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Turning around the intergenerational impact of residential schools on Aboriginal people: implications for health policy and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170233
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Dec;37(4):38-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Dawn Smith
Colleen Varcoe
Nancy Edwards
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Dec;37(4):38-60
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Colonialism
Compensation and Redress
Consumer Participation
Cultural Diversity
Female
Focus Groups
Health Policy
Health services needs and demand
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Intergenerational Relations - ethnology
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Poverty - ethnology
Prejudice
Prenatal care - organization & administration
Public Housing
Schools - organization & administration
Social Values
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Violence - ethnology
Abstract
This paper reports on the first wave of results from a study exploring the views and experiences of community-based stakeholders on improving care for pregnant and parenting Aboriginal people in Canada. The issue of poor access to prenatal care by Aboriginal women and families is viewed through a post-colonial lens within a historical and social location. This case study was guided by participatory research principles. Data were collected through exploratory interviews and small-group discussions. The sample comprised purposively selected community leaders, providers, and community members affiliated with 2 Aboriginal health-care organizations in a mainly rural region. Participants from all 3 stakeholder groups expressed the view that care should be based on an understanding of the priorities and experiences of the pregnant and parenting Aboriginal women and families themselves. Therefore the research question What are Aboriginal parents' views of the importance of pregnancy and parenting? was added to highlight the views and life experiences of Aboriginal parents. "Turning around" the intergenerational impact of residential schools was identified as pivotal to care. The results suggest that pregnancy and parenting must be understood as reflecting both the unique individual and family experiences of Aboriginal people and the intergenerational impact of residential schools as an instrument of collective violence and as a key factor in Aboriginal Canadians' inequitable health status and access to health services.
PubMed ID
16541818 View in PubMed
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