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The burden of oral disorders in a population of older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223718
Source
Community Dent Health. 1992 Jun;9(2):109-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
D. Locker
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Health. 1992 Jun;9(2):109-24
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Communication
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Eating
Facial Pain - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Income
Male
Marriage
Mastication
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Mouth Diseases - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Self Concept
Abstract
This paper describes the burden of oral disorders in a population of adults aged 50 years and over living independently in the community. In so doing it uses clinical, functional, experiential and psychosocial impact measures to document the oral health status of this section of the population. The data reveal that substantial proportions of subjects report that their quality of life was compromised in some way by oral problems. Although only 24.1 per cent were edentulous, 30.5 per cent were unable to chew one or more foods; 37.2 per cent reported oral or facial pain in the previous four weeks and 67.5 per cent experienced one or more other oral symptoms. One third reported problems with eating and communication--social interaction, 18.7 per cent worried a great deal about their oral health and 30.8 per cent were dissatisfied with some aspect of their oral health status. Income was consistently associated with all health status measures examined, demonstrating the scope of inequalities in oral health. In addition, regression analysis showed that low income groups had higher scores on a psychosocial impact scale after controlling for clinical, functional and experiential oral health indicators. The paper illustrates the utility of a model of disease and its consequences derived from the international classification of impairments, disabilities and handicaps in exploring oral health.
PubMed ID
1504877 View in PubMed
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Clinical correlates of changes in self-perceived oral health in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208339
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Jun;25(3):199-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
D. Locker
Author Affiliation
Community of Dental Health Services Research Unit, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Jun;25(3):199-203
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
DMF Index
Dental Care for Aged - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Facial Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Mastication
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Self-Assessment
Tooth Loss - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Although numerous investigators have reported on self-perceived oral health status in adult and older adult populations, few have examined how these perceptions change over time. This paper uses data from a longitudinal oral health survey of community-dwelling Canadians aged 50 years and over to explore this issue. Data were collected at baseline and after 3 years. Change was assessed using a global transition judgement and change scores on four subjective oral health status indicators. These indicators addressed chewing capacity, oral and facial pain symptoms, other oral symptoms, and the psychosocial impact of oral disorders. Overall, 23.0% reported that their oral health had worsened over this period, 66.5% that it had remained the same and 10.5% that it had improved. Change scores on the four indicators showed a similar pattern and were significantly associated with these global judgements. Over the same period, substantial proportions lost one or more teeth, acquired new coronal or root DFS increments or experienced loss of periodontal attachment. An additional 17% complained of dry mouth. However, the only clinical indicator associated with changing perceptions of oral health was tooth loss. Of interest was the fact that rates of tooth loss were equally high among those who reported a worsening of oral health and those who reported an improvement. This suggests that the impact of tooth loss on health status may be positive or negative depending upon the condition of the teeth lost.
PubMed ID
9192147 View in PubMed
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Does dental care improve the oral health of older adults?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194251
Source
Community Dent Health. 2001 Mar;18(1):7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
D. Locker
Author Affiliation
Community Dental Health Services Research Unit, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Health. 2001 Mar;18(1):7-15
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Comprehensive Dental Care - classification - utilization
Dental Care - classification - utilization
Dental Records
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Life Style
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases - classification
Prospective Studies
Self Concept
Social Class
Statistics as Topic
Statistics, nonparametric
Stress, Psychological - classification
Tooth Diseases - classification
Abstract
To assess the relationship between self-perceived change in oral health status and the provision of dental treatment in an older adult population.
A longitudinal study with data collection at baseline and after three years. Information on change in oral health was obtained by interviews with study subjects and information on dental treatment over three years was obtained from subjects' dentists.
Nine hundred and seven subjects took part at baseline and 611 at follow-up. Of the latter, 495 reported at least one dental visit during the three-year observation period and dental treatment information was available for 408. Outcome measures Global transition judgements and change scores derived from four oral health indexes were used to assess change in oral health status.
Over the three-year period, one-tenth of subjects reported that their oral health had improved and one-fifth that it had deteriorated. Those who improved made significantly more dental visits and received significantly more dental services that those who deteriorated or did not change (P
PubMed ID
11421409 View in PubMed
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Gender and age differences in attitudes to dental pain and dental control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207770
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Aug;25(4):314-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
A. Liddell
D. Locker
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Canada. aliddell@morgan.ucs.mun.ca
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Aug;25(4):314-8
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Anxiety - psychology
Dental Care - psychology
Emotions
Fear
Female
Forecasting
Health Behavior
Humans
Internal-External Control
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pain - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sex Characteristics
Sex Factors
Abstract
In the literature, it is usual to find women and younger subjects reporting higher levels of dental anxiety than men and older subjects. Fear of pain was found to be the most important predictor of dental anxiety and issues of control were also related to such anxiety. Therefore, it was predicted that gender and age differences would be reflected in attitudes to pain and control. Subjects were randomly selected from the voters' list in metropolitan Toronto and mailed a questionnaire with a request for cooperation in a study of their thoughts, feelings, and behaviour regarding dental treatment. The questionnaire included demographic data, measures of dental anxiety and painful experiences as well as the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale and the Iowa Dental Control Index. The results supported the main predictions. In addition, attitudes to pain and control were found to be complex phenomena with characteristic gender differences.
