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A 3-year follow-up study of Swedish youths committed to juvenile institutions: Frequent occurrence of criminality and health care use regardless of drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288173
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ola Ståhlberg
Sofia Boman
Christina Robertsson
Nóra Kerekes
Henrik Anckarsäter
Thomas Nilsson
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Recurrence
Residential Treatment - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This 3-year follow-up study compares background variables, extent of criminality and criminal recidivism in the form of all court convictions, the use of inpatient care, and number of early deaths in Swedish institutionalized adolescents (N=100) with comorbid substance use disorders (SUD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (n=25) versus those with SUD but no ADHD (n=30), and those without SUD (n=45). In addition it aims to identify whether potential risk factors related to these groups are associated with persistence in violent criminality. Results showed almost no significant differences between the three diagnostic groups, but the SUD plus ADHD group displayed a somewhat more negative outcome with regard to criminality, and the non-SUD group stood out with very few drug related treatment episodes. However, the rate of criminal recidivism was strikingly high in all three groups, and the use of inpatient care as well as the number of untimely deaths recorded in the study population was dramatically increased compared to a age matched general population group. Finally, age at first conviction emerged as the only significant predictor of persistence in violent criminality with an AUC of .69 (CI (95%) .54-.84, p=.02). Regardless of whether SUD, with or without ADHD, is at hand or not, institutionalized adolescents describe a negative course with extensive criminality and frequent episodes of inpatient treatment, and thus requires a more effective treatment than present youth institutions seem to offer today. However, the few differences found between the three groups, do give some support that those with comorbid SUD and ADHD have the worst prognosis with regard to criminality, health, and untimely death, and as such are in need of even more extensive treatment interventions.
PubMed ID
27745884 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy preceded by an experimental Attention Bias Modification procedure in recurrent depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299363
Source
Trials. 2018 Mar 27; 19(1):203
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Mar-27-2018
Author
Tom Østergaard
Tobias Lundgren
Robert Zettle
Rune Jonassen
Catherine J Harmer
Tore C Stiles
Nils Inge Landrø
Vegard Øksendal Haaland
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Sørlandet Hospital, Arendal, Norway. tom.ostergaard@sshf.no.
Source
Trials. 2018 Mar 27; 19(1):203
Date
Mar-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attentional Bias
Depression - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Norway
Psychotherapy, Group
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Recurrence
Remission Induction
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
This project studies the effect of group-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) following Attention Bias Modification (ABM) on residual symptoms in recurrent depression. ACT is a cognitive-behavioral intervention combining acceptance and mindfulness processes with commitment and behavior-change processes. ACT enjoys modest empirical support in treating depression and has also shown promising results in secondary prevention of depression. The experimental cognitive bias modification (ABM) procedure has been shown to reduce surrogate markers of depression vulnerability in patients in remission from depression. The aim of the current project is to investigate if the effect of group-based ACT on reducing residual depressive symptoms can be enhanced by preceding it with ABM. Also, assessment of the relationship between conceptually relevant therapeutic processes and outcome will be investigated.
An invitation to participate in this project was extended to 120 individuals within a larger sample who had just completed a separate randomized, multisite, clinical trial (referred to hereafter as Phase 1) in which they received either ABM (n = 60) or a control condition without bias modification (n = 60). This larger Phase-1 sample consisted of 220 persons with a history of at least two episodes of major depression who were currently in remission or not fulfilling the criteria of major depression. After its inclusion, Phase-1 participants from the Sørlandet site (n = 120) were also recruited for this study in which they received an 8-week group-based ACT intervention. Measures will be taken immediately after Phase 1, 1 month, 2 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the conclusion of Phase 1.
This study sequentially combines acceptable, nondrug interventions from neuropsychology and cognitive-behavioral psychology in treating residual symptoms in depression. The results will provide information about the effectiveness of treatment and on mechanisms and processes of change that may be valuable in understanding and further developing ABM and ACT, combined and alone.
ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT02648165 . Registered on 6 January 2016.
PubMed ID
29587807 View in PubMed
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Acetaminophen use during pregnancy, behavioral problems, and hyperkinetic disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104902
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Apr;168(4):313-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Zeyan Liew
Beate Ritz
Cristina Rebordosa
Pei-Chen Lee
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles.
