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[A computer professor questions computerization: the projects will become institutions which no-one can evaluate]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68972
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jan 22;94(4):204-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-1997
Author
H. Fällman
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jan 22;94(4):204-6
Date
Jan-22-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Computers
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Evaluation Studies
Medical Informatics
Sweden
Telemedicine
PubMed ID
9053640 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adopting information technology in hospitals: the relationship between attitudes/expectations and behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217142
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1994;39(3):369-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M. Hebert
I. Benbasat
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1994;39(3):369-83
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude to Computers
Communication
Diffusion of Innovation
Hospital Bed Capacity, 300 to 499
Humans
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Design
Technology Transfer
Abstract
The purpose of this field study was to measure the influence of three factors on the adoption of information technology in a health care setting--namely, attitudes toward using the technology, subjective norms or beliefs about others' expectations, and perceived voluntariness. Approximately 77 percent of the variance of intent to use the technology was explained by three attitude variables (beliefs related to perceived relative advantage and compatibility with previous work patterns as well as result demonstrability), and one variable associated with subjective norms (influence of a senior policymaker, the director of nursing). Use of this model may provide insights for administrators managing the process of information technology implementation in health care.
PubMed ID
10137056 View in PubMed
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Adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme in psychiatric hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129777
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Dec;18(10):914-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
M. Anttila
M. Välimäki
M. Koivunen
T. Luukkaala
M. Kaila
A. Pitkänen
R. Kontio
Author Affiliation
Finnish Post-Graduate School in Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland. minna.anttila@utu.fi
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Dec;18(10):914-23
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Finland
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Program Evaluation - methods
Psychiatric Nursing - methods
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Internet-based patient support systems are widely assumed to predict a future trend in patient education. Coherent information is still lacking on how patient education is adopted in psychiatric hospitals and how information technology is used in it. Our aim was to describe nurses' adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme and the variables explaining it. The study was based on Rogers' model of the diffusion of innovation. The Internet-based patient education sessions were carried out by nurses on nine acute psychiatric inpatient wards in two Finnish hospitals. They were evaluated with reports and analysed statistically. Out of 100 nurses, 83 adopted the programme during the study period. The nurses fell into Rogers' groups, late majority (72%), laggards (17%), early majority (7%), early adopters (3%) and innovators (1%). Three groups were formed according to their activity: laggards, late majority, adopters (including early majority, early adopters, innovators). There was a statistical difference between the nurses' programme adoption between the two hospitals (P= 0.045): more laggards (65% vs. 35%) and adopters (73% vs. 27%) in the same hospital. The findings help to provide insight into the contexts and settings when adopting information technology programmes in the area of mental health care.
PubMed ID
22070578 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent discrepancies between computerized and paper cognitive testing in patients with schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155946
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 Jan;44(1):73-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Sylvain Grignon
Claire-Anne Grégoire
Myriam Durand
Marie Mury
Dominique Elie
Jean Marc Chianetta
Author Affiliation
Dépt. de psychiatrie, CHUS Hôtel Dieu, Sherbrooke, QC, J1G 2E8, Canada. sylvain.grignon@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 Jan;44(1):73-7
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attitude to Computers
Case-Control Studies
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis
Computer Literacy
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Schizophrenia
Schizophrenic Psychology
User-Computer Interface
Young Adult
Abstract
Computer-based cognitive testing is gaining in popularity because of desirable features such as ease of use, standardized administration and online data acquisition. Information technology and computer familiarity are clearly influenced by age in the general population, but the impact of this situation on cognitive testing of patients with schizophrenia has received little attention. In the present paper, participants underwent cognitive testing with computer and paper versions of the same tests. Patients underperformed controls by 1.36 DS (paper tests) and 2.27 DS (computer tests) after controlling for education. Results were highly correlated but patients with schizophrenia were disproportionately impaired on computer tests compared with their paper counterparts. Moreover, for subtests implying active keyboard input from the participant, the difference between paper and computer scores correlated with age in patients, a pattern that was not found in controls. These results have methodological implications because of the implied risk of measuring (lack of) computer proficiency in addition to bona fide cognitive deficits. They confirm, moreover, that patients with schizophrenia are victims of the "digital divide", which adds to the potential benefits of approaches like computer assisted cognitive remediation in this population.
PubMed ID
18661086 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory electronic medical records for large practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158378
Source
Healthc Q. 2008;11(1):122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Jared Peterson
Stacilee Whiting
Author Affiliation
KLAS, Orem, Utah, USA.
Source
Healthc Q. 2008;11(1):122-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities - organization & administration
Ambulatory Care Information Systems - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Canada
Diffusion of Innovation
Efficiency, Organizational
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - utilization
Abstract
In summary, providers and vendors alike have made great strides in EMR adoption among physicians in large-scale ambulatory practices. However, there is still work to be done in the areas of physician use, adoption obstacles, workflow and physician satisfaction. As vendors continue to enhance EMR technology, advance workflow and solve challenges with integration and physician acceptance, adoption will grow and providers will be even closer to their specific efficiency, safety and effectiveness goals.
