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Acculturation and socialization: voices of internationally educated nurses in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77756
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Sochan A.
Singh M D
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health, York University, York, Canada. asochan@yorku.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
China - ethnology
Communication
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Education, Professional, Retraining
Emigration and Immigration
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
India - ethnology
Korea - ethnology
Licensure, Nursing
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Philippines - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Socialization
Ukraine - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This paper describes a study that explores the experiences of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in their efforts to gain entry to practice as Registered Nurses (RNs) in the province of Ontario, Canada. AIM: The aim was to uncover, in part, the issues related to professional nursing credentialling. METHODS: This study was guided by a biographical narrative (qualitative) research methodology. A convenience sample of 12 IEN students volunteered for this study representing the Philippines, Mainland China, Korea, Ukraine and India. FINDINGS: The findings were that the IENs progress through a three-phase journey in their quest for licensure in Ontario. These phases include: (1) hope - wanting the Canadian dream of becoming an RN in Ontario; (2) disillusionment - discovering that their home-country nursing qualifications do not meet Ontario RN entry to practice; and (3) navigating disillusionment - living the redefined Canadian dream by returning to nursing school to upgrade their nursing qualifications. CONCLUSIONS: Professional regulatory nursing bodies and nursing educators, as well as practising nurses, must be aware of the potentially confusing and unpleasant processes IENs go through as they qualify for the privilege of practising nursing in Ontario.
PubMed ID
17492985 View in PubMed
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Acute pain and use of local anesthesia: tooth drilling and childbirth labor pain beliefs among Anglo-Americans, Chinese, and Scandinavians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52621
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Moore
I. Brødsgaard
T K Mao
M L Miller
S F Dworkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-6370, USA. roding@u.washington.edu
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia, Local - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Dental Cavity Preparation
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Taiwan
United States
Abstract
Differences in ethnic beliefs about the perceived need for local anesthesia for tooth drilling and childbirth labor were surveyed among Anglo-Americans, Mandarin Chinese, and Scandinavians (89 dentists and 251 patients) matched for age, gender, and occupation. Subjects matched survey questionnaire items selected from previously reported interview results to estimate (a) their beliefs about the possible use of anesthetic for tooth drilling and labor pain compared with other possible remedies and (b) the choice of pain descriptors associated with the use of nonuse of anesthetic, including descriptions of injection pain. Multidimensional scaling, Gamma, and Chi-square statistics as well as odds ratios and Spearman's correlations were employed in the analysis. Seventy-seven percent of American informants reported the use of anesthetics as possible remedies for drilling and 51% reported the use of anesthetics for labor pain compared with 34% that reported the use of anesthetics among Chinese for drilling and 5% for labor pain and 70% among Scandinavians for drilling and 35% for labor pain. Most Americans and Swedes described tooth-drilling sensations as sharp, most Chinese used descriptors such as sharp and "sourish" (suan), and most Danes used words like shooting (jagende). By rank, Americans described labor pain as cramping, sharp, and excruciating, Chinese used words like sharp, intermittent, and horrible, Danes used words like shooting, tiring, and sharp, and Swedes used words like tiring, "good," yet horrible. Preferred pain descriptors for drilling, birth, and injection pains varied significantly by ethnicity. Results corroborated conclusions of a qualitative study about pain beliefs in relation to perceived needs for anesthetic in tooth drilling. Samples used to obtain the results were estimated to approach qualitative representativity for these urban ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
9790007 View in PubMed
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An international comparative multicenter study of assessment of dental appearance using computer-aided image manipulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33734
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
G E Carlsson
I V Wagner
P. Odman
K. Ekstrand
M. MacEntee
C. Marinello
T. Nanami
R K Ow
H. Sato
C. Speer
J R Strub
T. Watanabe
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Göteborg University, Sweden. g_carlsson@odontologi.gu.se
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dental Technicians - psychology
Dentists - psychology
Esthetics, Dental - psychology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of the present investigation was to perform an international multicenter comparison of dental appearance as evaluated by dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants were drawn from three groups: 203 dentists, 197 dental technicians and 254 nondental subjects. The methods developed in a previous study in Sweden were applied again in seven centers located in six countries. A questionnaire, accompanied by five sets of computer-manipulated images portraying one man and one woman, was used to prompt and record responses to different aspects of dental appearance and function. RESULTS: The questionnaire revealed that both the dental appearance and function of teeth were important to most of the participants, but three quarters of the participants did indicate that good dental function was more important that esthetics. More women (30%) than men (18%), however, placed greater importance on appearance. Age or gender did not influence judgments of the computer-manipulated images, although judgments did vary greatly within the three groups and between the centers. Nonetheless, highly colored teeth were preferred more often by nondental subjects than by dentists or dental technicians. CONCLUSION: Computer-aided image manipulation shows promise as a method for investigating the significance of dental-related beliefs, especially those relating to esthetics, in different population groups. The evaluation of dental appearance and function in this study indicated that dental function is held in greater regard, and that the significance of dental appearance varies widely among dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects.
