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309 records – page 1 of 31.

A 24-year follow-up of body mass index and cerebral atrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9325
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2004
Author
D. Gustafson
L. Lissner
C. Bengtsson
C. Björkelund
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. deb.gustafson@neuro.gu.se
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Date
Nov-23-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Atrophy
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cerebral Cortex - pathology - radiography
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the longitudinal relationship between body mass index (BMI), a major vascular risk factor, and cerebral atrophy, a marker of neurodegeneration, in a population-based sample of middle-aged women. METHODS: A representative sample of 290 women born in 1908, 1914, 1918, and 1922 was examined in 1968 to 1969, 1974 to 1975, 1980 to 1981, and 1992 to 1993 as part of the Population Study of Women in Göteborg, Sweden. At each examination, women completed a survey on a variety of health and lifestyle factors and underwent anthropometric, clinical, and neuropsychiatric assessments and blood collection. Atrophy of the temporal, frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes was measured on CT in 1992 when participants were age 70 to 84. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between BMI and brain measures. RESULTS: Women with atrophy of the temporal lobe were, on average, 1.1 to 1.5 kg/m2 higher in BMI at all examinations than women without temporal atrophy (p
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2005 Jun 14;64(11):1990-1; author reply 1990-115955971
SummaryForPatientsIn: Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):E19-2015557485
PubMed ID
15557505 View in PubMed
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A 30-year history of MPAN case from Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290990
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2017 Aug; 159:111-113
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
M Selikhova
E Fedotova
S Wiethoff
L V Schottlaender
S Klyushnikov
S N Illarioshkin
H Houlden
Author Affiliation
Reta Lila Weston Institute of Neurological Studies, UCL,1 Wakefield Street, London WC1N 1PJ, United Kingdom. Electronic address: m.selikhova@talk21.com.
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2017 Aug; 159:111-113
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Intellectual Disability - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Mitochondrial Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics
Mitochondrial Proteins - genetics
Muscle Spasticity - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Optic Atrophy - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Russia
Spinocerebellar Ataxias - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Time Factors
Abstract
We present a patient with progressive spastic ataxia, with dystonia and anarthria undiagnosed until detailed genetic analysis revealed an MPAN mutation. Highlighting the worldwide MPAN distribution, a 30year history of absent diagnosis and the impact and cost saving of an early but detailed genetic analysis in complex progressive movement disorders, particularly the anarthric NBIA group.
PubMed ID
28641177 View in PubMed
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67 stereotypes of structural modification of the urothelium in various diseases of the urinary bladder and prostate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88843
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2008 Oct;146(4):415-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Nepomnyashchikh G I
Aidagulova S V
Nepomnyashchikh D L
Boboev M M
Isaenko V I
Abdullaev N A
Ivaninskii O I
Kunin I S
Author Affiliation
Institute of Regional Pathology and Pathomorphology, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia. pathol@soramn.ru
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2008 Oct;146(4):415-9
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrophy - pathology
Cystitis - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Metaplasia - pathology
Middle Aged
Prostate - pathology
Prostatic Diseases - pathology
Prostatic Hyperplasia - pathology
Prostatitis - pathology
Urinary Bladder - pathology
Urinary Bladder Diseases - pathology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - pathology
Urothelium - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Structural modification of the urothelium was studied in various diseases of the urinary bladder and prostate, including urinary bladder cancer, vibration cystopathy, chronic prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, and chronic cystitis. The general phenomena of changes in urinary bladder epithelium were atrophy, squamous metaplasia, and instability of the urothelium (focal atrophy, dysplasia, hyperplasia, and metaplasia). This phenomenon can be interpreted as a morphological marker for cancer risk.
PubMed ID
19489309 View in PubMed
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Abnormal optic disc and retinal vessels in children with surgically treated hydrocephalus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90653
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2009 Apr;93(4):526-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Andersson S.
Hellström A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, 416 85 Göteborg, Sweden. susann.andersson@oft.gu.se
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2009 Apr;93(4):526-30
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fundus Oculi
Gestational Age
Humans
Hydrocephalus - complications - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ophthalmoscopy
Optic Atrophy - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Prospective Studies
Retinal Vessels - pathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
AIMS: To investigate the morphology of the optic disc and retinal vessels in children with surgically treated hydrocephalus. METHODS: A prospective, population-based study was performed in 69 children (median age 9.6 years) with early surgically treated hydrocephalus. All children were examined by ophthalmoscopy. Additionally, optic disc and retinal vessel morphology was evaluated in 55 children by digital image analysis of ocular fundus photographs. RESULTS: Optic atrophy was found in 10 of 69 children (14%). In comparison with a reference group, the median optic-disc area was significantly smaller (p = 0.013) in the children with hydrocephalus. There was no corresponding difference in cup area, so the rim area was significantly smaller in the hydrocephalic children (p = 0.002). Children with hydrocephalus had an abnormal retinal vascular pattern, with significantly straighter retinal arteries and fewer central vessel branching points compared with controls (p
PubMed ID
19106149 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of clinical and radiological classification of the jawbone anatomy for implantation--a survey of 374 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181217
Source
J Oral Implantol. 2004;30(1):30-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Gintaras Juodzbalys
Aune M Raustia
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kaunas University of Medicine, Vainiku 12, LT-3018 Kaunas, Lithuania.
