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The experience of HIV diagnosis among Aboriginal people living with HIV/AIDS and depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115147
Source
Qual Health Res. 2013 Jun;23(6):815-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Roy Cain
Randy Jackson
Tracey Prentice
Evan Collins
Judy Mill
Kevin Barlow
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work (KTH-312), McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. cainr@mcmaster.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2013 Jun;23(6):815-24
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Depression - ethnology - psychology
Family Relations - ethnology
Female
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Shame
Social Isolation
Social Stigma
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Abstract
In this article, we consider how the broad context of Aboriginal people's lives can shape their experience and understanding of their HIV diagnosis. We conducted interviews across Canada with 72 Aboriginal people living with HIV who also reported feelings of depression. Consistent with what has been found in previous studies, participants responded to their HIV diagnosis with shock, disbelief, and often anger. Prior depression, drug and alcohol use, multiple losses, stigma, and social isolation also shaped how participants experienced their diagnosis. We consider how the history of colonization of Aboriginal communities in Canada relates to the experience of HIV diagnosis, and end with a discussion of the service implications of our findings.
PubMed ID
23539094 View in PubMed
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An examination of stress among Aboriginal women and men with diabetes in Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179442
Source
Ethn Health. 2004 May;9(2):189-212
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Yoshi Iwasaki
Judith Bartlett
John O'Neil
Author Affiliation
Health, Leisure and Human Performance Research Institute, 102 Frank Kennedy Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Mannitoba, Canada. iwasakiy@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
Ethn Health. 2004 May;9(2):189-212
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Diabetes Mellitus - economics - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Female
Health Expenditures
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Poverty
Self Care - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - etiology
Abstract
In this study, a series of focus groups were conducted to gain an understanding of the nature of stress among Canadian Aboriginal women and men living with diabetes. Specifically, attention was given to the meanings Aboriginal peoples with diabetes attach to their lived experiences of stress, and the major sources or causes of stress in their lives. The key common themes identified are concerned not only with health-related issues (i.e. physical stress of managing diabetes, psychological stress of managing diabetes, fears about the future, suffering the complications of diabetes, and financial aspects of living with diabetes), but also with marginal economic conditions (e.g. poverty, unemployment); trauma and violence (e.g. abuse, murder, suicide, missing children, bereavement); and cultural, historical, and political aspects linked to the identity of being Aboriginal (e.g. 'deep-rooted racism', identity problems). These themes are, in fact, acknowledged not as mutually exclusive, but as intertwined. Furthermore, the findings suggest that it is important to give attention to diversity in the Aboriginal population. Specifically, Métis-specific stressors, as well as female-specific stressors, were identified. An understanding of stress experienced by Aboriginal women and men with diabetes has important implications for policy and programme planning to help eliminate or reduce at-risk stress factors, prevent stress-related illnesses, and enhance their health and life quality.
PubMed ID
15223576 View in PubMed
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Barriers to providing effective mental health services to American Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191397
Source
Ment Health Serv Res. 2001 Dec;3(4):215-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
J L Johnson
M C Cameron
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University at Buffalo, New York 14260-1050, USA. jj44@acsu.buffalo.edu
Source
Ment Health Serv Res. 2001 Dec;3(4):215-23
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Prejudice
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Like most indigenous populations throughout the world who have undergone innumerable cultural changes, the mental health care needs of American Indians are great. Some surveys conducted by the Indian Health Service show high rates of suicide, mortality, depression and substance abuse. Little is known about effective mental health care among American Indians due, in part, to the lack of culturally appropriate models of mental health in American Indians. This article presents a cultural framework in order to understand the mental health care needs of American Indians and discusses barriers to providing effective mental health services to American Indians.
PubMed ID
11859967 View in PubMed
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American Indian and Alaska Native Cancer Patients' Perceptions of a Culturally Specific Patient Navigator Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289968
Source
J Prim Prev. 2017 Apr; 38(1-2):121-135
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Carol Grimes
Jenine Dankovchik
Megan Cahn
Victoria Warren-Mears
Author Affiliation
Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board, 918 NE Rosa Parks Way, Portland, OR, 97211, USA.
Source
J Prim Prev. 2017 Apr; 38(1-2):121-135
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska Natives - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Competency
Female
Humans
Idaho
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Neoplasms - ethnology - psychology
Oregon
Patient Navigation - methods - organization & administration - standards
Patient Satisfaction - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
Lack of access to care, funding limitations, cultural, and social barriers are challenges specific to tribal communities that have led to adverse cancer outcomes among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN). While the cancer navigator model has been shown to be effective in other underserved communities, it has not been widely implemented in Indian Country. We conducted in-depth interviews with 40 AI/AN patients at tribal clinics in Idaho and Oregon. We developed the survey instrument in partnership with community members to ensure a culturally appropriate semi-structured questionnaire. Questions explored barriers to accessing care, perceptions of the navigator program, satisfaction, and recommendations. AI/AN cancer patients reported physical, emotional, financial, and transportation barriers to care, but most did not feel there were any cultural barriers to receiving care. Navigator services most commonly used included decision making, referrals, transportation, scheduling appointments, and communication. Satisfaction with the program was high. Our study provides a template to develop a culturally appropriate survey instrument for use with an AI/AN population, which could be adapted for use with other indigenous patient populations. Although our sample was small, our qualitative analysis facilitated a deeper understanding of the barriers faced by this population and how a navigator program may best address them. The results reveal the strengths and weakness of this program, and provide baseline patient satisfaction numbers which will allow future patient navigator programs to better create evaluation benchmarks.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27838858 View in PubMed
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Ways of knowing about health: an aboriginal perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209239
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Mar;19(3):28-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
C L Turton
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, USA.
