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314 records – page 1 of 32.

Cancer causation beliefs in an Alaskan village.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2386
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1988 Sep-Oct; 30(5):155-158.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
Sprott, J.E.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1988 Sep-Oct; 30(5):155-158.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Carcinoma of the lung
Water supply
Alaska
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Consumer Participation - methods
Humans
Inuits
Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Public Opinion
Smoking - epidemiology
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2146.
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Construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older in the north of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87255
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Feb;17(4):451-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Aléx Lena
Hammarström Anne
Norberg Astrid
Lundman Berit
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.alex@nurs.umu.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Feb;17(4):451-9
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Family - ethnology
Friends - psychology
Gender Identity
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Men - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Personal Satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Concept
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Behavior
Social Values
Sweden
Work - psychology
Abstract
AIM: The aim was to analyse the construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older. BACKGROUND: All societies have a gender order, constructed from multiple ideas of what is seen as feminine and masculine. As the group of men aged 85 and older is increasing in size and their demand for care will increase, we must recognize the importance of studying these men and various discourses of masculinities. DESIGN: Qualitative explorative. METHODS: Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse thematic narratives. Masculinity theories provided the point of departure for the analysis. RESULTS: The analysis coalesced into three masculinities. 'Being in the male centre', developed from subthemes as: taking pride in one's work and economic situation; being in the centre in relation to others; regarding women as sexual objects; and belonging to a select group. 'Striving to maintain the male facade' developed from subthemes as: emphasizing 'important' connections; having feelings of loss; striving to maintain old norms and rejecting the fact of being old. 'Being related' was formulated from subthemes as: feeling at home with domestic duties; being concerned; accepting one's own aging; and reflecting on life. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates the importance of being aware of the existence of multiple masculinities, in contrast to the generally unproblematic and unsubtle particular healthcare approaches which consider men as simply belonging to one masculinity. Relevance to clinical practice. Diverse masculinities probably affect encounters between men and healthcare providers and others who work with an older population and therefore our results are of importance in a caring context.
PubMed ID
18205678 View in PubMed
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Completing the circle: elders speak about end-of-life care with aboriginal families in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144144
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):6-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mary Hampton
Angelina Baydala
Carrie Bourassa
Kim McKay-McNabb
Cheryl Placsko
Ken Goodwill
Betty McKenna
Pat McNabb
Roxanne Boekelder
Author Affiliation
Luther College, University of Regina Campus, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4S 0A2. mary.hampton@uregina.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):6-14
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cultural Competency
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Professional-Patient Relations
Saskatchewan
Terminal Care
Abstract
In this article, we share words spoken by Aboriginal elders from Saskatchewan, Canada, in response to the research question, "What would you like non-Aboriginal health care providers to know when providing end-of-life care for Aboriginal families?" Our purpose in publishing these results in a written format is to place information shared by oral tradition in an academic context and to make the information accessible to other researchers. Recent theoretical work in the areas of death and dying suggests that cultural beliefs and practices are particularly influential at the end of life; however, little work describing the traditional beliefs and practices of Aboriginal peoples in Canada exists to guide culturally appropriate end-of-life care delivery. Purposive sampling procedures were used to recruit five elders from culturally diverse First Nations in southern Saskatchewan. Key informant Aboriginal elder participants were videotaped by two Aboriginal research assistants, who approached the elders at powwows. Narrative analysis of the key informant interview transcripts was conducted to identify key concepts and emerging narrative themes describing culturally appropriate end-of-life health care for Aboriginal families. Six themes were identified to organize the data into a coherent narrative: realization; gathering of community; care and comfort/transition; moments after death; grief, wake, funeral; and messages to health care providers. These themes told the story of the dying person's journey and highlighted important messages from elders to non-Aboriginal health care providers.
PubMed ID
20402179 View in PubMed
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Factors behind HIV testing practices among Canadian Aboriginal peoples living off-reserve.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144229
Source
AIDS Care. 2010 Mar;22(3):324-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Treena R Orchard
Eric Druyts
Colin W McInnes
Ken Clement
Erin Ding
Kimberly A Fernandes
Aranka Anema
Viviane D Lima
Robert S Hogg
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada.
