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Source
Can Nurse. 2005 May;101(5):4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Lenora Brace
Source
Can Nurse. 2005 May;101(5):4
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Canada
Humans
Living Wills
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Notes
Comment On: Can Nurse. 2005 Apr;101(4):415974277
PubMed ID
16035509 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absorbing information about a child's incurable cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96768
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Patrizia Lannen
Joanne Wolfe
Jennifer Mack
Erik Onelov
Ullakarin Nyberg
Ulrika Kreicbergs
Author Affiliation
Phyllis F. Cantor Center, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Death
Bereavement
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
Parents
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess parents' ability to absorb information that their child's cancer was incurable and to identify factors associated with parents' ability to absorb this information. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An anonymous mail-in questionnaire study was performed as a population-based investigation in Sweden between August and October of 2001. 449 parents who lost a child to cancer 4-9 years earlier (response rate 80%) completed the survey. 191 (43%) of the bereaved parents were fathers and 251 (56%) were mothers. RESULTS: Sixty percent of parents (n = 258) reported that they were able to absorb the information that their child's illness was incurable. Parents were better able to absorb this information when the information was given in an appropriate manner (RR 1.6; CI 1.3-2.0), when they shared their problems with others during the child's illness course (RR 1.4; CI 1.1-1.8) and when they had no history of depression (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.8). Parents who reported that they were able to absorb the information were more likely to have expressed their farewells to the child in their desired manner (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Parents who received information that their child's illness was incurable in an appropriate manner are more likely to absorb that information. Whether or not parents are able to absorb the information that their child's cancer is incurable has implications in terms of preparation for the child's impending death.
PubMed ID
20523086 View in PubMed
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Addressing myths about end-of-life care: research into the use of acute care hospitals over the last five years of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190268
Source
J Palliat Care. 2002;18(1):29-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Donna M Wilson
Corrine D Truman
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2002;18(1):29-38
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Female
Health Services Research
Hospital Bed Capacity - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Terminal Care - statistics & numerical data - trends - utilization
Abstract
Despite very little confirming evidence, one of the most pervasive beliefs about dying is that terminally ill people receive a great deal of health care in the last few days, weeks, or months of life. A secondary analysis of 1992/93 through 1996/97 Alberta inpatient hospital abstracts data was undertaken to explore and describe hospital use over the five years before death by all Albertans who died in acute care hospital beds during the 1996/97 year (n = 7,429). There were four key findings: (1) hospital use varied, but was most often low, (2) the last hospital stay was infrequently resource intensive, (3) age, gender, and illness did not distinguish use, and (4) most ultra-high users were rural residents, with the majority of care episodes taking place in small, rural hospitals.
PubMed ID
12001400 View in PubMed
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Adolescent coping with grief after the death of a loved one.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190272
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2002 Jun;8(3):137-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Katja Rask
Marja Kaunonen
Marita Paunonen-Ilmonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Finland. katja.rask@mail.diak.fi
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2002 Jun;8(3):137-42
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Death
Bereavement
Female
Finland
Grief
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Social Support
Abstract
The purpose of this article was to describe adolescent coping after the death of a loved one. Data were obtained by two self-report questionnaires filled in by 14-16-year-old pupils in two secondary schools in Finland. The sample consisted of 89 adolescents (70% girls) who had each experienced the death of a loved one. The instrument used in the study was developed by Hogan and DeSantis. The article reports the responses to two open-ended questions. The data were analyzed using content analysis. The most important factors that helped adolescents cope with grief were self-help and support from parents, relatives and friends. However, the official social support system was not experienced as very helpful. No one reported help, for example, from school health services. According to the adolescents, fear of death, a sense of loneliness and intrusive thoughts were factors that hindered coping with grief. Some respondents felt that parents or friends were an additional burden on them. The results are discussed in terms of identifying the different impact of social support, the importance of self-help and professional help. Knowledge of factors that have an effect on adolescent coping with bereavement is important for families, effective nursing practice, school health services and parents.
