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The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of a faecal occult blood screening protocol for carcinoma of the colon in family practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236220
Source
Fam Pract. 1986 Dec;3(4):246-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
J F Sangster
T M Gerace
M J Bass
Source
Fam Pract. 1986 Dec;3(4):246-50
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Colonic Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control
Diagnostic Errors
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Occult Blood
Ontario
Abstract
Cancer of the colon is the second most common malignancy in North America and screening methods are needed for diagnosing the lesions at an early stage. Faecal occult blood screening is a method of secondary prevention which is particularly adaptable to the family practice setting. In order to test the feasibility of using this test in family practice, 16 family physicians participated in a trial screening programme using the Hemoccult II test. During the two-month trial 776 patients over 40 years of age were screened; 19 of the tests were positive but in two cases patients were thought to have failed to follow dietary and medical restrictions. Of the 17 patients with verified positive tests, further investigation showed five patients had neoplastic disease and three of these had malignant disease. The detection rate for cancer of the colon using the Hemoccult II test was therefore 3/776, equivalent to 3.9 per 1000 cases screened. By narrowing the age range for screening patients to between 45 and 75 years, the time involved to screen the population at risk could be decreased.
PubMed ID
3803770 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of a wearable hand hygiene device with monitoring capabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155144
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2008 Nov;70(3):216-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
V M Boscart
K S McGilton
A. Levchenko
G. Hufton
P. Holliday
G R Fernie
Author Affiliation
Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. boscart.veronique@torontorehab.on.ca
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2008 Nov;70(3):216-22
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Electronics
Female
Focus Groups
Gels - administration & dosage
Hand Disinfection
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Infection Control - instrumentation - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Reminder Systems - instrumentation
Abstract
Transmisssion of infection within healthcare institutions is a significant threat to patients and staff. One of the most effective means of prevention is good hand hygiene. A research team at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Ontario, Canada, developed a wearable hand disinfection system with monitoring capabilities to enhance hand wash frequency. We present the findingsof the first phase of a larger study addressing the hypothesis that an electronic hand hygiene system with monitoring and reminding propertieswill increase hand hygiene compliance. This first phase focused on the acceptability and usability of the wearable electronic hand wash device ina clinical environment. The feedback from healthcare staff to the first prototype has provided evidence for the research team to continue with the development of this technology.
Notes
Erratum In: J Hosp Infect. 2009 Apr;71(4):389
PubMed ID
18799234 View in PubMed
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The accessibility and availability of dental care to ill, elderly and handicapped residents of Simcoe County. A summary of methodology and results of the 1986 survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234301
Source
Can J Community Dent. 1988;3(1):22-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

Access to care for seniors -- dental concerns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192958
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Oct;67(9):504-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
M F Marvin
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Dental Program for the North Bay and District Dental Society.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Oct;67(9):504-6
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Canada
Dental Care for Aged - economics - psychology - utilization
Financing, Government
Health Education, Dental
Health Services Accessibility
Health Transition
Humans
Ontario
Societies, Dental
PubMed ID
11597341 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and socialization: voices of internationally educated nurses in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77756
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Sochan A.
Singh M D
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health, York University, York, Canada. asochan@yorku.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
China - ethnology
Communication
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Education, Professional, Retraining
Emigration and Immigration
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
India - ethnology
Korea - ethnology
Licensure, Nursing
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Philippines - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Socialization
Ukraine - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This paper describes a study that explores the experiences of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in their efforts to gain entry to practice as Registered Nurses (RNs) in the province of Ontario, Canada. AIM: The aim was to uncover, in part, the issues related to professional nursing credentialling. METHODS: This study was guided by a biographical narrative (qualitative) research methodology. A convenience sample of 12 IEN students volunteered for this study representing the Philippines, Mainland China, Korea, Ukraine and India. FINDINGS: The findings were that the IENs progress through a three-phase journey in their quest for licensure in Ontario. These phases include: (1) hope - wanting the Canadian dream of becoming an RN in Ontario; (2) disillusionment - discovering that their home-country nursing qualifications do not meet Ontario RN entry to practice; and (3) navigating disillusionment - living the redefined Canadian dream by returning to nursing school to upgrade their nursing qualifications. CONCLUSIONS: Professional regulatory nursing bodies and nursing educators, as well as practising nurses, must be aware of the potentially confusing and unpleasant processes IENs go through as they qualify for the privilege of practising nursing in Ontario.
PubMed ID
17492985 View in PubMed
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Acute care hospital strategic priorities: perceptions of challenges, control, competition and collaboration in Ontario's evolving healthcare system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173511
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):36-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Adalsteinn D Brown
L Miin Alikhan
Guillermo A Sandoval
Neil Seeman
G Ross Baker
George H Pink
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto.
