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Being different and vulnerable: experiences of immigrant African women who have been circumcised and sought maternity care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63115
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Vanja Berggren
Staffan Bergström
Anna-Karin Edberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):50-7
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa, Eastern - ethnology
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Circumcision, Female - ethnology - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Maternal Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Professional-Patient Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to explore the encounters with the health care system in Sweden of women from Somalia, Eritrea, and Sudan who have been genitally cut. A qualitative study was performed through interviews with 22 women originally from Somalia, Sudan, and Eritrea who were living in Sweden. The women experienced being different and vulnerable, suffering from being abandoned and mutilated, and they felt exposed in the encounter with the Swedish health care personnel and tried to adapt to a new cultural context. The results of this study indicate a need for more individualized, culturally adjusted care and support and a need for systematic education about female genital cutting for Swedish health care workers.
PubMed ID
16410436 View in PubMed
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Big changes in the Indian Health Service: are nurses aware?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192011
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2002 Jan;13(1):47-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Patricia A Holkup
Author Affiliation
University of Iowa College of Nursing, USA.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2002 Jan;13(1):47-53
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Consumer Participation
Cost Control
Cultural Diversity
Decision Making, Organizational
Forecasting
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Managed Care Programs - organization & administration
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment
Nurses - psychology
Transcultural Nursing
United States
United States Indian Health Service - organization & administration
Abstract
Unparalleled challenges currently face the Native American health care system. These challenges are a result of several factors, including (a) external pressures to reduce the overall cost of health care in the United States, (b) increased assumption of responsibility for delivery of health care by tribal governments, (c) decreased direct supervision by the Indian Health Service (IHS), (d) insufficient funding for Indian health care, and (e) increased interest of managed care to contract with tribal service units for health care. This article explores the opportunities and challenges facing Native American health care delivery and examines nursing policy issues pertinent to the current state of the IHS.
PubMed ID
11776015 View in PubMed
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Cultural challenges in end-of-life care: reflections from focus groups' interviews with hospice staff in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72205
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Mar;31(3):623-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
S. Ekblad
A. Marttila
M. Emilsson
Author Affiliation
Unit for Immigrant Environment and Health, National Swedish Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden. solvig.ekblad@ipm.ki.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Mar;31(3):623-30
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospice Care - psychology
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Cultural challenges in end-of-life care: reflections from focus groups' interviews with hospice staff in Stockholm During the past few decades, Swedish society has changed from a society with a few ethnic groups to one with over a hundred groups of different ethnic backgrounds, languages and religions. As society is becoming increasingly multicultural, cultural issues are also becoming an important feature in health care, particularly in end-of-life care where the questions of existential nature are of great importance. However, cultural issues in health care, especially at hospices, have not been studied sufficiently in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to gather reflections about cultural issues among hospice staff after a 3-day seminar in multicultural end-of-life care, by using a qualitative focus groups method. The 19 participants (majority nurses) were divided into three groups, one per hospice unit. A discussion guide was developed with the following themes: 1) post-training experiences of working with patients with multicultural background; 2) experiences gained by participating in the course of multicultural end-of-life care; 3) post-training reflections about one's own culture; 4) ideas or thoughts regarding work with patients from other cultures arising from the training; and 5) the need for further training in multicultural end-of-life care. One of the study's main findings was that to better understand other cultures it is important to raise awareness about the staff's own culture and to pay attention to culture especially in the context of the individual. The findings from focus groups provide insight regarding the need for planning flexible training in cultural issues to match the needs of the staff at the hospice units studied.
