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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal urbanization and rights in Canada: examining implications for health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115712
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Laura C Senese
Kathi Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography & Program in Planning, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 5047, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, Canada. laura.senese@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Status Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Urban Health - ethnology
Urbanization
Young Adult
Abstract
Urbanization among Indigenous peoples is growing globally. This has implications for the assertion of Indigenous rights in urban areas, as rights are largely tied to land bases that generally lie outside of urban areas. Through their impacts on the broader social determinants of health, the links between Indigenous rights and urbanization may be related to health. Focusing on a Canadian example, this study explores relationships between Indigenous rights and urbanization, and the ways in which they are implicated in the health of urban Indigenous peoples living in Toronto, Canada. In-depth interviews focused on conceptions of and access to Aboriginal rights in the city, and perceived links with health, were conduced with 36 Aboriginal people who had moved to Toronto from a rural/reserve area. Participants conceived of Aboriginal rights largely as the rights to specific services/benefits and to respect for Aboriginal cultures/identities. There was a widespread perception among participants that these rights are not respected in Canada, and that this is heightened when living in an urban area. Disrespect for Aboriginal rights was perceived to negatively impact health by way of social determinants of health (e.g., psychosocial health impacts of discrimination experienced in Toronto). The paper discusses the results in the context of policy implications and future areas of research.
PubMed ID
23474122 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and sexual function in Asian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171478
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Lori A Brotto
Heather M Chik
Andrew G Ryder
Boris B Gorzalka
Brooke N Seal
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gyneacology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Lori.Brotto@vch.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Cultural effects on sexuality are pervasive and potentially of great clinical importance, but have not yet received sustained empirical attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of acculturation on sexual permissiveness and sexual function, with a particular focus on arousal in Asian women living in Canada. We also compared questionnaire responses between Asian and Euro-Canadian groups in hopes of investigating whether acculturation captured unique information not predicted by ethnic group affiliation. Euro-Canadian (n = 173) and Asian (n = 176) female university students completed a battery of questionnaires in private. Euro-Canadian women had significantly more sexual knowledge and experiences, more liberal attitudes, and higher rates of desire, arousal, sexual receptivity, and sexual pleasure. Anxiety from anticipated sexual activity was significantly higher in Asian women, but the groups did not differ significantly on relationship satisfaction or problems with sexual function. Acculturation to Western culture, as well as maintained affiliation with traditional Asian heritage, were both significantly and independently related to sexual attitudes above and beyond length of residency in Canada, and beyond ethnic group comparisons. Overall, these data suggest that measurement of acculturation may capture information about an individual's unique acculturation pattern that is not evident when focusing solely on ethnic group comparisons or length of residency, and that such findings may be important in facilitating the assessment, classification, and treatment of sexual difficulties in Asian women.
PubMed ID
16362246 View in PubMed
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The artistry and ability of traditional women healers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185389
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. strut005@tc.umn.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Role
United States
Abstract
In a phenomenological research study with a purposeful sample, 6 Ojibwa and Cree indigenous women healers from Canada and the United States shared their experience of being a traditional healer. Using stories obtained during open-ended, unstructured interviews, in this article I depict the lives, backgrounds, and traditional healing practices of women who, in the past, have not been afforded an opportunity to dialogue about their healing art and abilities. The methods of these women healers, their arts and their gifts, are different from those of Western conventional medicine because of dissimilar world views related to health and illness. An increased awareness of health care providers related to the ancient art of traditional healing currently practiced in communities by gifted women who provide culturally specific holistic healing and health care is essential.
PubMed ID
12746005 View in PubMed
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Canadian Aboriginal people's experiences with HIV/AIDS as portrayed in selected English language Aboriginal media (1996-2000).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175886
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 May;60(10):2169-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Juanne N Clarke
Daniela B Friedman
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology; Anthropology, Wilfrid Laurier University, 75 University Avenue, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3C5. jclarke@wlu.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 May;60(10):2169-80
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - etiology - prevention & control
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Bibliometrics
Canada
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Newspapers
Public Opinion
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Spirituality
Stereotyping
Abstract
This paper describes the portrayal of HIV/AIDS in 14 mass print newspapers directed towards the Canadian Aboriginal population and published between 1996 and 2000. Based on qualitative content analysis the research examines both manifest and latent meanings. Manifest results of this study indicate that women and youth are under represented as persons with HIV/AIDS. The latent results note the frequent references to Aboriginal culture, and the political and economic position of Aboriginal Canadians when discussing the disease, the person with the disease, the fear of the disease and the reaction of the community to the person with the disease. Unlike mainstream media where the medical frame is dominant, HIV/AIDS are here contextualized by culture, identity, spirituality and political-economic issues.
