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American and Icelandic parents' perceptions of the health status of their young children with chronic asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15207
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Erla Kolbrun Svavarsdóttir
Mary Kay Rayens
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Faculty of Nursing, Eirbergi, Eiriksgata 34, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. eks@hi.is
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Asthma - prevention & control
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Welfare
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Cost of Illness
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Iceland
Male
Midwestern United States
Models, Psychological
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Workload
Abstract
PURPOSE: To identify factors that influence American and Icelandic parents' health perceptions among families of infants or young children with asthma. DESIGN: A cross-sectional research design of 76 American families and 103 Icelandic families. Data were collected mainly in the Midwest of the United States (US) and in Iceland from August 1996 through January 2000. METHOD: Parents in these two countries who had children aged 6 or younger with chronic asthma completed questionnaires regarding family demands, caregiving demands, family hardiness, sense of coherence, and health perceptions. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and t tests were compiled. Multiple regression analysis was used to test path models and for mediation. FINDINGS: American parents differed from their Icelandic counterparts in family hardiness. In both countries, significant differences were found in caregiving demands and health perceptions between mothers and fathers. Illness severity and caregiving demands affected health perceptions of both mothers and fathers. Sense of coherence mediated the relationship between family demands and parents' perceptions for both parents. For mothers only, family hardiness mediated the relationship between family demands and health perceptions. CONCLUSIONS: The Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation was useful for building knowledge on parents' health perceptions in two Western cultures for families of young children with asthma. Interventions emphasizing family and individual resiliency and strengths have the potential to affect parents' views of their children's health.
PubMed ID
14735678 View in PubMed
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An international comparative multicenter study of assessment of dental appearance using computer-aided image manipulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33734
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
G E Carlsson
I V Wagner
P. Odman
K. Ekstrand
M. MacEntee
C. Marinello
T. Nanami
R K Ow
H. Sato
C. Speer
J R Strub
T. Watanabe
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Göteborg University, Sweden. g_carlsson@odontologi.gu.se
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dental Technicians - psychology
Dentists - psychology
Esthetics, Dental - psychology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of the present investigation was to perform an international multicenter comparison of dental appearance as evaluated by dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants were drawn from three groups: 203 dentists, 197 dental technicians and 254 nondental subjects. The methods developed in a previous study in Sweden were applied again in seven centers located in six countries. A questionnaire, accompanied by five sets of computer-manipulated images portraying one man and one woman, was used to prompt and record responses to different aspects of dental appearance and function. RESULTS: The questionnaire revealed that both the dental appearance and function of teeth were important to most of the participants, but three quarters of the participants did indicate that good dental function was more important that esthetics. More women (30%) than men (18%), however, placed greater importance on appearance. Age or gender did not influence judgments of the computer-manipulated images, although judgments did vary greatly within the three groups and between the centers. Nonetheless, highly colored teeth were preferred more often by nondental subjects than by dentists or dental technicians. CONCLUSION: Computer-aided image manipulation shows promise as a method for investigating the significance of dental-related beliefs, especially those relating to esthetics, in different population groups. The evaluation of dental appearance and function in this study indicated that dental function is held in greater regard, and that the significance of dental appearance varies widely among dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects.
PubMed ID
9728119 View in PubMed
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[Attitudes and subjective norms of Quebecian adolescent mothers towards breastfeeding].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189904
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 May-Jun;93(3):198-202
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lise Ross
Céline Goulet
Author Affiliation
Collège du Vieux-Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 May-Jun;93(3):198-202
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Feeding - ethnology - psychology
Child
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Mothers - psychology
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
To describe the attitudes and subjective norms of female adolescents toward breastfeeding, and to determine whether these are influenced by age, education level, mother tongue, place of birth, exposure to breastfeeding and intention to breastfeed their children.
236 female adolescents, from four schools randomly selected among those offering education levels from secondary 1 to V 4, answered a questionnaire based on the theory of reasoned action.
Female adolescents showed overall positive attitudes towards breastfeeding, but negative subjective norms. Older girls who were breastfed as infants and who originated from foreign countries showed the most positive attitudes towards breastfeeding.