PubMed ID
9728119 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of Finnish doctors towards euthanasia in 1993 and 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166829
Source
J Med Ethics. 2006 Nov;32(11):627-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
P. Louhiala
H-M Hilden
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. pekka.louhiala@helsinki.fi
Source
J Med Ethics. 2006 Nov;32(11):627-8
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Euthanasia - psychology
Finland
Humans
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Sep 13;327(7415):595-612969926
PubMed ID
17074818 View in PubMed
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Attitudes toward aging: implications for a caring profession.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149477
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Jul;48(7):374-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Ann Holroyd
Sherry Dahlke
Cindy Fehr
Piera Jung
Andrea Hunter
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Island University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Jul;48(7):374-80
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing - education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Negativism
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Statistics, nonparametric
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
With the predicted increase in the age of Canada's overall population, it is estimated that by 2020, up to 75% of nurses' time will be spent with older adults. It is recognized that care of older adults occurs in a cultural context in which the older members of society are poorly valued, often referred to as ageism. Based on the premise that attitudes affect behavior and knowledge acquisition, a comparative cross-sectional study using the Attitudes Toward Old People scale measured nursing students' attitudes at different points in a baccalaureate nursing program. Although analysis of variance revealed no significant differences in students' attitudes during the 4 years, post hoc analysis revealed a drop in positive attitudes and a rise in negative attitudes at the beginning of the second and fourth years of the baccalaureate program.
PubMed ID
19634262 View in PubMed
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Attitudinal patterns determining decision-making in severely ill elderly patients: a cross-cultural comparison between nurses from Sweden and Germany.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71901
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2001 Aug;38(4):381-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
J. Richter
M R Eisemann
Author Affiliation
Department and University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Rostock University, Gehlsheimer Str. 20, 18147 Rostock, Germany. joerg.richter@med.uni-rostock.de
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2001 Aug;38(4):381-8
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Advance Directives
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Decision Making
Dementia - classification - complications - therapy
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Germany
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mental Competency
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Patient Advocacy
Questionnaires
Resuscitation Orders
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Abstract
To explain determinants in the decision-making of nurses in the treatment of severely ill incompetent patients and to describe underlying attitudes, consecutive samples of nurses from Germany and Sweden have been investigated by means of a case scenario and a questionnaire. Whereas the level of dementia emerged as the only factor being significantly related with the treatment option within the Swedish group, patient's age, patient's wishes and ethical concerns were correlated among German nurses. The more the nurses have been able to participate in the provision of the available do-not-resuscitate order or of an advance directive, the less frequent they would perform CPR against the patient's wishes.
PubMed ID
11470096 View in PubMed
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Bridging obstacles to transcultural caring relationships--tools discovered through interviews with staff in pediatric oncology care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86530
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2008 Feb;12(1):35-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Pergert Pernilla
Ekblad Solvig
Enskär Karin
Björk Olle
Author Affiliation
Department of Woman and Child Health, Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital/Solna Q6:05, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. pernilla.pergert@ki.se
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2008 Feb;12(1):35-43
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Child
Communication Barriers
Cultural Competency
Cultural Diversity
Emigration and Immigration
Empathy
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Neoplasms - ethnology - nursing
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Oncologic Nursing - education - methods
Pediatric Nursing - education - methods
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology
Transcultural Nursing - education - methods
Abstract
In this qualitative study we explored how health-care staff continuously resolve "obstacles to transcultural caring relationships" as they care for families with an immigrant background within the context of pediatric oncology care. A constant comparative method was used and data collection included 5 focus group interviews and 5 complementary individual interviews with health-care staff within pediatric oncology care. Bridging emerged as the way that health-care staff deal with obstacles to transcultural caring relationships. Bridging is a process in which various tools may be used and combined, including communicational tools, transcultural tools and organizational tools. Failure to use tools, or to use and combine them insufficiently, can bring the caring relationship to a halt, which leads to inequity in care. In order to ensure the provision of high-quality care despite differences in religion, culture, language and social situation, health-care staff need to bridge obstacles to transcultural caring relationships.
PubMed ID
18218338 View in PubMed
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Caring and Uncaring Encounters between Assistant Nurses and Immigrants with Dementia Symptoms in Two Group Homes in Sweden-an Observational Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301157
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2018 Sep; 33(3):299-317
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Sep-2018
Author
Mirkka Söderman
Sirpa Rosendahl
Christina Sällström
Author Affiliation
School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Box 325, SE-63105, Eskilstuna, Sweden. mirkka.soderman@mdh.se.
