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Childbirth experiences of professional Chinese Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177236
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;33(6):748-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Angela Cooper Brathwaite
Charmaine C Williams
Author Affiliation
Durham Region Public Health Department, Whitby, Ontario, Canada. angela.cooperbrathwaite@utoronto.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;33(6):748-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric - ethnology
Midwifery - methods
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Parturition - ethnology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
To explore the connections between culture and expectations surrounding the childbirth experience for professional Chinese Canadian women.
Descriptive and qualitative, using ethnographic interview.
Women were recruited from a community health care center in metropolitan Toronto.
Six professional Chinese Canadian women who had experienced at least one childbirth.
The respondents described adherence to many traditional values, beliefs, and practices throughout the pregnancy and childbirth experience. However, some practices were modified to address functioning in a context that could not support full expression of cultural traditions. Recent immigration to Canada was associated with less adherence to traditional Chinese rituals and beliefs.
Nurses cannot make assumptions about who will use traditional cultural practices or about the circumstances in which they are relevant. Nurses need to be aware of cultural expectations so they can provide culturally competent care, but they should also be aware of how to engage in discussions to clarify individual patient priorities.
PubMed ID
15561663 View in PubMed
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HIV prevention for Black women: structural barriers and opportunities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155856
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 Aug;19(3):829-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Peter A Newman
Charmaine C Williams
Notisha Massaquoi
Marsha Brown
Carmen Logie
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, 246 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A1. p.newman@utoronto.ca
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 Aug;19(3):829-41
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa - ethnology
African Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Demography
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prejudice
Primary Prevention - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Risk factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Taboo
Women's Health Services - organization & administration - utilization
Abstract
Black women bear a disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in North America. The purpose of this investigation was to explore Black Canadian women's perspectives on HIV risk and prevention. Four 90-minute focus groups (n=26) and six key informant interviews were conducted in Toronto with Black women of African and Caribbean descent and low socioeconomic status. Data analysis revealed a number of potent barriers to existing HIV preventive interventions: stigma, cultural disconnections, lack of engagement of Black religious institutions, and multiple intersecting forms of discrimination. Recommended HIV prevention opportunities included the Black church, mainstreaming, health care providers, and ethno-specific agencies. HIV prevention strategies for North American Black women, rather than focusing on HIV and individual risk behaviors, may benefit from a primary focus on social and structural factors (e.g., promoting gender equality, economic opportunity, women-controlled prevention technologies and combating racism in health care) thereby integrating HIV prevention into the larger context of community health and survival.
PubMed ID
18677073 View in PubMed
Less detail