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Apr;168(4):313-20
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Humans
Hyperkinesis - chemically induced - diagnosis
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - chemically induced - epidemiology
Mothers
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is the most commonly used medication for pain and fever during pregnancy in many countries. Research data suggest that acetaminophen is a hormone disruptor, and abnormal hormonal exposures in pregnancy may influence fetal brain development.
To evaluate whether prenatal exposure to acetaminophen increases the risk for developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like behavioral problems or hyperkinetic disorders (HKDs) in children.
We studied 64,322 live-born children and mothers enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort during 1996-2002.
Acetaminophen use during pregnancy was assessed prospectively via 3 computer-assisted telephone interviews during pregnancy and 6 months after child birth.
To ascertain outcome information we used (1) parental reports of behavioral problems in children 7 years of age using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire; (2) retrieved HKD diagnoses from the Danish National Hospital Registry or the Danish Psychiatric Central Registry prior to 2011; and (3) identified ADHD prescriptions (mainly Ritalin) for children from the Danish Prescription Registry. We estimated hazard ratios for receiving an HKD diagnosis or using ADHD medications and risk ratios for behavioral problems in children after prenatal exposure to acetaminophen.
More than half of all mothers reported acetaminophen use while pregnant. Children whose mothers used acetaminophen during pregnancy were at higher risk for receiving a hospital diagnosis of HKD (hazard ratio?=?1.37; 95% CI, 1.19-1.59), use of ADHD medications (hazard ratio?=?1.29; 95% CI, 1.15-1.44), or having ADHD-like behaviors at age 7 years (risk ratio?=?1.13; 95% CI, 1.01-1.27). Stronger associations were observed with use in more than 1 trimester during pregnancy, and exposure response trends were found with increasing frequency of acetaminophen use during gestation for all outcomes (ie, HKD diagnosis, ADHD medication use, and ADHD-like behaviors; P trend
Notes
Comment In: JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Apr;168(4):306-724566519
PubMed ID
24566677 View in PubMed
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Acute treatment of whiplash neck sprain injuries. A randomized trial of treatment during the first 14 days after a car accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72624
Source
Spine. 1998 Jan 1;23(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-1998
Author
G E Borchgrevink
A. Kaasa
D. McDonagh
T C Stiles
O. Haraldseth
I. Lereim
Author Affiliation
Emergency Clinic, University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Spine. 1998 Jan 1;23(1):25-31
Date
Jan-1-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Activities of Daily Living
Acute Disease
Adult
Attention
Attitude to Health
Braces
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Headache - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Movement
Neck
Neck Pain - etiology
Pain Measurement
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shoulder
Sick Leave
Single-Blind Method
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Whiplash Injuries - complications - rehabilitation - therapy
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: A single-blinded, randomized treatment study with a follow-up period of 6 months. OBJECTIVE: To study the long-term consequences of whiplash neck sprain injuries in patients treated with two different regimes during the first 14 days after the car accident. Patients in the first group were encouraged to act as usual, i.e., continue to engage in their normal, pre-injury activities; that group was compared with another group of patients who were given time off from work and who were immobilized using a soft neck collar. The end point of the comparison was the evaluation of subjective symptoms 6 months after the accident. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Few randomized treatment studies have been performed to evaluate the clinical outcome for patients with neck sprain. METHOD: Patients who participated in the study were recruited from the Emergency Clinic at the University Hospital in Trondheim, Norway. The study group included 201 patients (47% of the study group) with neck sprain that resulted from a car accident. Neck and shoulder movements and subjective symptoms, which were assessed using several different measurements, were assessed during the follow-up period. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction of symptoms from the time of intake to 24 weeks after the treatment period in both groups. There was a significantly better outcome for the act-as-usual group in terms of subjective symptoms, including pain localization, pain during daily activities, neck stiffness, memory, and concentration, and in terms of visual analog scale measurements of neck pain and headache. CONCLUSIONS: The outcome was better for patients who were encouraged to continue engaging in their normal, pre-injury activities as usual than for patients who took sick leave from work and who were immobilized during the first 14 days after the neck sprain injury.