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2018 Sep; 33(3):299-317
Date
Sep-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Communication
Communication Barriers
Cultural Competency
Dementia - diagnosis - nursing - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Geriatric Nursing
Group Homes - organization & administration
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The total number of people with dementia symptoms is expected to double every 20 years and there will also be an increase in the number of older immigrants in several countries. There are considerable deficiencies in the present knowledge of how to conduct well-functioning health care for immigrants with dementia symptoms. The aim of this study was to explore caring and uncaring encounters between assistant nurses and immigrants in two group homes for persons with dementia symptoms in Sweden: a Finnish-speaking as well as a Swedish-speaking context. In addition, this study aims to describe how caring and uncaring encounters are manifested in these two contexts according to Halldórsdóttir's theory of "Caring and Uncaring encounters".
Descriptive field notes from 30 separate observations were analyzed using qualitative deductive content analysis.
The main category "caring encounters" focused on reaching out to initiate connection through communication, removing masks of anonymity by acknowledging the unique person, acknowledgment of connection by being personal. Reaching a level of truthfulness by being present and showing respect, raising the level of solidarity by equality and true negotiation of care, based on the residents' needs. The main category, uncaring encounters, focused on disinterest in and insensitivity towards the other, coldness in the connection and lack of humanity in care situations. The observations showed that caring encounters occurred more in the Finnish-speaking context and uncaring encounters more often in the Swedish context.
Encounters could be caring, uncaring, and carried out using a person-centered approach. Communication and relationships could be facilitated using the same language but also through learning to interpret residents' needs and desires.
PubMed ID
29931458 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Nurse. 2006 Apr;102(4):22-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Valerie Arnault-Pelletier
Sandra Brown
Joyce Desjarlais
Bev McBeth
Author Affiliation
Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan, College of Nursing/SIAST Nursing Division, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
Source
Can Nurse. 2006 Apr;102(4):22-6
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Education Research
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Saskatchewan
School Admission Criteria
Students, Nursing
Training Support - organization & administration
Transcultural Nursing - education - organization & administration
Abstract
In 1984, the college of nursing at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S), the First Nations University of Canada and the University of Regina, with funding from Health Canada, established the National Native Access Program to Nursing (NNAPN). This program promoted nursing to aboriginal people, negotiated access seats for aboriginal students at all Canadian universities and offered a nine-week spring orientation program intended to prepare aboriginal students for the demands of campus life and nursing programs. A restructuring of the program in 1997 made it provincial in scope, becoming NAPN, which focuses on the recruitment, support and retention of aboriginal nursing students at the U of S's Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan (NEPS). Currently, more than 200 self-identified aboriginal students are enrolled in NEPS. All aboriginal students are encouraged to access the NAPN services and to become involved in NAPN activities. NAPN advisers strive for success and excellence for aboriginal nursing students through support and advocacy (personal issues, social services, individual funding, academic assistance, advocacy with faculty), summer employment assistance, recruitment efforts and community partnerships (including community-building activities among the students and building partnerships with outside stakeholders, both First Nations and non-First Nations).
PubMed ID
16734349 View in PubMed
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Clinician/patient connections in ethnoculturally nonconcordant encounters with political-asylum seekers: a comparison of physicians and nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172890
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Oct;16(4):298-311
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Peter H Koehn
Kirsti Sainola-Rodriguez
Author Affiliation
University of Montana, USA.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Oct;16(4):298-311
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Clinical Competence - standards
Dissent and Disputes
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Male
Medical Staff - education - psychology - standards
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology - standards
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Refugees - psychology
Transcultural Nursing - education - standards
Abstract
The article compares the ability of nurses and physicians to connect with patients in ethnoculturally nonconcordant clinical encounters with 41 randomly selected political-asylum seekers (PAS) residing at five Finnish reception centers in summer 2002. Doctors and nurses were equally unlikely to draw congruent assessments of the patient's past and present health condition, mixed use of biomedical/ethnocultural practices, adherence with medication and eat/drink instructions, (dis)satisfaction, and future confidence in recommended biomedical and ethnocultural approaches. Nurses were considerably more likely to hold views that were congruent with the patient's reported health care effectiveness in Finland. The findings suggest that doctors should request and place special weight on the insights of the principal attending nurse when assessing the potential contributions of personal, family, and host-society health care assets and inhibitors to a migrant patient's overall health plan. The results also suggest that culturally sensitive health care training offers specific advantages to nurses who attend to PAS.
PubMed ID
16160192 View in PubMed
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79 records – page 1 of 8.