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[Involvement of patients has not been fully implemented in Danish health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281247
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Apr 27;177(18)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-2015
Author
Line Hjøllund Pedersen
Annette Wandel
Morten Freil
Alexandra Brandt Ryborg Jönsson
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Apr 27;177(18)
Date
Apr-27-2015
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Denmark
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Patient Participation
Abstract
In Denmark, there is a focus on patient involvement. Health professionals want to involve patients, but have diverse interpretations of what this entails, which complicates knowledge dissemination. Interventions are scattered and diverse, and often do not systematically involve patients' knowledge. Studies have shown that patients want to be involved and contribute with knowledge, but this only happens to a limited degree. Involvement of patients is often limited to involving their resources in the form of self care rather than integrating their knowledge into their treatment and care.
PubMed ID
25922241 View in PubMed
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Advanced nurse practitioners' attitudes, practices, and beliefs regarding child maltreatment

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293360
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2002
Author
Neely, Nancy
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Pediatric nursing -- Alaska
Nurse practitioners -- Attitudes -- Alaska
Nurse practitioners -- Attitude. -- Alaska
Notes
RJ 245 .G52 2002
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HIV infection and Norwegian general practitioners: does fear affect knowledge?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8103
Source
Fam Pract. 1993 Mar;10(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
P. Voltersvik
J. Rise
E. Laerum
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Bergen Health Authority, Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
Source
Fam Pract. 1993 Mar;10(1):1-7
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Fear
HIV Infections - psychology - transmission
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Norway
Physicians, Family - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective was to study the dimensionality of knowledge among general practitioners in Norway about transmission of HIV and what factors influence the degree of knowledge. Data were collected by a mailed questionnaire. Independent variables were experience of HIV, acquisition of knowledge and confidence in information on HIV from the central authorities and perception of own knowledge, skills of practice and fear of oneself or one's family contracting the HIV infection. Analysis of variance and multiple classification analysis were applied to measure the effect of independent variables on knowledge about transmission of HIV. The general practitioners in three counties (Oslo, Møre og Romsdal and Troms), constituting one-quarter of the Norwegian general practitioner population were selected (n = 578). The response rate was 65%, and the results are assumed to be representative of Norwegian general practitioners. Four dimensions of knowledge about transmission of HIV were identified by factor analysis. The two most important, transmission through 'body fluids' and transmission by 'needle sticks', were subsequently converted into sum scores and used as dependent variables. Forty-five per cent of the respondents were uncertain about ways in which HIV is not transmitted through 'body fluids'. There was an association between knowledge about transmission through 'body fluids' and the variables county background, confidence in the information about HIV and fear of contracting HIV. In the multiple classification analysis these three variables explained 11% of the variation in knowledge about transmission through 'body fluids'. Only confidence and fear significantly predicted the degree of knowledge, and among the 11% who had no confidence in the information received the effect of fear on knowledge increased significantly.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8477886 View in PubMed
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Canadian physicians and euthanasia: 3. Arguments and beliefs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221048
Source
CMAJ. 1993 May 15;148(10):1699-702
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1993
Author
J R Williams
F. Lowy
D M Sawyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Ethics and Legal Affairs, Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa, ON.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 May 15;148(10):1699-702
Date
May-15-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Canada
Euthanasia
Humans
Suicide, Assisted
Notes
Cites: Bull Am Coll Surg. 1992 Mar;77(3):6-1710116890
Cites: J Clin Ethics. 1992 Summer;3(2):95-1021301843
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1992 Nov 5;327(19):1384-81383820
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1992 Nov 5;327(19):1380-41406842
PubMed ID
8485674 View in PubMed
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[Warning against incorrect attitudes]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62973
Source
Tandlaegebladet. 1981 Oct;85(17):542-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1981
Author
T. Nayberg
Source
Tandlaegebladet. 1981 Oct;85(17):542-6
Date
Oct-1981
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Denmark
Dentists
Humans
Oral Health
PubMed ID
6954667 View in PubMed
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Knowledge and attitudes of Canadian consumers and health care professionals regarding nutritional genomics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152033
Source
OMICS. 2009 Feb;13(1):37-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Karine Morin
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
OMICS. 2009 Feb;13(1):37-41
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Nutrigenomics
Abstract
With advances in the field of nutrigenomics, commercial laboratories have begun marketing genotyping services, nutritional advice, and dietary supplements "tailored" to match individual genetic predispositions. Although primarily offered by American companies, these services are available to Canadian consumers via the Internet. Qualitative research in the form of focus groups with members of the Canadian public was undertaken to assess the current level of understanding of and receptivity toward this new genomic application. Additionally, focus groups with health care professionals (physicians, pharmacists, dieticians, nutritionists, and naturopaths) investigated their interest in integrating nutrigenomics into health care delivery, and their capacity to do so. Gauging knowledge and attitudes early in the introduction of a new technology serves to identify potential "blind spots" regarding the ethical, legal, and social implications. Preliminary results indicate consumers believe potential benefits of nutrigenomics outweigh risks, while health care professionals express more skepticism. Both groups agree that more public education about nutrigenomics is needed and that regulatory oversight should ensure consumer protection.
PubMed ID
19290810 View in PubMed
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[Knowledge and attitudes toward vaccination among midwives in Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113619
Source
Sante Publique. 2013 Jan-Feb;25(1):35-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eve Dubé
Maryline Vivion
Alena Valderrama
Chantal Sauvageau
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec 2400, av. D'Estimauville, G1E 7G9 Québec, Québec.