PubMed ID
10718882 View in PubMed
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Diabetes education materials: recommendations of tribal leaders, Indian health professionals, and American Indian community members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198131
Source
Diabetes Educ. 2000 Mar-Apr;26(2):290-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Y D Roubideaux
K. Moore
C. Avery
B. Muneta
M. Knight
D. Buchwald
Author Affiliation
Center for Native American Health, University of Arizona, Tucson 85724, USA. yvetter@u.arizona.edu
Source
Diabetes Educ. 2000 Mar-Apr;26(2):290-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - prevention & control
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Program Evaluation
Teaching Materials - standards
United States
Abstract
The Association of American Indian Physicians, the only national organization of its kind, conducted a series of focus groups to gather input from tribal leaders, Indian health professionals, and American Indian community members to guide the development of culturally appropriate diabetes education materials for the National Diabetes Education Program.
During the focus groups, participants shared their experiences with and recommendations for a variety of diabetes education materials.
Overall, 95% of participants expressed a strong preference for diabetes education materials relevant to their specific tribe or culture.
Recommendations from these focus groups were used to develop a national diabetes education campaign for American Indian communities.
PubMed ID
10865594 View in PubMed
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Experiences of the Swedish healthcare system: an interview study with refugees in need of long-term health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136239
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):319-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Monireh Farsi Razavi
Lars Falk
Åke Björn
Susan Wilhelmsson
Author Affiliation
The International Medical Program, Linköping, Sweden. monireh.farsi.razavi@lio.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):319-25
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Chronic Disease - psychology - therapy
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Diversity
Delivery of Health Care
Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Refugees - psychology
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
Refugees needing long-term health care must adapt to new healthcare systems. The aim of this study was to examine the viewpoints of nine refugees in a county in Sweden, with a known chronic disease or functional impairment requiring long-term medical care, on their contacts with care providers regarding treatment and personal needs.
Semi-structured interviews with nine individuals and/or their next of kin. Inductive content analysis was used to identify experiences.
''Care organisations/resources'' and ''professional competence'' were the categories extracted. Participants felt cared for due to accessibility to and regular appointments with the same care provider. Visiting different clinics contributed to a negative experience and lack of trust. The staff 's interest in participants' lives and health contributed to a sense of professionalism. Most participants said the problems experienced were not related to their backgrounds as refugees. Many patients did not fully understand which clinic they were attending or the purpose of the care that the specific clinic provided. Some lacked knowledge of their disease.
Health care was perceived as equal to other Swedish citizens and problems experienced were not explained by refugee backgrounds. Lack of information from care providers and being sent to various levels of care created feelings of a lack of overall medical responsibility.
PubMed ID
21398334 View in PubMed
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Foreign-born and Swedish-born families' perceptions of psychosis care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90548
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Feb;18(1):62-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Hultsjö Sally
Berterö Carina
Hjelm Katarina
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden. sallyhultsjo@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Feb;18(1):62-71
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Communication Barriers
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Competency
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Europe - ethnology
Family - ethnology - psychology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Middle East - ethnology
Nursing Methodology Research
Prejudice
Professional-Family Relations
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Sweden
Vietnam - ethnology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe how foreign-born and Swedish born families living in Sweden perceive psychosis care. Eleven foreign-born and 15 Swedish-born family members were interviewed and the data were analyzed using a phenomenographic approach. The findings showed three main descriptive categories: taking responsibility, access to care, and attitudes to psychosis. The degree of responsibility in the family decreased if there was easy access to care and support from health-care staff. Knowledge of psychosis was considered to be important in order to counteract prejudiced attitudes in the family and the community. Foreign-born families did not want to be treated differently from Swedes and stressed the importance of finding ways to communicate despite communication barriers. Foreign-born families also were affected by their experiences of psychiatric care and different beliefs about psychosis in their home country. The results indicate how important it is that health-care staff members treat families on equal terms. It is necessary to take the time to identify how to communicate in a good manner and to identify families' previous experiences of and beliefs about psychosis care in order to help families face prejudice in society and to see beyond the psychosis.