Source
J Oral Implantol. 2004;30(1):30-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alveolar Process - pathology - radiography
Atrophy
Cephalometry - instrumentation
Dental Arch - pathology - radiography
Dental Implantation, Endosseous
Dental Implants
Female
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous - classification - pathology - radiography
Male
Mandible - pathology - radiography
Maxilla - pathology - radiography
Middle Aged
Patient Care Planning
Radiography, Panoramic
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical features of edentulous jaw dental segments (eJDS) in order to offer the most reliable clinical and radiological classification of such segments in planning for implant treatment. A total of 374 patients, 156 men and 218 women, participated in the investigation. The mean age of the patients was 46 years (SD 12.7), ranging between 17 and 73 years. The eJDS were estimated by means of orthopantomogram, computerized tomography, and intraorally with special ridge-mapping callipers for measurement of alveolar process width. A total of 792 screw-shaped and 1-stage Osteofix Dental Implant System (Oulu, Finland) implants were inserted. Dental segments were divided according to the results of the commonly accepted eJDS assessments into 3 clinical-anatomical types. Type I indicated insignificant or no atrophy of eJDS (232 patients with 476 implant sites; 60.1% of the total number). Type II indicated mild to moderate vertical or horizontal atrophy of eJDS (100 patients with 222 sites; 28% of the total number). Type III indicated significant vertical or horizontal atrophy of eJDS (42 patients with 94 sites; 11.9% of the total number). The accuracy of the clinical and radiological classification was adjudged to have been 95.8%. By the process of establishing clinical and radiological classification of the jawbone segments, more reliability was anticipated regarding the insertion of implants both in maxillae and mandibles.
PubMed ID
15008452 View in PubMed
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The Acute Bone Atrophy and Its Roentgen Picture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279729
Source
Acta Radiol. 2016 Oct;57(10):e152-209
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016

Acute liver failure meets SOPH syndrome: A case report on an intermediate phenotype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283558
Source
Pediatrics. 2017 Jan;139(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Fanny Kortüm
Iris Marquardt
Malik Alawi
Georg Christoph Korenke
Stephanie Spranger
Peter Meinecke
Kerstin Kutsche
Source
Pediatrics. 2017 Jan;139(1)
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Child, Preschool
DNA Mutational Analysis
Developmental Disabilities - diagnosis - genetics
Dwarfism - diagnosis - genetics
Exome - genetics
Female
Heterozygote Detection
Humans
Liver Failure, Acute - diagnosis - genetics
Mutation, Missense - genetics
Neoplasm Proteins - deficiency - genetics
Optic Atrophy - diagnosis - genetics
Pelger-Huet Anomaly - diagnosis - genetics
Phenotype
Syndrome
Abstract
Acute liver failure (ALF) is a life-threatening condition in the absence of preexisting liver disease in children. The main clinical presentation comprises hepatic dysfunction, elevated liver biochemical values, and coagulopathy. The etiology of ALF remains unclear in most affected children; however, the recent identification of mutations in the neuroblastoma amplified sequence (NBAS) gene in autosomal recessively inherited ALF has shed light on the cause of a subgroup of fever-triggered pediatric ALF episodes. Previously, biallelic mutations in NBAS have been reported to be associated with a syndrome comprising short stature, optic atrophy, and Pelger-Huët anomaly (SOPH) specifically occurring in the Yakut population. No hepatic phenotype has been observed in individuals with this disorder who all carry the homozygous NBAS founder mutation c.5741G>A [p.(Arg1914His)]. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl with the cardinal features of SOPH syndrome: characteristic facial dysmorphism, postnatal growth retardation, delay of bone age, slender long bones, optic atrophy, and Pelger-Huët anomaly. During the first 2 years of her life, a series of infections with episodes of fever were accompanied by elevated liver enzyme levels, but hyperammonemia, hypoglycemia, coagulopathy, or encephalopathy suggestive of acute and severe liver disease were never observed. Whole exome sequencing in the patient revealed compound heterozygosity of the 2 NBAS variants, p.(Arg1914His) and p.(Glu943*). This case highlights the variability of clinical presentation associated with NBAS deficiency. Absence of severe liver problems in this case and SOPH-affected Yakut subjects suggests that individuals carrying the NBAS missense mutation p.(Arg1914His) are less susceptible to developing ALF.
PubMed ID
28031453 View in PubMed
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Ageing and human muscle: observations from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221524
Source
Can J Appl Physiol. 1993 Mar;18(1):2-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
J. Lexell
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Can J Appl Physiol. 1993 Mar;18(1):2-18
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscular Atrophy - pathology
Myofibrils - ultrastructure
Sweden
Abstract
The purposes of this review are to summarize studies of cross-sections of autopsied whole muscles from previously physically healthy males and to focus on the cause of the ageing atrophy. The ageing atrophy begins around 25 years of age and thereafter accelerates. This is caused mainly by a loss of muscle fibres, and to a lesser extent by a reduction in fibre size, mostly of the proportion of the fibre area in the muscle cross-section occupied by type 2 (fast-twitch) fibres. In muscle from old subjects, there is a significant increase in the number of enclosed fibres, indicating an increased incidence of fibre type grouping, a loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, and a reduction in the number of functioning motor units. These findings strongly suggest a combination of a progressive denervation process and an altered physical activity level as the two major mechanisms underlying the effects of normal ageing on human muscle. These changes have obvious implications for old individuals and their participation in physical activity and in sports, which must be accommodated in rehabilitation regimes or in training programmes.
PubMed ID
8471991 View in PubMed
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The aging of skin: chronoaging versus photoaging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37787
Source
Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 1990 Feb;7(1):3-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
A. Oikarinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 1990 Feb;7(1):3-4
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrophy
Child
Collagen - biosynthesis - radiation effects
Comparative Study
Humans
Retinoids - therapeutic use
Skin - metabolism - pathology - radiation effects
Skin Aging - physiology
Sunlight - adverse effects
PubMed ID
2371168 View in PubMed
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309 records – page 1 of 31.