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Physical activity of Aboriginals with type 2 diabetes: an exploratory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175292
Source
Ethn Dis. 2005;15(2):256-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Stephanie Brunet
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Kim Raine
Kerry Courneya
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Promotion Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.
Source
Ethn Dis. 2005;15(2):256-66
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - prevention & control
Energy Metabolism
Exercise - physiology - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Psychological Theory
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Values - ethnology
Abstract
Given the magnitude of the diabetes epidemic among Canadian Aboriginals and the corresponding need to develop physical activity interventions, the aims of this study were to: 1) examine the meaning of physical activity; 2) assess physical activity behavior levels; and 3) examine the association of key Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) constructs with physical activity behavior. Thirty-four Aboriginals with diabetes completed a survey composed of questions regarding: 1) the perceived meaning of physical activity; 2) physical activity behavior; and 3) SCT constructs. An emerging theme revealed that some participants perceived physical activity leisure-time activities as appropriate across the lifespan, while the majority perceived leisure-time activities to be only for youth. Based on the reported energy expenditure estimates, 61.5% of participants were categorized as sedentary. However, when occupational and household activities were taken into account, 33.0% were categorized as sedentary. Bivariate correlations revealed that no SCT constructs were significantly associated with energy expenditure scores. Results suggest that specific SCT construct items may help understand physical activity behavior change.
Notes
SummaryForPatientsIn: Ethn Dis. 2005 Spring;15(2):353-415825988
PubMed ID
15825972 View in PubMed
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First Nations people's challenge in managing coronary artery disease risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160905
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Oct;17(8):1074-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Kathryn M King
Julianne Sanguins
Lisa McGregor
Pamela LeBlanc
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Oct;17(8):1074-87
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Artery Disease - ethnology - prevention & control
Culture
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
First Nations peoples bring a particular history and cultural perspective to healing and well-being that significantly influences their health behaviors. The authors used grounded theory methods to describe and explain how ethnocultural affiliation and gender influence the process that 22 First Nations people underwent when making lifestyle changes related to their coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The transcribed interviews revealed a core variable, meeting the challenge. Meeting the challenge of CAD risk management was influenced by intrapersonal, interpersonal (relationships with others), extrapersonal (i.e., the community and government), sociodemographic, and gendered factors. Salient elements for the participants included their beliefs about origins of illness, the role of family, challenges to accessing information, financial and resource management, and the gendered element of body image. Health care providers need to understand the historical, social, and culturally embedded factors that influence First Nations people's appraisal of their CAD.
PubMed ID
17928480 View in PubMed
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The artistry and ability of traditional women healers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185389
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. strut005@tc.umn.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Role
United States
Abstract
In a phenomenological research study with a purposeful sample, 6 Ojibwa and Cree indigenous women healers from Canada and the United States shared their experience of being a traditional healer. Using stories obtained during open-ended, unstructured interviews, in this article I depict the lives, backgrounds, and traditional healing practices of women who, in the past, have not been afforded an opportunity to dialogue about their healing art and abilities. The methods of these women healers, their arts and their gifts, are different from those of Western conventional medicine because of dissimilar world views related to health and illness. An increased awareness of health care providers related to the ancient art of traditional healing currently practiced in communities by gifted women who provide culturally specific holistic healing and health care is essential.
PubMed ID
12746005 View in PubMed
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The experience of native peer facilitators in the campaign against type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185829
Source
J Rural Health. 2003;19(2):174-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Felicia Schanche Hodge
Lorelei De Cora
Betty Geishirt-Cantrell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis 55455, USA. strut005@umn.edu
Source
J Rural Health. 2003;19(2):174-80
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Career Choice
Community Health Workers - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - prevention & control
Female
Health promotion
Health Services, Indigenous - manpower
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Nebraska
Peer Group
Qualitative Research
Rural Health
South Dakota
Abstract
The use of peer facilitators in health programs has great potential. One important application is prevention and control of type 2 diabetes among American Indians.