PubMed ID
18326390 View in PubMed
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An adaptation of the theory of interpersonal behaviour to the study of telemedicine adoption by physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183487
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2003 Sep;71(2-3):103-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Marie-Pierre Gagnon
Gaston Godin
Camille Gagné
Jean-Paul Fortin
Lise Lamothe
Daniel Reinharz
Alain Cloutier
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Pavillon de l'Est 2180, Chemin Ste-Foy, QC, G1K 7P4 Quebec, Canada. marie-pierre.gagnon@ext.msp.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2003 Sep;71(2-3):103-15
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Diffusion of Innovation
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Intention
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Physicians - psychology
Psychometrics
Quebec
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Telemedicine - utilization
Abstract
Physicians' acceptance of telemedicine constitutes a prerequisite for its diffusion on a national scale. Based upon the Theory of Interpersonal Behavior, this study was aimed at assessing the predictors of physicians' intention to use telemedicine in their clinical practice. All of the physicians involved in the RQTE, the extended provincial telemedicine network of Quebec (Canada) were mailed a questionnaire to identify the psychosocial determinants of their intention to adopt telemedicine. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed to assess the measurement model and structural equation modelling (SEM) was applied to test the theoretical model. The adapted theoretical model explained 81% (P
PubMed ID
14519403 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the debate on the general practice list system on the Eyr]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71778
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3509-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2001
Author
H. Sandvik
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisinske fag Universitetet i Bergen Ulriksdal 8 c 5009 Bergen. hogne.sandvik@isf.uib.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3509-12
Date
Dec-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Computer Communication Networks - utilization
English Abstract
Family Practice - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians, Family - psychology
Physicians, Women - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The most heavily discussed subject on Eyr, the Norwegian mailing list for general practitioners, has been the introduction of a general practice list system (GPLS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: All messages in the GPLS debate were recorded from its start in August 1996 up until the GPLS was introduced nationwide in June 2001. RESULTS: During this period, 243 different persons posted 2,153 messages about the GPLS, 232 of the participants were physicians, 203 of them GPs. Mean age was 46 years; males were strongly overrepresented (87%). 80% of the participants posted ten or fewer messages, 10% posted 11-20 messages, and 10% posted more than 20 messages. GPs sent most of their messages in the evenings, academics and public health officers sent most of their messages during work hours. Mean length of the messages was 179 words, 72% were responses to earlier messages. Most of the messages were neutral regarding the GPLS, 207 (9.6%) were negative, and 181 (8.4%) positive. Academics, public health officers, and participants in a GPLS trial were heavily overrepresented with positive messages. INTERPRETATION: It is concluded that this debate has been fairly balanced. Participation greatly exceeded what would have been possible in traditional media.
PubMed ID
11808009 View in PubMed
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An easy to use and affordable home-based personal eHealth system for chronic disease management based on free open source software.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93163
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2008;136:83-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Burkow Tatjana M
Vognild Lars K
Krogstad Trine
Borch Njål
Ostengen Geir
Bratvold Astrid
Risberg Marijke Jongsma
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Telemedicine, UNN, Tromsø, Norway. tatjana.m.burkow@telemed.no
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2008;136:83-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Computers
Chronic Disease - economics - rehabilitation
Computer Security
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - rehabilitation
Female
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based
Humans
Internet
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Microcomputers
Middle Aged
Norway
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - rehabilitation
Remote Consultation
Self Care
Self-Help Groups
Software
Television
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
This paper describes an easy to use home-based eHealth system for chronic disease management. We present the design and implementation of a prototype for home based education, exercises, treatment and following-up, with the TV and a remote control as user interface. We also briefly describe field trials of the system for patients with COPD and diabetes, and their experience with the technology.
PubMed ID
18487712 View in PubMed
Less detail

An investigation of factors influencing healthcare workers' use and acceptance of e-learning in post-school healthcare education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148615
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;150:893-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Marius Mikalsen
Ståle Walderhaug
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Information and Communication Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Marius.Mikalsen@sintef.no
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;150:893-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Data Collection
Diffusion of Innovation
Education, Distance
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Norway
Nurses
Abstract
The objective of the study presented here was to perform an empirical investigation on factors affecting healthcare workers acceptance and utilisation of e-learning in post-school healthcare education. E-learning benefits are realised when key features of e-learning are not only applied, but deemed useful, compatible with the learning process and supportive in order to reach the overall goals of the learning process. We conducted a survey of 14 state-enrolled nurses and skilled-workers within the field of healthcare in Norway. The results show that perceived compatibility and subjective norm explain system usage of the e-learning tool amongst the students. We found that the fact that the students considered the e-learning to be compatible with the course in question had a positive effect on e-learning tool usage. We also found support for factors such as facilitating conditions and ease of use leads to the e-learning tool being considered useful.
PubMed ID
19745441 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assistive computing devices: a pilot study to explore nurses' preferences and needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166500
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2006 Nov-Dec;24(6):328-36
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alex Mihailidis
Laura Krones
Jennifer Boger
Author Affiliation
Intelligent Assistive Technology and Systems Laboratory, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. alex.mihailidis@utoronto.ca
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2006 Nov-Dec;24(6):328-36
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Clinical Pharmacy Information Systems
Computers, Handheld - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Support Systems, Clinical
Drug Information Services
Drug Therapy - nursing
Drug Therapy, Computer-Assisted
Female
Humans
Needs Assessment
Numerical Analysis, Computer-Assisted
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Reminder Systems
Safety Management
Abstract
Healthcare errors among nurses are common because of the fast-paced work environment, in which extensive data must be analyzed and quick decision making is required. Assistive computing devices can help reduce nursing errors by providing timely access to client information and by assisting nurses with client monitoring, decision making, and bedside documentation. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine what assistive computing device features, functions, and input/output modalities nurses would find most useful as support for their nursing duties. Twenty nurses completed a questionnaire that examined their needs and preferences. Data analysis revealed a strong desire for capabilities related to facilitating information access and administering safe medication. The results of this study will be used to develop design criteria for an assistive computing device that will aim to improve the performance of nurses through appropriate information and data support.
PubMed ID
17108752 View in PubMed
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181 records – page 1 of 19.