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329 records – page 1 of 33.

Interest in alternative birthplaces among women in Ottawa-Carleton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228221
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Oct 15;143(8):707-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1990
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Oct 15;143(8):707-9
Date
Oct-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Female
Home Childbirth
Humans
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1990 May 1;142(9):963-92328467
PubMed ID
2207928 View in PubMed
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Health culture within the context of the northern environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30836
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 May;62(2):167-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Hellevi Tervo
Ludger Müller-Wille
Merja Nikkonen
Author Affiliation
Rovaniemi College of Health and Welfare, Rovaniemi, Finland. hellevi.tervo@roiami.fi
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 May;62(2):167-81
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Ethnic Groups
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This article is part of an ethnographic study that aims to describe and understand health as a phenomenon of the Sami culture. STUDY DESIGN: The article is based on literature concerning the northern environment and the Sami culture, which is analysed from the point of view of health culture. RESULTS: From the point of view of health culture, life in the northern regions requires adaptation to certain special features of the climate and the natural environment. Nature is also a versatile source of health care, healing and traditions. Particularly in the late 1990's, the northern environment and the Sami lifestyle were profoundly affected by changes in the sources of income caused by modernisation and the adaptation of traditional Sami livelihoods to governmental regulations. The current Sami values and beliefs are multilayered factors affecting health culture. The social growth milieu of Sami children as a source of health culture has changed over the generations. The key elements affecting the growth milieu have changed over time, due to the attitude of the government towards the Sami culture and the consequent changes and actions of society.
PubMed ID
12862180 View in PubMed
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Changing paradigms and their effect on American Indian and Alaska Native health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208578
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1997 May;7(4):227-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
E R Rhoades
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1997 May;7(4):227-8
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Notes
Comment On: Ann Epidemiol. 1997 May;7(4):229-409177104
PubMed ID
9177103 View in PubMed
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Continuity and change: the interpretation of illness in an Anishinaabe (Ojibway) community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227884
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1990 Dec;14(4):417-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
L C Garro
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1990 Dec;14(4):417-54
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Causality
Cultural Characteristics
Humans
Indians, North American
Linguistics
Medicine, Traditional
Abstract
Rich descriptions of Anishinaabe medical knowledge and the cultural meanings associated with illness are available in the anthropological literature, especially in the writings of A.I. Hallowell. Most of this work is based on fieldwork carried out prior to 1940 and was often motivated by a desire to reconstruct the pre-contact situation. Since that time, there have been numerous changes affecting health status and health care. This paper examines lay medical knowledge in a contemporary Canadian Anishinaabeg community, with particular attention to change and continuity in the way people explain and respond to the occurrence of illness.
PubMed ID
2276267 View in PubMed
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Indigenous Hawaiian nonmedical and medical use of the kukui tree.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174054
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Jun;11(3):397-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Ryan A K Young
Luis G Cruz
Amy C Brown
Author Affiliation
John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Jun;11(3):397-400
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Hawaii
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Phytotherapy - utilization
Plants, Medicinal
Trees
PubMed ID
15992221 View in PubMed
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Totemic medicine among the American Indians of the northwest coast.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69196
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1995 Sep;26(1-3):159-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
S W Gunn
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1995 Sep;26(1-3):159-67
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
Yukon Territory
Abstract
A description is presented of the medical beliefs of the totemic people on the Northwest American coast. The principles of Shamanic therapy are analysed. The consequences for therapeutic views by medical schools are discussed.