PubMed ID
12000632 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' attitudes toward suicide, and a suicidal peer: a comparison between Swedish and Turkish high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68490
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1995 Jun;36(2):201-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
M. Eskin
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1995 Jun;36(2):201-7
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Death
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Values
Students - psychology
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
Turkey
Abstract
The present paper first presents the attitudes toward suicide and a suicidal classmate among 98 female and 69 male (N = 167) Swedish high school students. Secondly, the Swedish sample was compared with 167 (89 female and 78 male) Turkish high school students from a previous study. Among Swedish students, more males than females said that people have the right to commit suicide and suicide can be a solution to some problems. More females than males expressed a belief in life after death. Swedish adolescents were found to be holding more liberal attitudes toward suicide than Turkish adolescents. However, Turkish adolescents showed greater acceptance for a suicidal peer than Swedish adolescents. The results are discussed in terms of socio-cultural factors and related literature. The need for educational programs to provide basic knowledge about suicide and, effective ways of dealing with and helping suicidal peers is implicated.
PubMed ID
7644900 View in PubMed
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Advance Care Planning in Norwegian nursing homes-Who is it for?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280817
Source
J Aging Stud. 2016 Aug;38:16-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Lisbeth Thoresen
Rolf Ahlzén
Kari Nyheim Solbrække
Source
J Aging Stud. 2016 Aug;38:16-26
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Care Planning
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Norway
Nurses - psychology
Nursing Homes
Physicians - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
Advance care planning (ACP) is an international concept for improving patient autonomy and communication in the context of anticipated deterioration and end-of-life care. In a preparatory conversation, health care professionals facilitate one or more conversations where nursing home residents are invited to reflect on, and articulate wishes and preferences concerning future medical treatment and end-of-life care. Our aim with this study was to increase knowledge of existing ACP practices in Norwegian nursing homes. We wanted to know how nursing home residents, relatives and nursing home staff take part in the conversations, and to what extent these conversations can be regarded as promoting autonomy, legal rights and individual needs for the residents. We conducted participant observation of seven preparatory conversations, followed by interviews with health care staff (together) and resident and relative (together). In the result section, we present an informative case example of an ACP conversation where common and important characteristics running through our data are present. These are further elaborated under the following headings: Life critical questions, Residents' quiet participation in the conversations, the Dying phase - a clinical issue, Nurses and physicians; different domains and Timing. We find that nursing home staff in our study wants to contribute to open awareness, autonomy and a good death, but there are little reflections about the purpose and content of the conversations, how they should be carried out and when, and what frail nursing home residents are able to understand and express in ACP conversations.
PubMed ID
27531449 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Mar 10;113(7):872-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1993
Author
K. Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling Regionsykehuset i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Mar 10;113(7):872-5
Date
Mar-10-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
8480301 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A "good death" needs to be discussed. A study of patients with acute myeloid leukemia demonstrates the value of palliative care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17983
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Dec 4;100(49):4072-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-4-2003
Author
Ann Marie Stalfelt
Author Affiliation
Hematologiska sektionen, medicinkliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Orebro. annmarie.stalfelt@orebroll.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Dec 4;100(49):4072-7
Date
Dec-4-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Death
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - drug therapy - nursing - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - methods - standards
Quality of Life
Retrospective Studies
Social Support
Terminal Care - methods - standards
Abstract
The incidence of AML in Sweden is 5.4/100,000, i.e. 300 persons a year. About 70% of the patients die from their disease. In a retrospective study of medical journals of 106 patients with AML, who had died 1995-1997 in five selected hospitals in Sweden, the last week in life was studied. Sixty-six women and 40 men (age 19-84, mean 67) were included and 658 days of care were documented. The cause of death, the place of death, the type of care and clinical problems and symptoms were registered. We found bleeding (44%), infection (71%), pain (76%) and respiratory (59%) and psychological (64%) problems. Next of kin were often present and during the last week in life 3/4 of the patients had palliative care focusing on symptom relief and quality of life for the patients and his/her family.
PubMed ID
14717071 View in PubMed
Less detail

AIDS, hospice and volunteers. The Casey House volunteer program. A case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221690
Source
J Volunt Adm. 1992;10(4):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992

506 records – page 1 of 51.