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329 records – page 1 of 33.

[Menopause, the down side of medicalization].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195877
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Jan;96(1):35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
C. Gendron
Author Affiliation
groupe de recherche multidisciplinaire féministe, Université Laval.
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Jan;96(1):35-40
Date
Jan-2000
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Drug Industry - economics
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - adverse effects - economics
Female
Humans
Menopause - ethnology
Middle Aged
Western World
Abstract
Over the past 30 years, women have been the target of intense advertising focused on hormone replacement therapy. The author takes a critical look at the distorting nature of this approach, which has succeeded in convincing many Western women that menopause is an illness, and hormone replacement therapy a panacea. Through studies she has consulted, and discussions on the economic situation associated with age and poverty among the elderly, the author underlines that menopause is a lucrative industry. She advances several relevant issues for discussion.
PubMed ID
11188678 View in PubMed
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Revisiting the Navajo way: lessons for contemporary healing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184352
Source
Perspect Biol Med. 2003;46(3):413-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Gregory W Schneider
Mark J DeHaven
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice and Community Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, USA. gregory.schneider@utsouthwestern.edu
Source
Perspect Biol Med. 2003;46(3):413-27
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Faith Healing - methods - psychology
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American
Mythology
Physician-Patient Relations
Religion and Medicine
Shamanism
Abstract
Given the paradox of the success of modern medical technology and the growing patient dissatisfaction with present-day medicine, critics have called for a reevaluation of contemporary medical practice. This paper offers a phenomenological analysis of traditional Navajo healers and their ceremonies to highlight key aspects of healing. A phenomenological view of medical practice takes into account three key features: the lifeworld, the lived body, and understanding. Because of their closeness to a phenomenological view, traditional Navajo mythology and healing practices offer insight into the healing process. Contemporary physicians can appreciate the phenomenological elements of Navajo healing ceremonies, including the Mountain Chant. Navajo healers help patients make sense of their illnesses and direct their lives accordingly, an outcome available to contemporary practitioners, who are also gifted with the benefits of new technologies. By examining scientific medicine, Navajo healing practices, and phenomenology as complementary disciplines, the authors provide the groundwork for reestablishing a more therapeutic view of health.
PubMed ID
12878811 View in PubMed
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Intensive care nurses' encounters with multicultural families in Norway: an exploratory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93193
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2008 Dec;24(6):338-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Høye Sevald
Severinsson Elisabeth
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Hedmark University College, N-2418 Elverum, Norway. sevald.hoye@hihm.no
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2008 Dec;24(6):338-48
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Communication Barriers
Cultural Diversity
Emigration and Immigration
Family - ethnology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Intensive Care - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Visitors to Patients - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore nurses' perceptions of their encounters with multicultural families in intensive care units in Norwegian hospitals. Immigrants from non-Western countries make up 6.1% of the population in Norway. When a person suffers an acute and critical illness the person's family may experience crises. Nurses' previous experiences of caring for culturally diverse patients and families is challenging due to linguistic differences, and contextual factors. Family members should be near their critically ill spouse to reduce the impact from a frightening environment. The study had a descriptive exploratory qualitative design with a retrospective focus. Three multistage focus groups consisting of 16 nurses were set up in intensive care units. The data were analysed by interpretive content analysis. The theme 'Cultural diversity and workplace stressors' emerged. This theme was characterised by four categories: 'impact on work patterns'; 'communication challenges'; 'responses to crises' and 'professional status and gender issues'. In conclusion, nurses' perception of their encounters with multicultural families in intensive care units seem to be ambiguous with challenges in interaction, and the nurses' stressors emanating from linguistic, cultural and ethnic differentness. To diminish cultural diversity the nurses strive for increased knowledge of different cultures and religions.