To explore the experience of American Indian facilitators in a culturally appropriate intervention (Talking Circles) on 2 Northern Plains reservations. The Talking Circles offered a forum for educational dialogue on diabetes risk factors and the management of type 2 diabetes.
Phenomenology, a qualitative research approach, was used to answer the research question: "What did Native Talking Circle facilitators experience?" Participants were 4 lay health workers from the intervention reservations who had been trained to present a diabetes curriculum while coordinating and guiding the group discussion. During open-ended, taped interviews, the facilitators shared their experiences conducting the Talking Circles. Analysis categorized the experiences into common themes to explain the phenomena and cultural construction of oral discussions (Talking Circles) of diabetes.
Themes included the concept of "a calling" to do the work, which included a self-growth process, a blending of 2 worldviews as a diabetes intervention strategy, the importance of translating educational materials in a liaison role, and commitment to tribal people and communities.
The experience of the facilitators was positive because they were knowledgeable about American Indian culture and worldview and were trained in both Talking Circle facilitation and type 2 diabetes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12696854 View in PubMed
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American Indian and Alaska Native Cancer Patients' Perceptions of a Culturally Specific Patient Navigator Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289968
Source
J Prim Prev. 2017 Apr; 38(1-2):121-135
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Carol Grimes
Jenine Dankovchik
Megan Cahn
Victoria Warren-Mears
Author Affiliation
Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board, 918 NE Rosa Parks Way, Portland, OR, 97211, USA.
Source
J Prim Prev. 2017 Apr; 38(1-2):121-135
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska Natives - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Competency
Female
Humans
Idaho
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Neoplasms - ethnology - psychology
Oregon
Patient Navigation - methods - organization & administration - standards
Patient Satisfaction - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
Lack of access to care, funding limitations, cultural, and social barriers are challenges specific to tribal communities that have led to adverse cancer outcomes among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN). While the cancer navigator model has been shown to be effective in other underserved communities, it has not been widely implemented in Indian Country. We conducted in-depth interviews with 40 AI/AN patients at tribal clinics in Idaho and Oregon. We developed the survey instrument in partnership with community members to ensure a culturally appropriate semi-structured questionnaire. Questions explored barriers to accessing care, perceptions of the navigator program, satisfaction, and recommendations. AI/AN cancer patients reported physical, emotional, financial, and transportation barriers to care, but most did not feel there were any cultural barriers to receiving care. Navigator services most commonly used included decision making, referrals, transportation, scheduling appointments, and communication. Satisfaction with the program was high. Our study provides a template to develop a culturally appropriate survey instrument for use with an AI/AN population, which could be adapted for use with other indigenous patient populations. Although our sample was small, our qualitative analysis facilitated a deeper understanding of the barriers faced by this population and how a navigator program may best address them. The results reveal the strengths and weakness of this program, and provide baseline patient satisfaction numbers which will allow future patient navigator programs to better create evaluation benchmarks.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27838858 View in PubMed
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Ways of knowing about health: an aboriginal perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209239
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Mar;19(3):28-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
C L Turton
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, USA.
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Mar;19(3):28-36
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Folklore
Great Lakes Region
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Knowledge
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
Because of the questionable applicability to extant health promotion models and middle-range theories to aboriginal peoples, foundational inquiries examining the nature of cultural beliefs and ways of knowing about health within the cultures of various ethnic groups are imperative. This article describes the ways of knowing about health reported by Ojibwe people during an ethnographic inquiry in the Great Lakes region. These ways included stories from the oral tradition, authoritative knowledge of elders, "commonsense" models of illness and health, spiritual knowledge, and knowing oneself. The health-world view, a conceptual orientation for investigating health beliefs, is offered.
