Skip header and navigation

1 records – page 1 of 1.

Mild Hypokalemia and Supraventricular Ectopy Increases the Risk of Stroke in Community-Dwelling Subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283189
Source
Stroke. 2017 Mar;48(3):537-543
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Nick Mattsson
Preman Kumarathurai
Bjørn Strøier Larsen
Olav Wendelboe Nielsen
Ahmad Sajadieh
Source
Stroke. 2017 Mar;48(3):537-543
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Premature Complexes - complications - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Humans
Hypokalemia - complications - epidemiology
Incidence
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Stroke is independently associated with the common conditions of hypokalemia and supraventricular ectopy, and we hypothesize that the combination of excessive supraventricular ectopic activity and hypokalemia has a synergistic impact on the prognosis in terms of stroke in the general population.
Subjects (55-75 years old) from the Copenhagen Holter Study cohort (N=671) with no history of atrial fibrillation or stroke were studied-including baseline values of potassium and ambulatory 48-hour Holter monitoring. Excessive supraventricular ectopic activity is defined as =30 premature atrial complexes per hour or any episodes of runs of =20. Hypokalemia was defined as plasma-potassium =3.6 mmol/L. The primary end point was ischemic stroke. Cox models were used.
Hypokalemia was mild (mean, 3.4 mmol/L; range, 2.7-3.6). Hypokalemic subjects were older (67.0±6.94 versus 64.0±6.66 years; P
PubMed ID
28174323 View in PubMed
Less detail