PubMed ID
18468898 View in PubMed
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'Race' matters: racialization and egalitarian discourses involving Aboriginal people in the Canadian health care context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93281
Source
Ethn Health. 2008 Apr;13(2):109-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tang Sannie Y
Browne Annette J
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. sytang@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Ethn Health. 2008 Apr;13(2):109-27
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health Services, Indigenous
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Prejudice
Abstract
The major purpose of this paper is to examine how 'race' and racialization operate in health care. To do so, we draw upon data from an ethnographic study that examines the complex issues surrounding health care access for Aboriginal people in an urban center in Canada. In our analysis, we strategically locate our critical examination of racialization in the 'tension of difference' between two emerging themes, namely the health care rhetoric of 'treating everyone the same,' and the perception among many Aboriginal patients that they were 'being treated differently' by health care providers because of their identity as Aboriginal people, and because of their low socio-economic status. Contrary to the prevailing discourse of egalitarianism that paints health care and other major institutions as discrimination-free, we argue that 'race' matters in health care as it intersects with other social categories including class, substance use, and history to organize inequitable access to health and health care for marginalized populations. Specifically, we illustrate how the ideological process of racialization can shape the ways that health care providers 'read' and interact with Aboriginal patients, and how some Aboriginal patients avoid seeking health care based on their expectation of being treated differently. We conclude by urging those of us in positions of influence in health care, including doctors and nurses, to critically reflect upon our own positionality and how we might be complicit in perpetuating social inequities by avoiding a critical discussion of racialization.
PubMed ID
18425710 View in PubMed
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Inverting the food pyramid? Social and cultural acceptability of Walter Willett's dietary recommendations among people with weight concerns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93365
Source
Appetite. 2008 Jul;51(1):178-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Nielsen A.
Korzen S.
Holm L.
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, Copenhagen University, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. anmn@life.ku.dk
Source
Appetite. 2008 Jul;51(1):178-86
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark
Diet - ethnology - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Obesity - prevention & control - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Responsibility
Social Values
Abstract
The article presents results from a survey that was carried out among participants in a strictly controlled dietary intervention trial in order to investigate and compare the social and cultural acceptability of three different diets. Measures of social and cultural acceptability included liking of diet, social eating events, practical matters surrounding shopping, cooking, eating, understandings of the relationship between diet type, bodyweight and health, and preferences for specific foods. The survey study focuses especially on the acceptability of the diet recommended by American epidemiologist Walter Willett. On most measures the results indicated that a diet based on Willett's recommendations had a generally high level of acceptability. Scepticism related primarily to the health and weight benefits of this diet in comparison with those of the present dietary recommendations in Denmark. The survey also revealed that participants attributed more influence on their body weight to the amount of food they ate than they did to the composition of the diets they followed. While the scope of the study does not allow for the generalizations of results to a general population level, the experimental design provides detailed insight into social and cultural aspects of experiences of strict dietary adherence.
PubMed ID
18384912 View in PubMed
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Individualised care from the orthopaedic and trauma patients' perspective: an international comparative survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93577
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2008 Nov;45(11):1586-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Suhonen Riitta
Berg Agneta
Idvall Ewa
Kalafati Maria
Katajisto Jouko
Land Lucy
Lemonidou Chryssoula
Välimäki Maritta
Leino-Kilpi Helena
Author Affiliation
Health Care District of Forssa, Forssa, Finland. suhonen.riitta@kolumbus.fi
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2008 Nov;45(11):1586-97
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Great Britain
Greece
Humans
Individuality
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Trauma - ethnology - nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Orthopedic Procedures - nursing - psychology
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although individualised nursing care is considered a core value in nursing in different countries, international comparative studies in this area are rare. In Western countries, common hospitalised patients, e.g. orthopaedic patients, often perceive health care as impersonal rather than individualised; a term which may also have different connotations in different cultures. OBJECTIVES: To describe and compare orthopaedic and trauma patients' perceptions of individuality in their care in four European countries. DESIGN: A cross-sectional comparative study. SETTINGS: 24 orthopaedic and trauma wards in 13 acute care hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: Data were collected from orthopaedic and trauma patients in Finland (n=425, response rate 85%), Greece (n=315, 86%), Sweden (n=218, 73%) and UK (n=135, 58%) between March 2005 and December 2006. METHODS: Questionnaire survey data using the Individualised Care Scale (ICS) were obtained and analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics including frequencies, percentages, means, standard deviations, 95% confidence intervals (CI), one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi2 statistics and univariate analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). RESULTS: Patients perceived that nurses generally supported their individuality during specific nursing interventions and perceived individuality in their care. There were some between-country differences in the results. Patients' individuality in the clinical situation and in decisional control over their care were also generally well supported and taken into account. However, patients' personal life situation was not supported well through nursing interventions and these patients perceived lower levels of individualised care. CONCLUSIONS: North-South axis differences in patients' perceptions of individualised care may be attributed to the way nursing care is defined and organised in different European countries. Differences may be due to the differences in regional samples, and so no firm conclusions can be made. Further research will be needed to examine the effect of patient characteristics' and health care organisation variables in association with patients' perceptions of individualised care.