PubMed ID
9055028 View in PubMed
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An examination of stress among Aboriginal women and men with diabetes in Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179442
Source
Ethn Health. 2004 May;9(2):189-212
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Yoshi Iwasaki
Judith Bartlett
John O'Neil
Author Affiliation
Health, Leisure and Human Performance Research Institute, 102 Frank Kennedy Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Mannitoba, Canada. iwasakiy@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
Ethn Health. 2004 May;9(2):189-212
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Diabetes Mellitus - economics - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Female
Health Expenditures
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Poverty
Self Care - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - etiology
Abstract
In this study, a series of focus groups were conducted to gain an understanding of the nature of stress among Canadian Aboriginal women and men living with diabetes. Specifically, attention was given to the meanings Aboriginal peoples with diabetes attach to their lived experiences of stress, and the major sources or causes of stress in their lives. The key common themes identified are concerned not only with health-related issues (i.e. physical stress of managing diabetes, psychological stress of managing diabetes, fears about the future, suffering the complications of diabetes, and financial aspects of living with diabetes), but also with marginal economic conditions (e.g. poverty, unemployment); trauma and violence (e.g. abuse, murder, suicide, missing children, bereavement); and cultural, historical, and political aspects linked to the identity of being Aboriginal (e.g. 'deep-rooted racism', identity problems). These themes are, in fact, acknowledged not as mutually exclusive, but as intertwined. Furthermore, the findings suggest that it is important to give attention to diversity in the Aboriginal population. Specifically, Métis-specific stressors, as well as female-specific stressors, were identified. An understanding of stress experienced by Aboriginal women and men with diabetes has important implications for policy and programme planning to help eliminate or reduce at-risk stress factors, prevent stress-related illnesses, and enhance their health and life quality.
PubMed ID
15223576 View in PubMed
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The Alaska Native Women's Wellness Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3977
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1999 Sep-Oct;20(5):487-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Stillwater
Author Affiliation
Southcentral Foundation, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1999 Sep-Oct;20(5):487-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Women's health
Abstract
Alaska Native women have encountered many obstacles in the health care system which deter them from adhering to cancer screening recommendations. To improve access, it was necessary for us to listen to them and their attitudes about health care. As a result of this assessment, we changed our approach resulting in an overall increase in screening rates from 14% to 62%. A case example is presented to demonstrate barriers to cancer screening and our techniques for overcoming them.
PubMed ID
10776117 View in PubMed
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Breast and cervical cancer screening practices among American Indian and Alaska Native women in the United States, 1992-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3988
Source
Prev Med. 1999 Oct;29(4):287-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
S S Coughlin
R J Uhler
D K Blackman
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341, USA. SIC9@CDC.Gov
Source
Prev Med. 1999 Oct;29(4):287-95
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis
Educational Status
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that American Indian and Alaska Native women have important barriers to cancer screening and underuse cancer screening tests. METHODS: We examined the breast and cervical cancer screening practices of 4,961 American Indian and Alaska Native women in 47 states from 1992 through 1997 by using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. RESULTS: About 65.1% [95% confidence interval (CI) 60.2 to 69.9%] of women in this sample aged 50 years or older had received a mammogram in the past 2 years. About 82.6% (95% CI 80.1 to 85.2%) of women aged 18 years or older who had not undergone a hysterectomy had received a Papanicolaou test in the past 3 years. Older women and those with less education were less likely to be screened. Women who had seen a physician in the past year were much more likely to have been screened. CONCLUSIONS: These results underscore the need for continued efforts to ensure that American Indian and Alaska Native women who are elderly or medically underserved have access to cancer screening services.
Notes
Erratum In: Prev Med 2000 Apr;30(4):348-52
PubMed ID
10547054 View in PubMed
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Respecting tribal traditions in research and publications: voices of five Native American nurse scholars.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173647
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Jul;16(3):193-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Jana Lauderdale
Lee Anne Nichols
Lillian Tom-Orme
C June Strickland
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, MN, USA.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Jul;16(3):193-201
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Nursing Research
Professional Competence
Transcultural Nursing - standards
United States
Abstract
A dialogue with five Native American scholars provides insight into conducting research and publishing resulting manuscripts on Native American topics, specifically healing beliefs and practices. This information provides a means to develop sensitivity and create understanding about concerns held by Native Americans regarding sharing certain defined cultural information with those outside the culture. The article identifies salient tribal issues related to research, discusses perspectives important to tribal nations and Native individuals surrounding research, and supplies a base on which to formulate further discussions.
PubMed ID
16044622 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.