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The experience of native peer facilitators in the campaign against type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185829
Source
J Rural Health. 2003;19(2):174-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Felicia Schanche Hodge
Lorelei De Cora
Betty Geishirt-Cantrell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis 55455, USA. strut005@umn.edu
Source
J Rural Health. 2003;19(2):174-80
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Career Choice
Community Health Workers - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - prevention & control
Female
Health promotion
Health Services, Indigenous - manpower
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Nebraska
Peer Group
Qualitative Research
Rural Health
South Dakota
Abstract
The use of peer facilitators in health programs has great potential. One important application is prevention and control of type 2 diabetes among American Indians.
To explore the experience of American Indian facilitators in a culturally appropriate intervention (Talking Circles) on 2 Northern Plains reservations. The Talking Circles offered a forum for educational dialogue on diabetes risk factors and the management of type 2 diabetes.
Phenomenology, a qualitative research approach, was used to answer the research question: "What did Native Talking Circle facilitators experience?" Participants were 4 lay health workers from the intervention reservations who had been trained to present a diabetes curriculum while coordinating and guiding the group discussion. During open-ended, taped interviews, the facilitators shared their experiences conducting the Talking Circles. Analysis categorized the experiences into common themes to explain the phenomena and cultural construction of oral discussions (Talking Circles) of diabetes.
Themes included the concept of "a calling" to do the work, which included a self-growth process, a blending of 2 worldviews as a diabetes intervention strategy, the importance of translating educational materials in a liaison role, and commitment to tribal people and communities.
The experience of the facilitators was positive because they were knowledgeable about American Indian culture and worldview and were trained in both Talking Circle facilitation and type 2 diabetes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12696854 View in PubMed
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Persistent smoking among Northern Plains Indians: lenient attitudes, low harm value, and partiality toward cigarette smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164829
Source
J Cult Divers. 2006;13(4):181-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Felicia Schanche Hodge
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of California at Los Angeles, 700 Tiverton, #5940 Factor Building, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7102, USA. fhodge@sonnet.ucla.edu
Source
J Cult Divers. 2006;13(4):181-5
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Minnesota - epidemiology
Nebraska - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Smoking - ethnology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods
South Dakota - epidemiology
Tobacco Use Disorder - ethnology
Abstract
Smoking rates among American Indian youth and adults are the highest in the nation. Funded by the University of Minnesota Cancer Center, the Tobacco Policies Among Plains Indians Project held focus groups on seven reservations during 2001-2002. Members of three Ojibwe reservations in Minnesota, three Sioux reservations in South Dakota, and one Winnebago reservation in Nebraska participated. Areas investigated included smoking knowledge, initiation, attitudes and behaviors, and perceptions of harm. Findings indicate that lenient attitudes toward smoking behaviors, low harm value, and partiality toward the smoking habit and the ritualistic behavior it invokes are long-standing and powerful to overcome. To initiate interventions for persistent smoking, tribes will need to target efforts toward the creation of healthy communities.
PubMed ID
17338487 View in PubMed
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