Even though adolescent girls showed overall positive attitudes, several were unable to make up their mind. This result could be attributed to a lack of knowledge and low exposure to breastfeeding mothers. The school system plays an important role in health promotion and should expose all students to the art of breastfeeding through its health classes.
PubMed ID
12050987 View in PubMed
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Disclosure of medical error to parents and paediatric patients: assessment of parents' attitudes and influencing factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147065
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2010 Apr;95(4):286-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
A G Matlow
L. Moody
R. Laxer
P. Stevens
C. Goia
J N Friedman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. anne.matlow@sickkids.ca
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2010 Apr;95(4):286-90
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Ethics, Medical
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Errors - ethics - psychology
Middle Aged
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Patient Rights - ethics
Pediatrics - ethics
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Truth Disclosure - ethics
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess parental preferences for medical error disclosure and evaluate associated factors.
Prospective survey.
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.
Parents of inpatients and outpatients.
Anonymous questionnaire administered on May to August 2006, surveying demographic characteristics and identifying parents' thresholds for disclosure using a vignette with six levels of harm.
Preferred thresholds for parent and patient disclosure and associated factors.
99% of 431 parents (181 inpatients, 250 outpatients) wanted disclosure if there was potential or actual harm versus 77% if there was none (por= 11 years (p
PubMed ID
19948514 View in PubMed
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Educating families from ethnic minorities in type 1 diabetes-experiences from a Danish intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29387
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Nov;59(2):164-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Lene Povlsen
Birthe Olsen
Steen Ladelund
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Glostrup University Hospital, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. Lpovlsen@image.dk
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Nov;59(2):164-70
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Communication Barriers
Cultural Diversity
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - ethnology - metabolism - prevention & control
Educational Measurement
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Hospitals, University
Humans
Islam - psychology
Male
Minority Groups - education - psychology
Needs Assessment
Parents - education - psychology
Patient Education - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Ethnic minorities may constitute vulnerable groups within Western health care systems as their ability to master severe chronic diseases could be affected by barriers such as different culture and health/illness beliefs, communication problems and limited educational background. An intervention focusing on immigrant families with children with type 1 diabetes is described. The intervention included the development of adapted educational material and guidelines, and a subsequent re-education of children, adolescents and parents from 37 families. The study demonstrated that it was possible to improve health outcome. During the study, the knowledge of diabetes increased, but with considerable differences between the families. HbA(1c) also decreased significantly during the intervention, but increased during follow-up. The paper discusses possible explanations and suggestions for optimising education and calls for new projects where ethnic minorities are active participants in the development of appropriate educational programs and material.
PubMed ID
16257621 View in PubMed
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Experiences of the Swedish healthcare system: an interview study with refugees in need of long-term health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136239
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):319-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Monireh Farsi Razavi
Lars Falk
Åke Björn
Susan Wilhelmsson
Author Affiliation
The International Medical Program, Linköping, Sweden. monireh.farsi.razavi@lio.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):319-25
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Chronic Disease - psychology - therapy
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Diversity
Delivery of Health Care
Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Refugees - psychology
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
Refugees needing long-term health care must adapt to new healthcare systems. The aim of this study was to examine the viewpoints of nine refugees in a county in Sweden, with a known chronic disease or functional impairment requiring long-term medical care, on their contacts with care providers regarding treatment and personal needs.
Semi-structured interviews with nine individuals and/or their next of kin. Inductive content analysis was used to identify experiences.
''Care organisations/resources'' and ''professional competence'' were the categories extracted. Participants felt cared for due to accessibility to and regular appointments with the same care provider. Visiting different clinics contributed to a negative experience and lack of trust. The staff 's interest in participants' lives and health contributed to a sense of professionalism. Most participants said the problems experienced were not related to their backgrounds as refugees. Many patients did not fully understand which clinic they were attending or the purpose of the care that the specific clinic provided. Some lacked knowledge of their disease.
Health care was perceived as equal to other Swedish citizens and problems experienced were not explained by refugee backgrounds. Lack of information from care providers and being sent to various levels of care created feelings of a lack of overall medical responsibility.