PubMed ID
9332809 View in PubMed
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Issues in measuring change in self-perceived oral health status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206241
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;26(1):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
D. Locker
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;26(1):41-7
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Forecasting
Geriatric Assessment
Health Status Indicators
Health Transition
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Mastication
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Oral Health
Periodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology
Self-Assessment
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Toothache - epidemiology
Xerostomia - epidemiology
Abstract
An important goal of a health care intervention or system is to improve the health of an individual or a population. The challenge for health services research is to measure and explain this change. However, the issue of how changes in health status should be defined and measured has been given relatively little attention. This paper draws on the rather sparse literature to examine some issues involved in measuring changes in oral health status and illustrates these using data from a longitudinal study of the oral health of older adults. The paper draws a distinction between quantitative and qualitative change and the challenges involved with each. Four different ways of assessing change are reviewed and their strengths and weaknesses highlighted. Global transition judgements, although relatively simple measures of change, incorporate patients' values and avoid the statistical problems associated with measures such as change scores. Nevertheless, the measurement of change in oral health status is complex and controversial and no approach is universally accepted. Consequently, the decision as to which strategy to adopt is far from simple.
PubMed ID
9511841 View in PubMed
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Life circumstances, lifestyles and oral health among older Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206629
Source
Community Dent Health. 1997 Dec;14(4):214-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
D. Locker
A. Jokovic
B. Payne
Author Affiliation
Community Dental Health Services Research Unit, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Health. 1997 Dec;14(4):214-20
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
DMF Index
Dental Care
Dental Devices, Home Care
Diet, Cariogenic
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario
Oral Health
Periodontal Attachment Loss - classification
Poverty
Sex Factors
Social Class
Telephone
Tooth Loss - classification
Toothbrushing
Abstract
To examine the contribution of life circumstances and lifestyles, and the interaction between them, to the oral health status of older Canadians.
Subjects were recruited using a telephone interview survey, based on random digit dialling and subsequently interviewed and clinically examined.
Four hundred and ninety-eight dentate subjects aged 53 years and over living independently in Ontario, Canada.
Subjects were classified as living in deprived, middle or privileged life circumstances based on their social and personal attributes. They were also classified as having relatively poor or relatively favourable lifestyles based on their health behaviours. The oral health status indicators used were: the number of missing teeth, the number of decayed and filled root surfaces, mean periodontal attachment loss, the number of oral symptoms in the previous four weeks, self-rated oral health, and a psycho social impact score.
In bivariate analyses, life circumstances were significantly associated with three of these six indicators and lifestyles with five. Healthy lifestyles had an effect on the oral health status of those living in deprived and middle circumstances but not on the privileged, although no overall interaction effect was observed in multivariate analyses controlling for gender and age.
These data suggest that, among this population, life circumstances and lifestyles are both related to oral health. They also indicate that the role of these factors varies according to the condition and health indicator in question.