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):36-47
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chief Executive Officers, Hospital - psychology
Cooperative Behavior
Economic Competition
Health Care Surveys
Health Priorities
Hospital Planning - economics - trends
Humans
National Health Programs - trends
Ontario
Organizational Innovation
Abstract
To explore the current and pending strategic agenda of Ontario hospitals (the largest consumers of the provincial healthcare budget), a survey of Ontario acute care hospital CEOs was conducted in January 2004. The survey, with an 82% response rate, identifies 29 strategic priorities under seven key strategic themes consistent across different hospital types. These themes include (1) human resources cultivation, (2) service integration and partnerships, (3) consumer engagement, (4) corporate governance and management, (5) organizational efficiency and redesign, (6) improved information use for decision-making, (7) patient care management. The extent to which an individual hospital's control over strategic resolutions is perceived may affect multilevel strategic priority-setting and action-planning. In addition to supporting ongoing development of meaningful performance measures and information critical to strategic decision-making, this study's findings may facilitate a better understanding of hospitals' key resource commitments, the extent of competition and collaboration for key resources, the perceived degree of individual control over strategic issue resolution and where systemic resolutions may be required.
PubMed ID
16078398 View in PubMed
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Adapting to waiting lists for coronary revascularization. Do Canadian specialists agree on which patients come first?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224256
Source
Chest. 1992 Mar;101(3):715-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
C D Naylor
C M Levinton
R S Baigrie
Author Affiliation
Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Chest. 1992 Mar;101(3):715-22
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology
Coronary Disease - classification - surgery
Data Collection
Emergencies
Humans
Myocardial Revascularization
Ontario
Risk factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To assess specialists' adaptation to long waiting lists for coronary revascularization, and their acceptance of a formal queue-ordering schema proposed by an expert panel.
Mail survey of practitioners in referral centers using 49 hypothetical case scenarios. Scenarios were rated for maximum acceptable delay prior to coronary surgery, on a scale with seven interventional time frames graded from emergency to three to six months' permissible delay. The survey included the proposed schema and rating system; respondents were invited to differ as they saw fit. HYPOTHETICAL PATIENTS: Assumed uniformly to be middle aged with typical angina, but clinical factors varied, eg, severity and stability of angina, response to medical therapy, coronary anatomy, and noninvasive test results. PHYSICIAN SUBJECTS: There were 122 respondents, for a 60 percent response rate, including a majority of cardiac surgeons and invasive cardiologists on staff in Ontario teaching hospitals.
Fifty-seven percent rated some scenarios for acceptable waiting times of three to six months; another 39 percent rated their least urgent scenarios to wait six weeks to three months. Interpractitioner agreement was high: for 48/49 scenarios, at least 75 percent of urgency ratings fell within two contiguous points on the scale. Symptom status was the dominant determinant of waiting time, with mean maximum acceptable wait of 74 days for patients with mild-moderate stable angina but three days for those receiving parenteral nitroglycerin (p less than 0.00001). About half the ratings matched those predicted based on the original panel's consensus criteria; 90 percent were within one scale point.
Specialist practitioners in Ontario have adapted to waiting lists for coronary artery bypass surgery/percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, and assess the priority of hypothetical patients in similar ways and in reasonable accord with formal queue-ordering criteria. This behavior may help mitigate the impact of resource constraints, allowing delay of services for those with less acute need--a potential contrast to delayed access in America based on low income or lack of insurance.
PubMed ID
1541137 View in PubMed
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Adolescents on a general hospital psychiatric unit: problems and remedies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244069
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Nov;32(11):782-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1981
Author
G. Molnar
A. Bernardo
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Nov;32(11):782-5
Date
Nov-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acting Out
Adolescent
Attitude of Health Personnel
Hospitals, General
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Ontario
Patient Admission
Patient Care Planning
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Abstract
The care and treatment of adolescents on an adult acute psychiatric unit in a general hospital can pose serious problems for unit staff. Adolescents with behavior or character problems who prove violent or manipulative can disrupt treatment of both the adolescent and adult patients on the unit. Yet the demand for immediate treatment for many adolescents and the accessibility of general hospital psychiatric units often mean that adolescents may placed there inappropriately. This paper describes how an adult acute unit in a general hospital solved the problems caused by acting-out, manipulative adolescents on the unit. A committee found problems in inappropriate admissions, unworkable treatment plans, management of acting-out behaviors, case disposition, and staff attitudes. Remedies came in the form of more specific admission and discharge guidelines, strict enforcement of those guidelines, staff discussion of treatment plans, an inservice education program, and improved liaison with community facilities for adolescents.
PubMed ID
7286932 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescents with anorexia nervosa: multiple perspectives of discharge readiness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173064
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sheri L Turrell
Ron Davis
Heather Graham
Iris Weiss
Author Affiliation
Eating Disorders Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sturrell@nygh.on.ca
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Aftercare
Anorexia Nervosa - psychology - therapy
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Community Mental Health Services
Convalescence - psychology
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Patient Discharge - standards
Patient Education as Topic
Pilot Projects
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Abstract
Little is known about the conditions that must be in place to help adolescent patients and their families gain the confidence needed to continue recovery at home, following the adolescents' hospitalization for anorexia nervosa.
Beliefs about discharge readiness were obtained through an open-ended questionnaire following the patients' first weekend pass home from an in-patient unit. The perceptions of patients, parents, and registered nurses were obtained using parallel versions of a questionnaire.
An examination of the responses revealed four themes; medical stability, education, psychological changes, and community resource planning, that were common to all respondents, as well as themes specific to adolescents and to nurses.
The findings suggest that each group of respondents has unique discharge readiness needs and that registered nurses have an important role to play in helping patients and families make the transition home as successful as possible. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.
PubMed ID
16137269 View in PubMed
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713 records – page 1 of 72.