PubMed ID
19125788 View in PubMed
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God at work. Attitude overhaul in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190875
Source
J Christ Nurs. 1999;16(4):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999

Immigrants in emergency care: Swedish health care staff's experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51794
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2005 Dec;52(4):276-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
S. Hultsjö
K. Hjelm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden. sallyhultsjo@hotmail.com
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2005 Dec;52(4):276-85
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Clinical Competence
Communication Barriers
Cultural Diversity
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Focus Groups
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Refugees
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: During the past few decades Sweden has developed into a multicultural society. The proportion of patients with different cultural backgrounds increases, which naturally makes new demands on health care staff. AIM: To identify whether staff in somatic and psychiatric emergency care experienced problems in the care of migrants, and if so to compare these. METHOD: The study design was explorative. Focus group interviews of 22 women and 13 men working as nurses and assistant nurses at an emergency ward, an ambulance service and a psychiatric intensive care unit were held. FINDINGS: The results showed that the main problems experienced in all wards were difficulties related to caring for asylum-seeking refugees. Some dissimilarities were revealed: unexpected behaviours in migrants related to cultural differences described by staff working in the emergency ward; migrants' refusal to eat and drink and their inactive behaviour in the psychiatric ward; and a lot of non-emergency runs by the ambulance staff because of language barriers between the emergency services centre and migrants. CONCLUSION: The main problems experienced by the health care staff were situations in which they were confronted with the need to care for asylum-seeking refugees. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: These emphasize the importance of support from organizational structures and national policies to develop models for caring for asylum-seeking refugees. Simple routines and facilities to communicate with foreign-language-speaking migrants need to be developed. Health care staff need a deeper understanding of individual needs in the light of migrational and cultural background.
PubMed ID
16238724 View in PubMed
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Indigenous ethnic minorities and palliative care: exploring the views of Irish Travellers and palliative care staff.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160779
Source
Palliat Med. 2007 Oct;21(7):635-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Regina McQuillan
Onja Van Doorslaer
Author Affiliation
St Francis Hospice, Raheny, Dublin, Ireland. rmcquillan@sfh.ie
Source
Palliat Med. 2007 Oct;21(7):635-41
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - ethnology
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Hospices
Humans
Ireland - ethnology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Palliative Care - psychology - utilization
Terminal Care - psychology - utilization
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Indigenous people are among the ethnic minorities who encounter palliative care services. This research shows that Irish Travellers have little experience of specialist palliative care and that specialist palliative care providers have little knowledge or experience of Irish Travellers. Characteristics of Irish Travellers culture including the importance of hope, avoidance of open acknowledgment of death, the importance of family and the avoidance of the place of death (including moving away or burning caravans where death has occurred) challenge the provision of specialist palliative care. Individualisation of patient care, a feature of specialist palliative care can help staff provide appropriate care.
PubMed ID
17942504 View in PubMed
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Is it racism? Skepticism and resistance towards ethnic minority care workers among older care recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84546
Source
J Gerontol Soc Work. 2007;49(4):79-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Jönson Håkan
Author Affiliation
National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life (NISAL), Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden. hakjo@ituf.liu.se
Source
J Gerontol Soc Work. 2007;49(4):79-96
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Caregivers - classification - psychology
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Health Services for the Aged - manpower
Home Health Aides - classification - psychology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Minority Groups - psychology
Prejudice
Social Perception
Sweden
Abstract
The study investigates the occurrence and character of skepticism and resistance towards ethnic minority care workers among older care recipients in a municipality in Sweden. Twelve representatives of caregiver organizations were interviewed about their experience of this phenomenon. Three additional interviews were conducted with ethnic minority care workers. Representatives described the problem as rare and mostly occurring as language difficulties or as a temporary problem characterized as a fear of the unknown among some care recipients. They tended to apply a pragmatic or pathologizing approach when talking about causes of and solutions to the problem. These approaches enabled care providers to comply with "potential racism" without challenging an official ideology of anti-racism. In contrast, staff of foreign descent described the problem as more frequent and severe, particularly for short-term employees who experience many first-time encounters with care recipients.
PubMed ID
17953063 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.