PubMed ID
9458578 View in PubMed
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Need and demand for sedation or general anesthesia in dentistry: a national survey of the Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175043
Source
Anesth Prog. 2005;52(1):3-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
B. Chanpong
D A Haas
D. Locker
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Anesth Prog. 2005;52(1):3-11
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anesthesia, Dental - economics - statistics & numerical data
Anesthesia, General - economics - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Conscious Sedation - economics - statistics & numerical data
Crowns
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology
Dental Care - psychology
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Fees, Dental
Humans
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Periodontal Diseases - surgery
Root Canal Therapy
Tooth Extraction
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the need and demand for sedation or general anesthesia (GA) for dentistry in the Canadian adult population. A national telephone survey of 1101 Canadians found that 9.8% were somewhat afraid of dental treatment, with another 5.5% having a high level of fear. Fear or anxiety was the reason why 7.6% had ever missed, cancelled, or avoided a dental appointment. Of those with high fear, 49.2% had avoided a dental appointment at some point because of fear or anxiety as opposed to only 5.2% from the no or low fear group. Regarding demand, 12.4% were definitely interested in sedation or GA for their dentistry and 42.3% were interested depending on cost. Of those with high fear, 31.1% were definitely interested, with 54.1% interested depending on cost. In a hypothetical situation where endodontics was required because of a severe toothache, 12.7% reported high fear. This decreased to 5.4% if sedation or GA were available. For this procedure, 20.4% were definitely interested in sedation or GA, and another 46.1% were interested depending on cost. The prevalence of, and preference for, sedation or GA was assessed for specific dental procedures. The proportion of the population with a preference for sedation or GA was 7.2% for cleaning, 18% for fillings or crowns, 54.7% for endodontics, 68.2% for periodontal surgery, and 46.5% for extraction. For each procedure, the proportion expressing a preference for sedation or GA was significantly greater than the proportion having received treatment with sedation or GA (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
15859442 View in PubMed
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The oral health status and treatment needs of adults aged 65+ living independently in Ottawa-Carleton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229519
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Mar-Apr;81(2):114-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
G D Slade
D. Locker
J L Leake
A S Wu
G. Dunkley
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Mar-Apr;81(2):114-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Oral Health
Sampling Studies
Stomatognathic Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
We report the findings from a dental survey of a random sample of 299 senior citizens living in Ottawa-Carleton. Those examined were younger, less likely to have a regular dentist, and more likely to have oro-facial pain, difficulty chewing, and to perceive a need to visit a dentist compared with those responding to the enrollment phone interview. Among the 65% of seniors who were dentate, 37% had dental decay; men and seniors with low incomes had more decay (p less than 0.05). Periodontal disease was worse among older seniors, men and poor seniors (p less than 0.05). One third of all seniors reported recent oro-facial pain, 50% had difficulty chewing foods and 30% reported some social impact resulting from their oral health. The resources required to treat the prevalent disorders were considerable and differences between dentate and edentulous people were negligible. Senior citizens expressed attitudes which indicate that they value dental health and would like help to achieve it.
PubMed ID
2331648 View in PubMed
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Risk indicators and risk markers for periodontal disease experience in older adults living independently in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222122
Source
J Dent Res. 1993 Jan;72(1):9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
D. Locker
J L Leake
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 1993 Jan;72(1):9-17
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Care - utilization
Educational Status
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Periodontal Index
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
This study examined risk indicators and risk markers for periodontal disease experience in 624 adults aged 50 years and over living independently in four communities in Ontario, Canada. The data were collected as part of the baseline phase of a longitudinal study of the oral health and treatment needs of this population. Periodontal disease experience was assessed in terms of attachment loss, measured at two sites on each remaining tooth. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationship between a number of sociodemographic, general health, psychosocial, and oral health variables and three indicators of periodontal disease experience. These were: mean attachment loss, the proportion of sites examined with loss of 2 mm or more, and the probability of the subjects having severe disease, arbitrarily defined as a mean attachment loss in the upper 20th percentile of the distribution. Mean attachment loss was 2.95 mm (SD = 1.41 mm), and 76.6% of sites examined had loss of 2 mm or more. In bivariate analyses, the most consistent predictors of periodontal disease experience were: age, education, income, smoking, dental visiting, the number of remaining teeth, the number of decayed coronal surfaces, and the number of decayed root surfaces. In multivariate analyses, age, education, current smoking status, and the number of teeth had the most consistent independent effects. These data confirm the results of recent US studies indicating that periodontal disease experience is influenced by social and behavioral factors.
PubMed ID
8418114 View in PubMed
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Using subjective oral health status indicators to screen for dental care needs in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210458
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Dec;24(6):398-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
D. Locker
A. Jokovic
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Dec;24(6):398-402
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Attitude to Health
Dental Care
Dental Prosthesis
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Mouth Diseases - psychology - surgery
Ontario - epidemiology
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Predictive value of tests
Self Concept
Sensitivity and specificity
Tooth Diseases - surgery
Abstract
A study was undertaken to assess the ability of a number of subjective oral health status indicators to identify community-dwelling older adults who need dental treatment. The indicators consisted of a single-item self-rating of treatment need, a 15-item psychosocial impact index and the 49-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP). Data for the study were collected as part of an oral health survey of Canadians aged 50 years and over. The associations between these subjective indicators and clinically defined dental treatment needs were assessed using statistics for determining the predictive power of a diagnostic test. Although there were statistically significant associations between the subjective and clinical measures, values for statistics such as sensitivity, positive predictive values and positive likelihood ratios were low. Although the measures did not perform well as screening tests, they did identify a sub-group of individuals whose clinical conditions impacted significantly on daily life and who would probably benefit the most from dental treatment. In this respect, the subjective measures assessed here can themselves be interpreted as indicators of need which complement conventional clinical measures of needs for dental care.
PubMed ID
9007357 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.