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Foreign-born and Swedish-born families' perceptions of psychosis care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90548
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Feb;18(1):62-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Hultsjö Sally
Berterö Carina
Hjelm Katarina
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden. sallyhultsjo@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Feb;18(1):62-71
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Communication Barriers
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Competency
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Europe - ethnology
Family - ethnology - psychology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Middle East - ethnology
Nursing Methodology Research
Prejudice
Professional-Family Relations
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Sweden
Vietnam - ethnology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe how foreign-born and Swedish born families living in Sweden perceive psychosis care. Eleven foreign-born and 15 Swedish-born family members were interviewed and the data were analyzed using a phenomenographic approach. The findings showed three main descriptive categories: taking responsibility, access to care, and attitudes to psychosis. The degree of responsibility in the family decreased if there was easy access to care and support from health-care staff. Knowledge of psychosis was considered to be important in order to counteract prejudiced attitudes in the family and the community. Foreign-born families did not want to be treated differently from Swedes and stressed the importance of finding ways to communicate despite communication barriers. Foreign-born families also were affected by their experiences of psychiatric care and different beliefs about psychosis in their home country. The results indicate how important it is that health-care staff members treat families on equal terms. It is necessary to take the time to identify how to communicate in a good manner and to identify families' previous experiences of and beliefs about psychosis care in order to help families face prejudice in society and to see beyond the psychosis.
PubMed ID
19125788 View in PubMed
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Perceptions of psychiatric care among foreign- and Swedish-born people with psychotic disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87639
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2007 Nov;60(3):279-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Hultsjö Sally
Berterö Carina
Hjelm Katarina
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden. sallyhultsjo@hotmail.com
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2007 Nov;60(3):279-88
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Perception
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychotic Disorders - nursing - psychology
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Abstract
AIM: This paper is a report of a study to explore different perceptions of psychiatric care among foreign- and Swedish-born people with psychotic disorders. BACKGROUND: Research from different countries reports a high-incidence of psychosis among migrants. The risk-factors discussed are social disadvantages in the new country. To understand and meet the needs of people from different countries, their perspective of psychiatric care must be illuminated and taken into consideration. METHOD: A phenomenographic study was conducted in 2005-2006 using semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of 12 foreign-born people and 10 Swedish-born people with psychosis. FINDINGS: Three categories were identified: personal and family involvement in care; relating to healthcare staff; and managing illness and everyday life. Foreign-born people differed from Swedish-born people in that they struggled to attain an everyday life in Sweden, relied on healthcare staff as experts in making decisions, and had religious beliefs about mental illness. Among Swedish-born people, the need for more support to relatives and help to perform recreational activities was important. CONCLUSION: It is important to identify individual perceptions and needs, which may be influenced by cultural origins, when caring for patients with psychosis. Previous experience of care, different ways of relating to staff, and individual needs should be identified and met with respect. Social needs should not be medicalized but taken into consideration when planning care, which illustrates the importance of multi-professional co-operation.
PubMed ID
17822426 View in PubMed
Less detail