PubMed ID
21398334 View in PubMed
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Field research with underserved minorities: the ideal and the real.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174452
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2 Suppl 3):iii56-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Arlene Rubin Stiffman
Stacey Freedenthal
Eddie Brown
Emily Ostmann
Patricia Hibbeler
Author Affiliation
The George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Comorbidity and Addictions Center, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA. arstiff@wustl.edu
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2 Suppl 3):iii56-66
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Behavioral Research - methods
Child
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Culture
Health Services Research - methods
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Medically underserved area
Minority Groups
Research Design
Southwestern United States
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Abstract
The realities of doing field research with high-risk, minority, or indigenous populations may be quite different than the guidelines presented in research training. There are overlapping and competing demands created by cultural and research imperatives. A National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)-funded study of American Indian youth illustrates competing pressures between research objectives and cultural sensitivity. This account of the problems that were confronted and the attempts made to resolve them will hopefully fill a needed gap in the research literature and serve as a thought-provoking example for other researchers. This study built cross-cultural bridges. Researchers worked as a team with stakeholders to modify the instruments and methods to achieve cultural appropriateness. The researchers agreed to the communities' demands for increased service access and rights of refusal for all publications and presentations. Data indicate that these compromises did not substantially harm the first year of data collection completeness or the well-being of the youth. To the contrary, it enhanced the ability to disseminate results to those community leaders with the most vested interests. The conflicts between ideal research requirements and cultural demands confronted by the researchers and interviewers in the American Indian community were not necessarily different from issues faced by researchers in other communities. Of major import is the recognition that there are no easy answers to such issues within research.
Notes
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2000 Aug;39(8):1032-910939232
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2001 Aug;52(8):1088-9411474056
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Jul;92(7):1067-7012084680
Cites: Am Psychol. 2002 Dec;57(12):1024-4012613155
Cites: Ethics Behav. 2003;13(4):303-3215000093
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2004 Summer;34(2):160-7115191272
Cites: Int J Addict. 1990-1991;25(5A-6A):655-852101397
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1996 Oct;64(5):856-608916611
Cites: Addict Behav. 2005 Jun;30(5):889-90415893087
Cites: Ethics Behav. 2005;15(1):1-1416127856
PubMed ID
15933332 View in PubMed
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Focus groups of Y-K Delta Alaska Natives: attitudes toward tobacco use and tobacco dependence interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3435
Source
Prev Med. 2004 Apr;38(4):421-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Caroline C Renner
Christi A Patten
Carrie Enoch
John Petraitis
Kenneth P Offord
Sarah Angstman
Andrew Garrison
Caroline Nevak
Ivana T Croghan
Richard D Hurt
Author Affiliation
Yukon--Kuskokwim Health Corporation, Bethel, AK, USA.
Source
Prev Med. 2004 Apr;38(4):421-31
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Perception
Population Groups - psychology
Pregnancy
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Tobacco Use Cessation - ethnology - psychology
Tobacco Use Disorder - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Tobacco dependence interventions developed for Alaska Natives are virtually nonexistent. Alaska Natives residing on the Yukon-Kuskokwim (Y--K) Delta in southwestern Alaska use a unique form of smokeless tobacco (ST) known as Iqmik. This study employed focus group methodology to explore attitudes toward tobacco use and tobacco dependence interventions among Alaska Natives residing on the Y-K Delta. METHODS: Twelve focus groups of former and current tobacco users were conducted in four villages in the Y-K Delta. Participants were 35 adults (83% female) and 22 adolescents (27% female). Participants completed a brief demographic and tobacco use history form. Statements from the focus groups were transcribed for content coding and analysis of the major themes. RESULTS: Use of Iqmik in the villages is thought to be ubiquitous. Y-K Delta Alaska Natives are introduced to Iqmik at a very young age. Iqmik is mostly used and prepared by young Alaska Natives and adult women. There are few perceived adverse health effects of Iqmik or other tobacco use. Although there is interest in stopping, there is a perceived lack of availability of tobacco dependence interventions. The major barriers to preventing the initiation of and stopping tobacco use are the social acceptance and widespread use and availability of tobacco. CONCLUSION: The attitudes toward tobacco and identified barriers to stopping will be useful in developing tobacco dependence interventions for Alaska Natives.
PubMed ID
15020175 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.