Source
Sante Publique. 2013 Jan-Feb;25(1):35-43
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Midwifery
Quebec
Vaccination
Abstract
Vaccine acceptability among Quebec midwives is not well documented. The purpose of this study was to examine midwives' knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to immunization in Quebec.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 participants (17 midwives and 8 midwifery students). The mean duration of the interviews was 1 hour. The interviews were conducted in 2010 and were audiotaped, transcribed and submitted to content analysis using NVivo 8 software.
In addition to the laws regulating midwifery practice in Quebec, the findings suggest that most midwifery interventions are based on midwifery philosophy. Informed choice is one of the key principles of this philosophy. In order to help women make an informed decision about vaccination, midwives seek to outline the pros and cons of vaccination using government documentation, as well as other sources such as books on naturopathy. Most of the participating midwives recognized that vaccination has advantages, including disease prevention and free vaccines. Various arguments against vaccination were also identified. Most of these were related to the vaccination schedule and to combined vaccines. Some of the participants noted that it was difficult to find unbiased information about vaccination.
This study highlights the key role of midwifery philosophy in midwifery practice. Most decisions (such as vaccination) are made on the basis of the principle of informed choice. Most of the participants noted that they lacked information on vaccination.
PubMed ID
23705333 View in PubMed
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Medical and lay attitudes towards genetic screening and testing in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184230
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2003 Aug;11(8):565-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Hanna Toiviainen
Piia Jallinoja
Arja R Aro
Elina Hemminki
Author Affiliation
1National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES), Health and Social Services, PO Box 220, 00531 Helsinki, Finland. hanna.toiviainen@stakes.fi
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2003 Aug;11(8):565-72
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Education, Medical
Female
Finland
Genetic Diseases, Inborn
Genetic Testing - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Midwifery
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare physicians', midwives' and lay people's attitudes towards genetic screening and testing to find out whether medical education and experience influence attitudes of genetic screening and testing. The study was based on comparison of answers to joint questions in three different cross-sectional postal surveys between October 1996 and April 1998 in Finland. Target groups were physicians (study base n=772, response rate 74%, including gynaecologists, paediatricians, general practitioners and clinical geneticists), midwives and public health nurses (collectively referred to as midwives in the following; n=800, response rate 79%), and lay people (n=2000, response rate 62%). Midwives were more worried about the consequences of genetic testing and stressed the autonomy of the customer more strongly than lay people did. Furthermore, professionals considered that lay peoples' expectations as regards to genetic testing are too high. Having more medical education was related to having less 'cannot say' and missing responses. Our results do not suggest that major conflicts about the direction of genetic testing and screening would arise in near future. However, different positions and interests should be considered. Reporting in public about new prospects and developments in medical genetics should pay more attention also to concerns for balancing promises and drawbacks.
PubMed ID
12891376 View in PubMed
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[Smoking habits of medical students. Smoking habits of Danish medical students and their knowledge about and attitudes to the tobacco problem]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67831
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Feb 10;154(7):419-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1992
Author
A C Hilberg
S. Lyager
N. Naeraa
C. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Fysiologisk Institut, Aarhus Universitet.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Feb 10;154(7):419-23
Date
Feb-10-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
In 1987, 74 Danish first-year and 90 final-year medical students from Aarhus University participated in a global questionnaire investigation concerning the smoking habits of medical students and their attitudes to the tobacco problem. This investigation was initiated by the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. In order to observe particular characteristics or unexpected findings, the Danish percentage replies were calculated and compared with corresponding average figures for the other European medical students and Danish doctors and the normal population. A statistically significant difference was demonstrated in a single instance only: the proportion of smokers among Danish final-year female medical students in the last term was considerably higher than among junior doctors. Strikingly few Danish medical students towards the end of their curriculum considered smoking the main cause of coronary disease but problems in translation were possibly involved here. Unless a concrete reason was present, Danish medical students were very reticent concerning discussion of the injurious effects of smoking with patients. A possible reason for this was that only one fourth of the Danish final-year students considered that their present knowledge formed an adequate basis for patient counselling.
PubMed ID
1536054 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards genetically modified and organic foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170169
Source
Appetite. 2006 May;46(3):324-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Marieke Saher
Marjaana Lindeman
Ulla-Kaisa Koivisto Hursti
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 9, 00014 Helsinki, Finland. marieke.saher@helsinke.fi
Source
Appetite. 2006 May;46(3):324-31
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Attitude to Health
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Finland
Food, Genetically Modified - standards
Health Food
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Students - psychology
Abstract
Finnish students (N=3261) filled out a questionnaire on attitudes towards genetically modified and organic food, plus the rational-experiential inventory, the magical thinking about food and health scale, Schwartz's value survey and the behavioural inhibition scale. In addition, they reported their eating of meat. Structural equation modelling of these measures had greater explanatory power for attitudes towards genetically modified (GM) foods than for attitudes towards organic foods (OF). GM attitudes were best predicted by natural science education and magical food and health beliefs, which mediated the influence of thinking styles. Positive attitudes towards organic food, on the other hand, were more directly related to such individual differences as thinking styles and set of values. The results of the study indicate that OF attitudes are rooted in more fundamental personal attributes than GM attitudes, which are embedded in a more complex but also in a more modifiable network of characteristics.
PubMed ID
16546293 View in PubMed
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15428 records – page 1 of 1543.