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Mar;19(3):28-36
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Folklore
Great Lakes Region
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Knowledge
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
Because of the questionable applicability to extant health promotion models and middle-range theories to aboriginal peoples, foundational inquiries examining the nature of cultural beliefs and ways of knowing about health within the cultures of various ethnic groups are imperative. This article describes the ways of knowing about health reported by Ojibwe people during an ethnographic inquiry in the Great Lakes region. These ways included stories from the oral tradition, authoritative knowledge of elders, "commonsense" models of illness and health, spiritual knowledge, and knowing oneself. The health-world view, a conceptual orientation for investigating health beliefs, is offered.
PubMed ID
9055028 View in PubMed
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Childbirth in the north. A qualitative study in the Moose Factory zone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221320
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1993 Apr;39:781-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
G. Webber
R. Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1993 Apr;39:781-8
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aircraft
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Choice Behavior
Educational Status
Female
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Maternal Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Medically underserved area
Ontario
Parity
Patient Satisfaction - ethnology
Questionnaires
Transportation of Patients - methods - standards
Abstract
Cree women from the Moose Factory zone were asked about their views on evacuation for childbirth. Significant concerns cited were separation from children, loneliness, boredom, and the hospital accommodations. Shopping, the medical staff and equipment, and the opportunity to visit relatives were considered positive factors. Suggested improvements were to bring along family members, to provide alternative accommodation, and to have activities to occupy the time.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1987 Dec 1;137(11):1017-213676945
PubMed ID
8495136 View in PubMed
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Health-related concerns of Canadian aboriginal people residing in urban areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216485
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 1995 Jan-Feb;42(1):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Shestowsky
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 1995 Jan-Feb;42(1):23-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Questionnaires
Urban health
Abstract
Concerned about the health care system's inadequacy to meet the needs of Aboriginal Canadians, particularly of those in urban areas, the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) initiated a project to determine their health-related concerns. The aim was to determine how the expressed needs of urban-dwelling Aboriginals could be met through a health care system based on primary health care.
PubMed ID
7713687 View in PubMed
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Canadian First Nations women's beliefs about pregnancy and prenatal care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216537
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1995;27(1):89-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
E H Sokoloski
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1995;27(1):89-100
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Pregnancy - psychology
Prenatal Care - utilization
Questionnaires
Abstract
Evidence links adequate prenatal care to improved birth outcomes. Research, however, indicates that First Nations women do not attend regularly for prenatal care. In the current study, seven informants, representing three First Nations tribes, were extensively interviewed to examine their beliefs about pregnancy and participation in prenatal care. First Nations women conceptualized pregnancy in a spiritual context and believed it to be a healthy, natural process requiring no intervention. Since they believed they were responsible for "taking care of themselves" during pregnancy, cultural practices that were thought to promote a healthy pregnancy were espoused. First Nations women were reportedly often dissatisfied with health-care providers in prenatal clinics. Their expectations of freely offered explanations and a friendly non-authoritarian approach were often not realized and their beliefs about pregnancy were in conflict with those of health-care providers. Barriers to prenatal care might be reduced by improving communication and providing holistic culture-specific care.
PubMed ID
7621378 View in PubMed
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First Nations people's challenge in managing coronary artery disease risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160905
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Oct;17(8):1074-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Kathryn M King
Julianne Sanguins
Lisa McGregor
Pamela LeBlanc
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Oct;17(8):1074-87
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Artery Disease - ethnology - prevention & control
Culture
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
First Nations peoples bring a particular history and cultural perspective to healing and well-being that significantly influences their health behaviors. The authors used grounded theory methods to describe and explain how ethnocultural affiliation and gender influence the process that 22 First Nations people underwent when making lifestyle changes related to their coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The transcribed interviews revealed a core variable, meeting the challenge. Meeting the challenge of CAD risk management was influenced by intrapersonal, interpersonal (relationships with others), extrapersonal (i.e., the community and government), sociodemographic, and gendered factors. Salient elements for the participants included their beliefs about origins of illness, the role of family, challenges to accessing information, financial and resource management, and the gendered element of body image. Health care providers need to understand the historical, social, and culturally embedded factors that influence First Nations people's appraisal of their CAD.
PubMed ID
17928480 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.