PubMed ID
18291402 View in PubMed
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Dental anxiety in Danish and Chinese adults--a cross-cultural perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52784
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):123-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
E. Schwarz
H. Birn
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Public Health, University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Dentistry.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):123-30
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark - ethnology
Dental Anxiety - ethnology
Female
Health Behavior
Hong Kong
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to correlate dental anxiety as reported by two different ethnic groups with socio-demographic factors, dental status, and dental behaviour. Two randomly selected populations aged 35-44 years and 65-74 years were interviewed. The populations comprised 214 and 99 Danes and 384 and 497 Hong Kong Chinese respectively. Dental anxiety was assessed by the Corah Dental Anxiety Score (DAS). Mean DAS scores were significantly higher in Chinese than in Danes (8.7-10.3 and 6.7-8.2, respectively) and higher in the younger than in the older groups. Moderate to phobic dental anxiety was reported by 15% of the Danes and 30% of the Chinese, the latter proportion far beyond what is usually reported in Western populations. Only in the Chinese group did women report more anxiety than men. Regression analysis indicated that only a few of the variables selected to explain anxiety determinants had significant explanatory value. Among Chinese, gender was the most predominant in both age groups followed by perceived condition of teeth in the younger age group. Among Danes, perceived condition of teeth had an explanatory value for both age groups and dental visit pattern was the strongest for the younger age group. In spite of statistical significance, all explanatory values were small and indicate that variables not included in this analysis may exert a greater influence on the variation in dental anxiety. DAS, seemingly, was able to highlight variations in dental anxiety in the populations in spite of their differences and made interpretations feasible with regard to contrasting dental care behaviour and dental status.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7667665 View in PubMed
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The Nanaimo and Charles Camsell Indian Hospitals: First Nations' narratives of health care, 1945 to 1965.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139009
Source
Histoire Soc. 2010;43(85):165-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Laurie Meijer Drees
Source
Histoire Soc. 2010;43(85):165-91
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Delivery of Health Care - economics - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Agencies - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Programs - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Historiography
History of Medicine
History, 20th Century
Hospitals - history
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Narration - history
Public Opinion - history
Public Policy - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
First Nations' perspectives on health and health care as delivered by doctors, nurses, and Canada's former Indian hospital system form a significant part of Canada's medical history, as well as a part of First Nations people's personal histories. Oral histories collected in Alberta and British Columbia suggest that First Nations people who experienced the Nanaimo and Charles Camsell Indian hospitals between 1945 and 1965 perceive the value of their experiences to be reflected in their survivance, a concept recalled through narratives emphasizing both humour and pain, as well as past and present personal resilience.
PubMed ID
21114087 View in PubMed
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Exploring perinatal health in Indo-Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196193
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Apr;96(4):18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
M J Lynam
B. Gurm
R. Dhari
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia School of Nursing.
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Apr;96(4):18-24
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
India - ethnology
Maternal-Child Nursing - organization & administration
Needs Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Perinatal Care - organization & administration
Pregnancy - ethnology - psychology
Transcultural Nursing - organization & administration
Women - psychology
Abstract
Although many health concerns of women in India differ from those of Indian women in Canada, both groups of women have a high incidence of low birthweight babies. The question of how best to improve the health status of pregnant Indo-Canadian women and consequently improve pregnancy outcomes is a complex one. It involves the availability and allocation of financial and human resources, the integration of Indian cultural beliefs and attitudes with Western biomedical knowledge, the status of women in Indian culture, and Canadian social and economic issues such as demographic changes, changes in the role of the family, government policies, economic restructuring and so on.
Notes
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2000 Jun;96(6):311865479
PubMed ID
11143648 View in PubMed
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329 records – page 1 of 33.