PubMed ID
9460148 View in PubMed
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Adapting an attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder parent training intervention to different cultural contexts: The experience of implementing the New Forest Parenting Programme in China, Denmark, Hong Kong, Japan, and the United Kingdom.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283652
Source
Psych J. 2017 Mar;6(1):83-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Margaret J J Thompson
Alma Au
Cathy Laver-Bradbury
Anne-Mette Lange
Gail Tripp
Shizuka Shimabukuro
Jin S Zhang
Lan Shuai
Catherine E Thompson
David Daley
Edmund J Sonuga-Barke
Source
Psych J. 2017 Mar;6(1):83-97
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - nursing
Child
China
Denmark
Education, Nonprofessional - methods
Hong Kong
Humans
Japan
Parents - education
Program Development
Program Evaluation
United Kingdom
Abstract
The New Forest Parenting Programme (NFPP) is a parenting program developed for parents who have a child with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is a manualized program that is delivered in a parent's home over 8 weeks, or in a group format, or through a self-help manual. Three randomized controlled trials have been carried out in the United Kingdom. The NFPP group has adapted the program according to feedback from parents and therapists, and for use with different populations, both within the United Kingdom and internationally. The first international trial took place in New York, United States. Trials in Denmark, Hong Kong, and Japan followed. More recently, a trial of the self-help manual has been carried out in mainland China. This paper will outline the adaptions that were needed in order to be able to deliver the program in different countries with their own expectations of parenting, culture, and language. Training had to be differently focused; manuals and handouts had to be revised, translated and back-translated; and supervision had to be delivered at a distance to maintain the fidelity of the program. The international group will outline their experience of running trials in their own countries with the NFPP in a face-to-face format (Denmark), a group format (Hong Kong and Japan), and a self-help format (mainland China).
PubMed ID
28371554 View in PubMed
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ADDH and conduct disorder: degree of diagnostic overlap and differences among correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229983
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1989 Nov;28(6):865-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
P. Szatmari
M. Boyle
D R Offord
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1989 Nov;28(6):865-72
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Developmental Disabilities - complications
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Psychosocial Deprivation
Abstract
The objective of this paper was to determine the degree of diagnostic overlap between attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADDH) and conduct disorder (CD) and to see whether ADDH children show a different pattern of demographic, familial, and developmental correlates compared to CD children. The sample for this study consisted of 2,697 4- to 16-year-olds who participated in the Ontario Child Health Study. In terms of diagnostic overlap, ADDH and CD occurred together more often than by chance alone, particularly among girls. Pure groups of ADDH and CD children differed in a variety of ways. In general, ADDH children were younger and had experienced more developmental delays and less psychosocial disadvantage than the CD children. No differences were found with respect to associated impairments, a measure of severity. Children with both ADDH and CD (a mixed group) appeared to represent a true hybrid disorder rather than one diagnosis or the other. These findings support the validity of ADDH compared to CD, at least in terms of the pattern of correlates.
PubMed ID
2478519 View in PubMed
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[ADDH/DAMP--some reflections after the dispute is calming down]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32168
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Apr 18;98(16):1958-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-2001
Author
C. Sundelin
D. Lagerberg
Author Affiliation
claes.sundelin@ped.uas.lul.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Apr 18;98(16):1958-61
Date
Apr-18-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - classification - diagnosis - therapy
Child
Child Psychiatry
Concept Formation
Humans
Sweden
Terminology
PubMed ID
11370417 View in PubMed
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ADHD after fetal exposure to maternal smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97943
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2010 Apr;12(4):408-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Frank Lindblad
Anders Hjern
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. frank.lindblad@neuro.uu.se
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2010 Apr;12(4):408-15
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Smoking during pregnancy has been reported to be associated with a twofold to fourfold increased risk of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the offspring. Genetic and socioeconomic confounders may contribute to this association. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between fetal exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and ADHD, taking such potential confounders into consideration. METHODS: A register study in a population of 982,856 children, 6-19 years of age, born at term, and residents in Sweden in 2006 was conducted. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) of maternal smoking habits during pregnancy on ADHD medication in the 927,007 study subjects where maternal smoking habits were available from the Medical Birth Register in the presence of socioeconomic and parental psychiatric morbidity confounders. To adjust the analysis also for genetic confounding, we used a within-mother between-pregnancy approach in offspring of 26,292 mothers with inconsistent smoking habits (smoking/non-smoking) between pregnancies. RESULTS: The OR for ADHD medication in offspring of mothers who smoked >or=10 cigarettes/day was 2.86 (2.66-3.07) in the entire study population after adjustment for sex and age, while this same exposure yielded an OR of only 1.26 (0.95-1.58) when two pregnancies of the same mother were analyzed in a within-subjects design. DISCUSSION: Smoking during pregnancy has a strong association with ADHD in the offspring in the general Swedish population, but this risk is primarily explained by genetic and socioeconomic confounding.
