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Chinese immigrants' management of their cardiovascular disease risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163328
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2007 Nov;29(7):804-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Kathryn M King
Pamela LeBlanc
William Carr
Hude Quan
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Canada. kingk@ucalgary.ca
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2007 Nov;29(7):804-26
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - education - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
China - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Care - methods - psychology
Sex Factors
Social Identification
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The authors have undertaken a series of grounded theory studies to describe and explain how ethnocultural affiliation and gender influence the process that cardiac patients undergo when faced with making behavior changes associated with reducing their cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Data were collected through audiorecorded semistructured interviews (using an interpreter as necessary), and the authors analyzed the data using constant comparative methods. The core variable that emerged through the series of studies was "meeting the challenge." Here, the authors describe the findings from a sample of Chinese immigrants (10 men, 5 women) to Canada. The process of managing CVD risk for the Chinese immigrants was characterized by their extraordinary diligence in seeking multiple sources of information to enable them to manage their health.
PubMed ID
17526869 View in PubMed
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First Nations people's challenge in managing coronary artery disease risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160905
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Oct;17(8):1074-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Kathryn M King
Julianne Sanguins
Lisa McGregor
Pamela LeBlanc
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Oct;17(8):1074-87
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Artery Disease - ethnology - prevention & control
Culture
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
First Nations peoples bring a particular history and cultural perspective to healing and well-being that significantly influences their health behaviors. The authors used grounded theory methods to describe and explain how ethnocultural affiliation and gender influence the process that 22 First Nations people underwent when making lifestyle changes related to their coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The transcribed interviews revealed a core variable, meeting the challenge. Meeting the challenge of CAD risk management was influenced by intrapersonal, interpersonal (relationships with others), extrapersonal (i.e., the community and government), sociodemographic, and gendered factors. Salient elements for the participants included their beliefs about origins of illness, the role of family, challenges to accessing information, financial and resource management, and the gendered element of body image. Health care providers need to understand the historical, social, and culturally embedded factors that influence First Nations people's appraisal of their CAD.
PubMed ID
17928480 View in PubMed
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