Source
AIDS Care. 2010 Mar;22(3):324-31
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Government Programs
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine factors associated with HIV testing among Aboriginal peoples in Canada who live off-reserve. Data were drawn for individuals aged 15-44 from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey (2001), which represents a weighed sample of 520,493 Aboriginal men and women living off-reserve. Bivariable analysis and logistic regression were used to identify factors associated with individuals who had received an HIV test within the past year. In adjusted multivariable analysis, female gender, younger age, unemployment, contact with a family doctor or traditional healer within the past year, and "good" or "fair/poor" self-rated health increased the odds of HIV testing. Completion of high-school education, rural residency, and less frequent alcohol and cigarette consumption decreased the odds of HIV testing. A number of differences emerged when the sample was analyzed by gender, most notably females who self-reported "good" or "fair/poor" health status were more likely to have had an HIV test, yet males with comparable health status were less likely to have had an HIV test. Additionally, frequent alcohol consumption and less than high-school education was associated with an increased odds of HIV testing among males, but not females. Furthermore, while younger age was associated with an increased odds of having an HIV test in the overall model, this was particularly relevant for females aged 15-24. These outcomes provide evidence of the need for improved HIV testing strategies to reach greater numbers of Aboriginal peoples living off-reserve. They also echo the long-standing call for culturally appropriate HIV-related programming while drawing new attention to the importance of gender and age, two factors that are often generalized under the rubric of culturally relevant or appropriate program development.
PubMed ID
20390512 View in PubMed
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Physical activity of Aboriginals with type 2 diabetes: an exploratory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175292
Source
Ethn Dis. 2005;15(2):256-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Stephanie Brunet
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Kim Raine
Kerry Courneya
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Promotion Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.
Source
Ethn Dis. 2005;15(2):256-66
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - prevention & control
Energy Metabolism
Exercise - physiology - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Psychological Theory
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Values - ethnology
Abstract
Given the magnitude of the diabetes epidemic among Canadian Aboriginals and the corresponding need to develop physical activity interventions, the aims of this study were to: 1) examine the meaning of physical activity; 2) assess physical activity behavior levels; and 3) examine the association of key Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) constructs with physical activity behavior. Thirty-four Aboriginals with diabetes completed a survey composed of questions regarding: 1) the perceived meaning of physical activity; 2) physical activity behavior; and 3) SCT constructs. An emerging theme revealed that some participants perceived physical activity leisure-time activities as appropriate across the lifespan, while the majority perceived leisure-time activities to be only for youth. Based on the reported energy expenditure estimates, 61.5% of participants were categorized as sedentary. However, when occupational and household activities were taken into account, 33.0% were categorized as sedentary. Bivariate correlations revealed that no SCT constructs were significantly associated with energy expenditure scores. Results suggest that specific SCT construct items may help understand physical activity behavior change.
Notes
SummaryForPatientsIn: Ethn Dis. 2005 Spring;15(2):353-415825988
PubMed ID
15825972 View in PubMed
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Canadian Aboriginal people's experiences with HIV/AIDS as portrayed in selected English language Aboriginal media (1996-2000).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175886
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 May;60(10):2169-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Juanne N Clarke
Daniela B Friedman
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology; Anthropology, Wilfrid Laurier University, 75 University Avenue, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3C5. jclarke@wlu.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 May;60(10):2169-80
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - etiology - prevention & control
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Bibliometrics
Canada
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Newspapers
Public Opinion
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Spirituality
Stereotyping
Abstract
This paper describes the portrayal of HIV/AIDS in 14 mass print newspapers directed towards the Canadian Aboriginal population and published between 1996 and 2000. Based on qualitative content analysis the research examines both manifest and latent meanings. Manifest results of this study indicate that women and youth are under represented as persons with HIV/AIDS. The latent results note the frequent references to Aboriginal culture, and the political and economic position of Aboriginal Canadians when discussing the disease, the person with the disease, the fear of the disease and the reaction of the community to the person with the disease. Unlike mainstream media where the medical frame is dominant, HIV/AIDS are here contextualized by culture, identity, spirituality and political-economic issues.
