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Reflections on cancer in the context of women's health: focus group discussions with Iranian immigrant women in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17225
Source
Women Health. 2004;39(4):75-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Azita Emami
Carol Tishelman
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden. azita.emami@omv.ki.se
Source
Women Health. 2004;39(4):75-96
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
In cancer prevention, culture and ethnicity have often been considered in negative terms as a variable to explain "misconceptions" and "knowledge deficits." This study, based on data from nine focus groups with Iranian immigrant women of various ages residing in Sweden, was instead conducted to explore reasoning on cancer prevention and screening within a framework of beliefs on health, illness and sickness for women in general. Complex relationships and reasoning about health maintenance and disease prevention were found to be related to perceptions of body and self, and to the continual construction of social roles throughout the life span. Spontaneous discussion of relationships between stress, maintaining health and developing disease arose in all groups. Negative outcomes associated with stress have consequences for information provision, as focusing on the negative is viewed as leading to negative outcomes. "Cultural" differences appear to be as related to social roles and phases in the life cycle, as to ethnicity.
PubMed ID
15691086 View in PubMed
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Making sense of illness: late-in-life migration as point of departure for elderly Iranian immigrants' explanatory models of illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70699
Source
J Immigr Health. 2005 Jul;7(3):153-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Azita Emami
Sandra Torres
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. azita.emami@omv.ki.se
Source
J Immigr Health. 2005 Jul;7(3):153-64
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cost of Illness
Cultural Characteristics
Emigration and Immigration
Family Relations
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged
Health status
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Life Change Events
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Role
Social Adjustment
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
This article is based on data gathered through 60 qualitative interviews conducted within the realm of three research projects that have used "culture-appropriate lenses" to study the postmigration situation of late-in-life Iranian immigrants to Sweden. The findings gathered through these studies were interpreted against the backdrop that culturally appropriate nursing theories provide. This meant that it was, at times, these elders' backgrounds as cultural "others" that were implicitly used to make sense of the various issues that were brought to the fore by these studies. The particular issue with which this article is concerned is the "unusualness" of these elders' explanatory models of illness. Inspired by the concept "definition of situation" in the symbolic interactionist perspective and by the feeling that this perspective might bring about a different interpretation of the original findings regarding their understandings of illness and disease, we set out to conduct a secondary analysis of these elders' explanatory models of illness. The findings presented in this article will show how the elderly Iranian immigrants interviewed in these three studies utilize the process of "late in life migration" as a point of reference for their understandings of what has caused the illnesses from which they suffered. Hereby we will suggest that the "unusualness" of their explanatory models of illness might be best understood if we focus on what they shared as immigrants (i.e., the fact that the process of late-in-life migration has made their culture obsolete) as opposed to what they shared as Iranians (i.e., their culture of origin).
PubMed ID
15900416 View in PubMed
Less detail