PubMed ID
15748666 View in PubMed
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Canadian First Nations women's beliefs about pregnancy and prenatal care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216537
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1995;27(1):89-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
E H Sokoloski
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1995;27(1):89-100
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Pregnancy - psychology
Prenatal Care - utilization
Questionnaires
Abstract
Evidence links adequate prenatal care to improved birth outcomes. Research, however, indicates that First Nations women do not attend regularly for prenatal care. In the current study, seven informants, representing three First Nations tribes, were extensively interviewed to examine their beliefs about pregnancy and participation in prenatal care. First Nations women conceptualized pregnancy in a spiritual context and believed it to be a healthy, natural process requiring no intervention. Since they believed they were responsible for "taking care of themselves" during pregnancy, cultural practices that were thought to promote a healthy pregnancy were espoused. First Nations women were reportedly often dissatisfied with health-care providers in prenatal clinics. Their expectations of freely offered explanations and a friendly non-authoritarian approach were often not realized and their beliefs about pregnancy were in conflict with those of health-care providers. Barriers to prenatal care might be reduced by improving communication and providing holistic culture-specific care.
PubMed ID
7621378 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childbearing beliefs among Low-German-speaking Mennonite women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153138
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2008 Dec;55(4):420-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Judith C Kulig
Margaret Wall
Shirley Hill
Ruth Babcock
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, Canada. kulig@uleth.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2008 Dec;55(4):420-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Competency
Cultural Diversity
Emigration and Immigration
Family Planning Services
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Germany - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Mexico
Middle Aged
Multilingualism
Nursing Methodology Research
Parturition - ethnology
Postnatal Care - psychology
Prenatal Care
Protestantism - psychology
Questionnaires
Women - education - psychology
Abstract
Low-German-speaking (LGS) Mennonites are a conservative religious group that has migrated from Eastern Europe to Canada and then to countries such as Mexico. They are now returning to Canada in large numbers. They adhere to religious principles based upon a literal interpretation of the Bible. This conservative religious group provides opportunities for nurses and midwives to implement culturally competent care.
The purpose of this article is to discuss LGS Mennonite women's childbearing knowledge and beliefs to develop and implement care that considers and includes their conservative religious beliefs.
An exploratory, descriptive study was conducted to generate information through open-ended interviews with 38 LGS Mennonite women about their knowledge, beliefs and practices related to childbearing. Data collection and analysis occurred simultaneously; emerging themes were discussed by the research team to ensure a contextual understanding of the data.
The participants engage in proscribed practices ('turning the baby') and adhere to specific dietary measures (increasing dairy products) during pregnancy to ensure a healthy birth outcome. During the post-partum, extensive support is provided by other Mennonite women to assist the mother and newborn during this important transition.
Building trust and working in a respectful manner with religious groups such as the LGS Mennonites are a cornerstone of culturally competent nursing practice.
PubMed ID
19146553 View in PubMed
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Continuity and change: the interpretation of illness in an Anishinaabe (Ojibway) community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227884
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1990 Dec;14(4):417-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
L C Garro
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1990 Dec;14(4):417-54
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Causality
Cultural Characteristics
Humans
Indians, North American
Linguistics
Medicine, Traditional
Abstract
Rich descriptions of Anishinaabe medical knowledge and the cultural meanings associated with illness are available in the anthropological literature, especially in the writings of A.I. Hallowell. Most of this work is based on fieldwork carried out prior to 1940 and was often motivated by a desire to reconstruct the pre-contact situation. Since that time, there have been numerous changes affecting health status and health care. This paper examines lay medical knowledge in a contemporary Canadian Anishinaabeg community, with particular attention to change and continuity in the way people explain and respond to the occurrence of illness.
PubMed ID
2276267 View in PubMed
Less detail

47 records – page 1 of 5.