PubMed ID
15748666 View in PubMed
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Turning around the intergenerational impact of residential schools on Aboriginal people: implications for health policy and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170233
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Dec;37(4):38-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Dawn Smith
Colleen Varcoe
Nancy Edwards
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Dec;37(4):38-60
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Colonialism
Compensation and Redress
Consumer Participation
Cultural Diversity
Female
Focus Groups
Health Policy
Health services needs and demand
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Intergenerational Relations - ethnology
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Poverty - ethnology
Prejudice
Prenatal care - organization & administration
Public Housing
Schools - organization & administration
Social Values
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Violence - ethnology
Abstract
This paper reports on the first wave of results from a study exploring the views and experiences of community-based stakeholders on improving care for pregnant and parenting Aboriginal people in Canada. The issue of poor access to prenatal care by Aboriginal women and families is viewed through a post-colonial lens within a historical and social location. This case study was guided by participatory research principles. Data were collected through exploratory interviews and small-group discussions. The sample comprised purposively selected community leaders, providers, and community members affiliated with 2 Aboriginal health-care organizations in a mainly rural region. Participants from all 3 stakeholder groups expressed the view that care should be based on an understanding of the priorities and experiences of the pregnant and parenting Aboriginal women and families themselves. Therefore the research question What are Aboriginal parents' views of the importance of pregnancy and parenting? was added to highlight the views and life experiences of Aboriginal parents. "Turning around" the intergenerational impact of residential schools was identified as pivotal to care. The results suggest that pregnancy and parenting must be understood as reflecting both the unique individual and family experiences of Aboriginal people and the intergenerational impact of residential schools as an instrument of collective violence and as a key factor in Aboriginal Canadians' inequitable health status and access to health services.
PubMed ID
16541818 View in PubMed
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Self-rated health and postnatal depressive symptoms among immigrant mothers in Qu├ębec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160193
Source
Women Health. 2007;45(4):1-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Samia Mechakra-Tahiri
Maria Victoria Zunzunegui
Louise Seguin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Départment of Social and Préventive Medicine, Université de Montréal, Québec. samiatahiri@yahoo.fr
Source
Women Health. 2007;45(4):1-17
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cohort Studies
Depression - ethnology
Depression, Postpartum - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health status
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Mental health
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Data from the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development were used to examine factors associated with postnatal depression and the links between self-rated health (SRH) and depressive symptoms in mothers 5 months after giving birth, according to immigration status. Postnatal depressive symptoms were measured using the 12-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Immigrant mothers were classified according to their ethnocultural (majority or minority) group and compared with Canadian-born mothers. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between SRH and depressive symptoms. The prevalence of high depressive symptoms was larger among immigrants from minority groups (24.7%) than among immigrants from majority groups (8.3%) and Canadian-born mothers 11.2%). SRH was associated with depressive symptoms among Canadian- born mothers, but not among minority immigrant mothers. Canadian- born mothers integrated mental health into their assessment of overall health status, however, depressive symptoms among minority immigrant mothers were common, and their determinants warrant further research.
PubMed ID
18032165 View in PubMed
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Relationships between culture and health status: a multi-site study of the older Chinese in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159053
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26(3):171-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Daniel W L Lai
Ka Tat Tsang
Neena Chappell
David C Y Lai
Shirley B Y Chau
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. dlai@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26(3):171-83
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Poverty
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Social Support
Social Values - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study examined the relationships between culture and the health status of older Chinese in Canada. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews with a cross-sectional, randomly selected sample of 2,272 older Chinese between 55 and 101 years of age in seven Canadian cities. Health status was assessed by the number of chronic illnesses, by limitations in ADL and IADL, and by information on the Medical Outcome Study Short Form SF-36. Although cultural variables explained only a small proportion of variance in health status, having a stronger level of identification with traditional Chinese health beliefs was significant in predicting physical health, number of illnesses, and limitations on IADL. Other cultural variables, including religion, country of origin, and length of residence in Canada, were also significant in predicting some health variables. Interventions to improve health should focus on strategies to enhance cultural compatibility between users and the health delivery system.
PubMed ID
18238724 View in PubMed
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314 records – page 1 of 32.