PubMed ID
7494716 View in PubMed
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Indigenous life stories as narratives of health and resistance: a dialogical narrative analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121595
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):64-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Bodil Hansen Blix
Torunn Hamran
Hans Ketil Normann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Care Research, Department of Health and Care Sciences, University of Tromso, Norway.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):64-85
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Female
Humans
Male
Narration
Norway
Population Groups - ethnology - psychology
Transcultural Nursing - methods
Abstract
The Sami people have historically been exposed to severe assimilation processes. The objective of this study was to explore elderly Samis' experiences of health. A total of 19 elderly Sami individuals in Norway were interviewed.This article is a dialogical narrative analysis of the life stories of 3 Sami women. The life stories are perceived as narratives of health and resistance. Postcolonial theory provides a framework for understanding the impact of historical and socioeconomic factors in people's lives and health. Narratives of resistance demonstrate that people are not passive victims of the legacy of colonialism. Resistance is not a passive state but an active process, as is health. Resistance is a resource that should be appreciated by health services, both at a systemic level--for example, through partnership with Indigenous elderly in the planning and shaping of services--and in individual encounters between patients and healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
22894007 View in PubMed
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Swedish students' attitudes toward abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221116
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1993 May-Jun;14(3):281-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
M E Lindell
H M Olsson
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1993 May-Jun;14(3):281-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Adolescent
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Questionnaires
Students - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The Swedish abortion legislation of 1975 gave women the right to make a decision about abortion before the end of the 18th week of pregnancy. The number of abortions is rising in Sweden as a chosen method of birth control. The attitudes of students toward abortion were studied in 1986-1987. A questionnaire containing items on how sex education is taught, the anatomy and physiology of reproduction, contraceptives, sexually transmitted diseases, and legal abortion was answered by 421 high school students. Results pertaining to the students' attitudes toward abortion are reported. Two thirds of the students believed that the decision about an abortion should be made by the man and woman together. Nearly all respondents believed that abortion should not be considered a method of birth control. These results may be considered a guide for interventions to prevent the need for abortion. One fourth of all pregnancies in Sweden terminate in abortion. The students in the present study thought of abortion as a solution. Authors studying samples with different cultural backgrounds have reported similar attitudes.
PubMed ID
8407619 View in PubMed
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The effects of culture and self-construal on responses to threatening health information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127495
Source
Psychol Health. 2012;27(10):1194-210
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jill A Jacobson
Li-Jun Ji
Peter H Ditto
Zhiyong Zhang
Dara H Sorkin
Sarah K Warren
Veronica Legnini
Anna Ebel-Lam
Sarah Roper-Coleman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Queen's University, 62 Arch Street, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada. jill.jacobson@queensu.ca
Source
Psychol Health. 2012;27(10):1194-210
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
California
Culture
Deception
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Ontario
Perceptual Defense
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Abstract
The current studies examined if cultural and self-construal differences in self-enhancement extended to defensive responses to health threats.
Responses to fictitious medical diagnoses were compared between Asian-Americans and European-North Americans in experiment 1 and between Canadians primed with an interdependent versus an independent self-construal in experiment 3. In experiment 2, the responses of Chinese and Canadians who were either heavy or light soft drink consumers were assessed after reading an article linking soft drink consumption to insulin resistance.
The primary-dependent measure reflected participants' defensiveness about threatening versus nonthreatening health information.
In experiment 1, all participants responded more defensively to an unfavourable than a favourable diagnosis; however, Asian-Americans responded less defensively than did European-North Americans. In experiment 2, all high soft drink consumers were less convinced by the threatening information than were low soft drink consumers; however, among high consumers, Chinese changed their self-reported consumption levels less than did European-Canadians. In experiment 3, interdependence-primed participants responded less defensively to an unfavourable diagnosis than did independence-primed participants.
Defensive reactions to threatening health information were found consistently; however, self-enhancement was more pronounced in individuals with Western cultural backgrounds or independent self-construals.
PubMed ID
22288661 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Nurse. 1996 Sep;92(8):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
S. Guruge
G. Donner
Author Affiliation
Clarke Institute of Psychiatry, Toronto.
Source
Can Nurse. 1996 Sep;92(8):36-40
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Diversity
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Transcultural Nursing - education - organization & administration
Abstract
By the year 2000, approximately one in every five Canadians will represent an ethnic minority. Even today, Canada is home to over a hundred different linguistic and cultural groups. Yet between these Canadians and the health care system there exists a large cultural gap. At the crux of the matter is the lack of recognition by health care professionals of the cultural differences and related health beliefs of various groups. A further impediment is the lack of formal educational programs, theory and research in multicultural nursing care in Canada.
PubMed ID
9095726 View in PubMed
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329 records – page 1 of 33.