PubMed ID
20176681 View in PubMed
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ADHD and Disruptive Behavior scores - associations with MAO-A and 5-HTT genes and with platelet MAO-B activity in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93275
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Malmberg Kerstin
Wargelius Hanna-Linn
Lichtenstein Paul
Oreland Lars
Larsson Jan-Olov
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Woman and Child Health, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Unit Q3:04, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. kerstin.malmberg@ki.se
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:28
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - classification - enzymology - psychology
Blood Platelets - enzymology
Diseases in Twins - enzymology - genetics
Female
Humans
Male
Minisatellite Repeats
Monoamine Oxidase - blood - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics
Sex Characteristics
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Pharmacological and genetic studies suggest the importance of the dopaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic systems in the pathogenesis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Disruptive Behavior Disorder (DBD). We have, in a population-based sample, studied associations between dimensions of the ADHD/DBD phenotype and Monoamine Oxidase B (MAO-B) activity in platelets and polymorphisms in two serotonergic genes: the Monoamine Oxidase A Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (MAO-A VNTR) and the 5-Hydroxytryptamine Transporter gene-Linked Polymorphic Region (5-HTT LPR). METHODS: A population-based sample of twins, with an average age of 16 years, was assessed for ADHD/DBD with a clinical interview; Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL). Blood was drawn from 247 subjects and analyzed for platelet MAO-B activity and polymorphisms in the MAO-A and 5-HTT genes. RESULTS: We found an association in girls between low platelet MAO-B activity and symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). In girls, there was also an association between the heterozygote long/short 5-HTT LPR genotype and symptoms of conduct disorder. Furthermore the heterozygote 5-HTT LPR genotype in boys was found to be associated with symptoms of Conduct Disorder (CD). In boys, hemizygosity for the short MAO-A VNTR allele was associated with disruptive behavior. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that the serotonin system, in addition to the dopamine system, should be further investigated when studying genetic influences on the development of Disruptive Behavior Disorders.
PubMed ID
18430257 View in PubMed
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ADHD as a risk factor for incident unprovoked seizures and epilepsy in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30239
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Jul;61(7):731-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Dale C Hesdorffer
Petur Ludvigsson
Elias Olafsson
Gunnar Gudmundsson
Olafur Kjartansson
W Allen Hauser
Author Affiliation
Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, College of Physicians & Surgeons, and Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Jul;61(7):731-6
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Seizures - diagnosis - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) occurs more frequently than expected in prevalent cohorts with epilepsy. The association has been attributed to the epilepsy or its treatment, although it is impossible to determine in previous studies which condition occurs first. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a population-based case-control study of all newly diagnosed unprovoked seizures among Icelandic children younger than 16 years to address the question of time order. DESIGN: Children with seizures were matched to the next 2 same-sex births from the population registry. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children was used to make a DSM-IV diagnosis of ADHD in a standardized fashion among cases and controls aged 3 to 16 years. RESULTS: A history of ADHD was 2.5-fold more common among children with newly diagnosed seizures than among control subjects (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-5.5). The association was restricted to ADHD predominantly inattentive type (odds ratio [OR], 3.7; 95% CI, 1.1-12.8), not ADHD predominantly hyperactive-impulsive type (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.6-5.7) or ADHD combined type (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.3-18.3). Seizure type, etiology, sex, or seizure frequency at diagnosis (1 or >1) did not affect findings. CONCLUSION: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder occurs more often than expected before unprovoked seizures, suggesting a common antecedent for both conditions.
PubMed ID
15237085 View in PubMed
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1007 records – page 1 of 101.