expected symptoms in Greece (a country where the chronic post-concussive syndrome is largely unknown) with that in Canada.
A symptom checklist was administered to two subject groups selected from local companies in Patras, Greece, and Edmonton, Canada, respectively. Subjects were asked to imagine having suffered head trauma with loss of consciousness in a motor vehicle accident and to check off symptoms, they expected might arise from the injury. For symptoms they anticipated, they were asked to select the period of time they expected those symptoms to persist.
In both the Greek and Edmontonian groups, the pattern of symptoms anticipated closely resembled the acute symptoms commonly reported by accident victims with minor head injury. Yet, while many Edmontonians also anticipated symptoms to last months or years, very few Greek subjects selected any symptoms as being likely to persist in a chronic manner.
In Greece, despite the frequent experience of minor head injury in motor vehicle accidents, there is a very low rate of expectation of any chronic sequelae from such an injury, contrasting greatly with the response shown in Canada, where the prevalence of the chronic post-concussive syndrome is higher. Symptom expectation in some countries may be an important factor in the development of the chronic post-concussive syndrome.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2003 Apr;105(2):146-712691811
PubMed ID
11714575 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cultural differences and parental responses to the preterm infant at risk: strategies for supporting families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188501
Source
Neonatal Netw. 2002 Sep-Oct;21(6):31-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marianne Bracht
Anna Kandankery
Shelley Nodwell
Brenda Stade
Author Affiliation
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Perinatal Multicultural Interest Group, Mount Sinai Hospital, Room 775, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada. mbracht@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Neonatal Netw. 2002 Sep-Oct;21(6):31-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - nursing
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Maternal Behavior - ethnology
Neonatal Nursing - methods
Nurse's Role
Parents - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Risk assessment
Self-Help Groups
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - nursing
Abstract
Parenting a preterm infant at risk for developmental disabilities can be a profoundly stressful experience. For parents from minority cultures, language barriers and cultural differences can increase feelings of uncertainty and inability to cope. Research suggests that cultural differences influence not only parents' emotional responses to and perceptions of disability, but also their utilization of services and their interaction with health professionals. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH), Toronto, provides care to a culturally diverse community, and approximately 45 percent of patients receiving care represent minority ethnic groups. Although efforts to provide culturally sensitive care have been made, they have tended to be isolated initiatives lacking consistency and coordination. This article describes the initiation and development of a multicultural program at MSH to support families of infants at risk for developmental disabilities. This article provides valuable guidance to other neonatal units that are attempting to support parents from diverse cultural groups.
PubMed ID
12240512 View in PubMed
Less detail

39 records – page 1 of 4.